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Old January 22nd, 2015, 12:43 PM   #1
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C-log

Does anyone have any tips on grading the C100 c-log footage? Is it just a matter of adding some contrast or is it more involved?
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Old January 22nd, 2015, 01:27 PM   #2
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Re: C-log

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Originally Posted by Kathy Smith View Post
Does anyone have any tips on grading the C100 c-log footage? Is it just a matter of adding some contrast or is it more involved?
It's as simple or as complicated as you want it to be. Whatever NLE you are using learn to read the waveform. At a minimum you will be adjusting bringing down the shadows to point of crushing them or just barely crushing them and similarly, in most cases, also bringing up your highlights so that they are closer to 100 IRE.

You can then adjust your midpoint if the image looks too bright or too dark overall.

It goes without saying that you should be working on a calibrated display.

Personal preference comes in to play as well along with whatever "look" you may be trying to achieve.

Beyond that you can go into adjusting areas within the frame locally.

Here's a blog post I did about grading a project in c-log: Cool Beans, Lighting and Grading 44 North .

If you were to go about it without doing the localized work I'd go about it a bit differently (the first pass for each would hew closer to the needed skin tone of the subjects.)

Here's another blog post which shows before and after grading on a few frames of c-log from a project: C Notes .
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Old January 23rd, 2015, 05:07 AM   #3
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Re: C-log

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Originally Posted by Jon Roemer View Post
It's as simple or as complicated as you want it to be. Whatever NLE you are using learn to read the waveform. At a minimum you will be adjusting bringing down the shadows to point of crushing them or just barely crushing them and similarly, in most cases, also bringing up your highlights so that they are closer to 100 IRE.

You can then adjust your midpoint if the image looks too bright or too dark overall.

It goes without saying that you should be working on a calibrated display.

Personal preference comes in to play as well along with whatever "look" you may be trying to achieve.

Beyond that you can go into adjusting areas within the frame locally.

Here's a blog post I did about grading a project in c-log: Cool Beans, Lighting and Grading 44 North .

If you were to go about it without doing the localized work I'd go about it a bit differently (the first pass for each would hew closer to the needed skin tone of the subjects.)

Here's another blog post which shows before and after grading on a few frames of c-log from a project: C Notes .
Thanks Jon! Checked out the links you sent. They are very helpful
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Old February 3rd, 2015, 03:44 PM   #4
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Re: C-log

How much do I gain by shooting C-log vs Wide DR?
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Old February 3rd, 2015, 05:32 PM   #5
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Re: C-log

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How much do I gain by shooting C-log vs Wide DR?
Not my intent to sound flippant, but if you have to ask, you'd probably be best to stick with Wide DR. I routinely go back and forth between the two, and WDR is very, very good.
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Old February 4th, 2015, 09:34 AM   #6
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Not my intent to sound flippant, but if you have to ask, you'd probably be best to stick with Wide DR. I routinely go back and forth between the two, and WDR is very, very good.
But what is so different between c-log and WDR? Why would be the instances where I wouldn't want to shoot in C-log?
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Old February 4th, 2015, 11:18 AM   #7
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Re: C-log

Kathy,

Lots of people don't want to grade... if you use c-log, you have to grade it, or it looks like crap. I use Wide DR all the time, as opposed to c-log. I find that (so far) in most everything that I've shot, that this is provides sufficient expose latitude and then I use Red Giant color suite (magic bullet Looks), to create a more pleasing look.

If you want to color grade, but don't want to color grade - the Red Giant Color Suite option is quite good, and easy to use. You can start with the preset Magic Bullet Looks settings, then fine tune them for your preference, and then save them to apply to other scenes.

Dynamic range (or the lack of it), was always a killer in standard and DSLR video.

This image was shot on one of the early Red cameras. It showed a scale of DR that few thought was possible.

http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/attachme...-hdrx-barn.jpg
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Old February 4th, 2015, 11:45 AM   #8
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Re: C-log

You also have to know how you are exposing and know how to properly expose for C-log. You can somewhat eyeball it on the monitor if you use the built-in LUT, but in that case you might as well just shoot WDR anyway.
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Old February 4th, 2015, 04:56 PM   #9
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Re: C-log

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Originally Posted by Ken Diewert View Post
Kathy,

Lots of people don't want to grade... if you use c-log, you have to grade it, or it looks like crap. I use Wide DR all the time, as opposed to c-log. I find that (so far) in most everything that I've shot, that this is provides sufficient expose latitude and then I use Red Giant color suite (magic bullet Looks), to create a more pleasing look.

If you want to color grade, but don't want to color grade - the Red Giant Color Suite option is quite good, and easy to use. You can start with the preset Magic Bullet Looks settings, then fine tune them for your preference, and then save them to apply to other scenes.

Dynamic range (or the lack of it), was always a killer in standard and DSLR video.

This image was shot on one of the early Red cameras. It showed a scale of DR that few thought was possible.

http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/attachme...-hdrx-barn.jpg
But can you get more dynamic range from c-log than WDR?
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Old February 4th, 2015, 05:26 PM   #10
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Re: C-log

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Originally Posted by Kathy Smith View Post
But can you get more dynamic range from c-log than WDR?
The idea is really more that, if you need more recovery in the highlights or shadows, you can get it. The camera is not making you make that full decision at the time. However, if you're not experienced with shooting log and unless you plan on shooting several tests with it, it could really bite you hard on a paid gig if you're not ready for it.
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Old February 5th, 2015, 07:20 AM   #11
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Re: C-log

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Originally Posted by Ken Diewert View Post
Kathy,

Lots of people don't want to grade... if you use c-log, you have to grade it, or it looks like crap. I use Wide DR all the time, as opposed to c-log. I find that (so far) in most everything that I've shot, that this is provides sufficient expose latitude and then I use Red Giant color suite (magic bullet Looks), to create a more pleasing look.

If you want to color grade, but don't want to color grade - the Red Giant Color Suite option is quite good, and easy to use. You can start with the preset Magic Bullet Looks settings, then fine tune them for your preference, and then save them to apply to other scenes.

Dynamic range (or the lack of it), was always a killer in standard and DSLR video.

This image was shot on one of the early Red cameras. It showed a scale of DR that few thought was possible.

http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/attachme...-hdrx-barn.jpg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Huff View Post
The idea is really more that, if you need more recovery in the highlights or shadows, you can get it. The camera is not making you make that full decision at the time. However, if you're not experienced with shooting log and unless you plan on shooting several tests with it, it could really bite you hard on a paid gig if you're not ready for it.
Thank you. I'm going to stick with WDR until I have time to play with C-LOG
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Old February 6th, 2015, 12:36 AM   #12
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Re: C-log

Another consideration as to whether to use C Log would be whether you are going to pass the files on or edit them yourself.

I have always recorded in C Log but then I always edit my own material. I find it gives an immense latitude in the edit and, as long as you have exposed correctly, it is also a very forgiving mode in terms of recovering either highlights or blacks in the edit.

I use FCPX and get an immense kick from bringing the picture to life. And once you have widened the tonal range of the image and added some sharpness and saturation you can go on to a secondary correction to further balance or accentuate portions of the frame. Within the context of a scene once you have established a base correction or look it is very easy to simply copy the settings to adjacent clips and make minor adjustments.

Having this level of control over the images you produce can provide some real advantages and a lot of pleasure.
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Old February 6th, 2015, 11:38 AM   #13
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Re: C-log

Here is a good thread about LOG shooting and LUT application.

Questions about C-log and LUTS | Philip Bloom Forum
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Old February 6th, 2015, 02:58 PM   #14
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Re: C-log

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Originally Posted by Mark Dobson View Post
Another consideration as to whether to use C Log would be whether you are going to pass the files on or edit them yourself.

I have always recorded in C Log but then I always edit my own material. I find it gives an immense latitude in the edit and, as long as you have exposed correctly, it is also a very forgiving mode in terms of recovering either highlights or blacks in the edit.

I use FCPX and get an immense kick from bringing the picture to life. And once you have widened the tonal range of the image and added some sharpness and saturation you can go on to a secondary correction to further balance or accentuate portions of the frame. Within the context of a scene once you have established a base correction or look it is very easy to simply copy the settings to adjacent clips and make minor adjustments.

Having this level of control over the images you produce can provide some real advantages and a lot of pleasure.
+1 to everything Mark so eloquently said. I agree 100%
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Old February 9th, 2015, 12:18 AM   #15
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Re: C-log

I like to shoot in C-log because of the grading possibilities. I'm into feature movies and grew up with film. When I see film on the screen, it usually screams to me "professional", "big budget", "Hollywood Studio", and a great time in world of make believe. A "film like look" psychologically put me into another dimension and makes what I am watching special.

When I see something on the internet that screams video, I envision a less expensive production that keeps me in the real world and doesn't expand my mind. Don't get me wrong, a Video look is great for documentaries, commercials, etc but a film look, in my opinion, allows ones mind to escape into another dimension. I personally use Cinestyle but look around at other software companies and see if one makes you happy.
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