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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old September 7th, 2009, 03:06 PM   #46
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Thanks for that info!
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Old September 16th, 2009, 09:30 AM   #47
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more footage. nice slow motion!

Philip Bloom Blog Archive Yet more 7d footage, this time nice slow motion
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Old September 26th, 2009, 09:11 AM   #48
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I'm in the 7D hunt (at least on waiting list)

Bad news, good news. I had a car accident last week and my XHA1 was damaged. The good news is the camera was written off by the other person's insurance and I was given the full purchase price for camera, wide-angle lens, and on-camera lite. I do mostly artistic short pieces and interviews, and don't often use the sound from the camera and have a Zoom/NTG-2 and Sennheiser G2 kit if I do need set sound. My daughter is also hoping to pursue photography in college next year and my son is starting his senior film project in a few weeks at Savanannah College of Art and Design and would like accomplish it differently than his peers.

With all this in play, I've ordered the 7D kit w/ 28-135 zoom from Amazon, 3 extra batteries, 2-64GB cards, and a battery grip. Within my budget I can either buy a Merlin Steadicam rig (blow budget a little) or buy a eyepiece and maybe a matte box/rail. I already have a Pentax/Asahi SMC f2 50mm and f3.5 135mm lenses (1980's vintage several 5D forums suggested) and the appropriate adapters. I'm ebaying now for a f1.4 50mm and a f2.8 28mm Asahi or similar Nikkor lenses.

I'm thinking of starting with the "eyesock" viewer and getting the steadycam. Would love the Zacuto viewfinder, but it's a little spendy/not sure I understand what it does for me over the less expensive sock. I've never used a matte box and not sure how essential it is. I'm more into high mobility creative works than lugging 50 pounds around (like with XHA1 and 20 lb tripod).

Suggestions welcome.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 10:55 AM   #49
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Roger, you might look at idcphotography.com for their eyepiece system. It's 1/2 the price of the Zacuto and affixes to the bottom of the camera with a nice machined bracket. The owner emailed me and said he'll have the new bracket designed and in production by the time the 7D is shipping. Apparently the LCD is in a little bit different position. The buy builds 5DMKII attachments for the U.S. Army photographers, so his stuff must be decent.

Generally a lens hood will do what you need in terms of keeping light out of the lens, unless there's some low back or side light. You can use threaded filters instead of a mattebox if you want. You will, I'm sure, need one or two ND filters for bright outdoor work. An ND .3 and .6 would probably do the trick.

When I got my XH A1 I had sold all my old Series 9 filters with theh 2/3" chip camera, so I started over. I didn't want the cumbersomeness of a traditional mattebox and rails either. So I got a Lee Filters screw on bellows lens hood, which has 2 filter slots. It's called a Lee Wide Angle lens hood, or something like that. You can find it on their website and get info by emailing the Lee USA guy. B&H carries it. You have to buy a stepdown adapter ring for whatever size lenses you have. Fortunately the kit lens with the 7D is 72mm, same as the XH A1 lens. The Lee only weighs half a pound. It comes with 2mm slots and you can, for around 20 bucks, buy the wider slots with screws and change out if you want. The 2mm slots are for resin filters, the wider ones for glass. I happen to like the resin ND filters. They're not thin plastic, instead they're made out of the same stuff as your eyeglasses lenses. Lighter weight, not really cheap but less than glass. They may be easier to scratch than glass, but I used them years ago in my 16mm days and never scratched one. The ones I use now are fine, no scratches.

You'll find lots of still photographers using bellows type matte boxes like this, but for some reason video guys want the rods and all that heavy stuff. I'm into quick and simple setup times, generally. We also had bellows matteboxes back in my 16mm days, so I'm comfortable with them.

As far as the Merlin, it might be great for this camera because it's pretty light compared to a video camera. I have a Merlin, but I have the articulating arm/vest package, which is over $2500. The XH A1 is too much for just the Merlin itself, although some people have used it that way successfully. If I were in your shoes, I'd get the camera and some ND filters and wait on the Merlin until you see if you really need it. It's not something you will use every day, most likely, unless you do a lot of walking around shots. Also you'll probably want a pretty wide angle lens for it. I'm not sure the 28mm of the kit lens is wide enough. Generally when I shoot Steadicam stuff, I am zoomed back all the way, which on the 7D would be equivalent to about a 30mm lens. Sigma, by the way has a nice f1.4 30mm and an f1.8 20mm (more costly).

There's yet another viewfinder solution...buy the Hoodman 3.0 from B&H and buy the $55 bracket from Redrock. It's not as elegant as the IDC Photography solution, but probably OK. IDC uses the same Hoodman, which has a diopter that's nice if you wear glasses. Cavision also has an eyepiece and bracket combo that's similar to IDC's, but the eyepiece has a 6x magnifier and no diopter adjustment. It also looks like it might cover up the buttons on the left of the camera. They have a swing-away bracket so you can open it up when needed, which is nice. It's in the $200 range too. B&H does not carry the swingaway bracket at this time, only the regular one, and I think it and eyepiece are under $200.

I hope nobody was hurt in the accident--if so, I'll say congratulations on the loss of your XH A1, since you can now buy the 7D! I hope all those who have XH A1s, HVX200s, Z1s, etc., don't start having car wrecks with their cameras.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 11:01 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by Roger Shealy
w/ 28-135 zoom from Amazon, ...........
Yikes, I suggest spending more on glass, less on on other stuff
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Old September 26th, 2009, 12:30 PM   #51
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Yikes, I suggest spending more on glass, less on on other stuff
Same here, another thing I think you should do is don't skimp on the eye piece, focusing will be the most challenge so don't go cheap on that.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 02:18 PM   #52
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I've read a few posts on great results using older Pentax and Nikkor lenses on 5D forum and the kit's 28 - 135 is a good multipurpose still lens.

I'm very open to specific recommendations on glass if you have personal experience or work showing it in use.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 02:26 PM   #53
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The zoom on the 28-135 is not very smooth, at least on mine. If you plan on stationary work it should be fine. This lens is pretty sharp but, as you know, it lacks a large aperature, it's a good all around lens. The 70-200 f4 IS version would be a nice lens, if you don't think you need the 2.8 version. Another consideration if you don't need IS and plan on using a tripod, is Sigma's 70-200 2.8 lens. My version is very sharp and you can find a used version in the $400-$500 range. If you plan on any hand held work, you should strongly consider the 70-200 2.8 IS lens.

Just my $ .02

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Old September 26th, 2009, 03:19 PM   #54
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Thanks Vincent. Most of my past work has been with a tripod, and I zoom very infrequently while shooting. I've heard good things about Sigma, but never used them. I think Phil had several call-outs in his recent articles of a few lenses he liked. I'll have to reread some of his posts.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 04:07 PM   #55
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I tested the Hoodman and Zacuto loupes at DVExpo, and my personal finding was that the Hoodman version was very specific in terms of your eye registration to the unit--if you shifted a small amount, the edges of the frame would blur. The Zacuto version was much more forgiving in that regard, however I felt it over-magnified the image. I know the idea was to extract as much focus information out of that LCD screen but at a certain point, you're just seeing space between pixels. I'm pretty particular about the image size in a viewfinder; I hate to have to scan side to side when composing an image.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 06:23 PM   #56
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The Zacuto magnifies 3X, doesn't it? I guess that means the Cavision that magnifies 6X might be a bit overdone?
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Old September 26th, 2009, 07:08 PM   #57
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I took the 7d out for some night time timelapse experiments last night. Nowhere near Tom @ Timescapes standards but pretty pleased for my first attempt! Just wish I didn't get bored so easily!!

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Old September 26th, 2009, 09:05 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by Bill Pryor View Post
The Zacuto magnifies 3X, doesn't it? I guess that means the Cavision that magnifies 6X might be a bit overdone?
I'm using the CAVISION product on a Canon T1i, whether it overdoes it or not is really going to depend on the individual using it and on the detail shown on the LCD. As I understand it the LCD on my camera is the same 920,000 pixel version found on the 50D and the same one that is on the 7D, my impression from actual use is that I really appreciate both the magnification (6X although I feel like I could also come to like and work with the 3X on the Zacuto) and the brightness of the LCD image in that viewfinder.

Another plus feature of the CAVISION eyepiece is the size. The lens is larger than found on the Hoodman 3.0, for me it is easy to see in and work with. I have both the CAVISION and the Hoodman and even though the Hoodman offers no magnification I carry it with the neckstrap lanyard when I have to go "light" and work the camera handheld.
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Old September 27th, 2009, 11:25 AM   #59
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You have the Cavision with the swingaway bracket, right? Is it adjustable left and right and forward and backward? I know the bracketry is designed for the 5DMKII and I'm not sure where the LCD of the 7D is in relation to that one.

You said you take yours off for handheld work, is it that heavy?
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Old September 27th, 2009, 04:52 PM   #60
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I know several have raved about the loupe-sock. Haven't heard much about it recently versus the Zacuto, Hoodman, or Cavision. Any comparisons?
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