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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:44 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Stephen Mick View Post
Just got back from picking up my 7D and Canon EF-S 17-55 f2.8 lens. I'll do some test shooting tomorrow and try to post some samples for people to review.

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Please post some footage Stephen. :) I'm looking to pick up the 17-55 2.8 IS again and would love to see how the footage turns out!
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Old September 30th, 2009, 06:13 AM   #47
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I've been looking at the Tonika 12-24 f4 and 11-16 f2.8, both look good. Are any of these Tonika's available with IS?
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Old September 30th, 2009, 06:32 AM   #48
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Is anyone have experiences with the Sigma 17-70 F:2.8-4.5 ? The range, speed and price seems to be interesting for a standard zoom on the 7D.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 08:03 AM   #49
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Lenses

I'll try to get some footage up later tonight, if possible. I've also rented the 85mm f1.2L lens for a shoot next week. I'll be testing that out a bit this weekend, but I think it'll be a killer interview lens.


And don't forget, folks, that renting is still (probably) the best way to get great lenses you couldn't otherwise afford. The above lens costs $2000+ new. I'm renting it for a full week, insured, for $100. It's a great way to offer clients a "wow" without mortgaging the house, and it's a great way to test lenses before buying.

--SM
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Old October 5th, 2009, 06:31 PM   #50
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anyone have experience w/ the tokina 16-50mm 2.8? another option over the tamron 17-50mm 2.8...

Tokina | 16-50mm f/2.8 AT-X 165 PRO DX Autofocus | ATX165PRODXC
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Old October 5th, 2009, 09:39 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Jean-Philippe Archibald View Post
Is anyone have experiences with the Sigma 17-70 F:2.8-4.5 ? The range, speed and price seems to be interesting for a standard zoom on the 7D.
My wife has been using this for her walkaround lens for a few years now. Quite sharp, very usefully range and you can get _really_ close @70mm in macro mode - basically you can place the lens hood down on a table, and you'd be able to focus on the table.
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Old November 1st, 2009, 03:24 AM   #52
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Chris,

what do you think of the Sigma 70-200mm 2.8 over the Canon f/4 version? this lens has gotten excellent reviews and feedback from owners. it doesn't cost too much more than the Canon f/4 plus you gain the extra light w/ the Sigma being an f/2.8. thanks.
Hi
my close friend has sigma, and i have the canon. I compared the lenses thorroughly. first, if you need light, f2.8 is always better then f4, but sigma is far from sharp at f2.8. For video it is less important,then for photo. If you like sharp picture, whell - they say 70-200 F4 is the best of all canon zoom lenses( better then 2.8)

canon F4 are very light, compared to 2.8 lenses

If you buy sigma, go to store and first test sharpness. Try more then one piece, check for back or front focus, and trust me each one of them behave different - dont buy them over mail - only if you like lottery.
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Old November 1st, 2009, 07:20 AM   #53
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I purchased a SMC Takukmar 50mm f1.4 and a SMC Takumar 35mm f2.0 with M42 - EOS adapters for video. The lenses have minor yellowing so I'm bleaching them with UV now. These lenses are exceptional and have extremely smooth focus controls. Much better than the Canon 18-135, 18-55, or Tokina 11-16. They are fully manual, but that's the way we're shooting movies anyway on the 7D. You can get them in very good condition from a variety of sources for around $80 - $150.

I'd love to see an optical comparison to some of these older lenses to high end lenses like the Canon 50mm f1.2.

Last edited by Roger Shealy; November 1st, 2009 at 12:29 PM.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 04:13 PM   #54
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Agree w/ all you're saying, Ray, but the price difference between the IS and non-IS versions of that lens makes me cringe a bit ($650 vs. $1230). Believe I will take the f/4 over the f/2.8 for its smaller size, lower weight and greater portability.
could someone please explain to me the difference between IS and non-IS?

thanks
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Old July 9th, 2010, 04:21 PM   #55
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I.S. is Image Stabilsation. Non IS means the lens lacks this very useful stabilsation feature - if you do any hand held video work IS helps remove those horrible micro jitters, especially with anything on the longer focal length (50mm plus area) that makes many DSLR web videos totally unwatchable (in my view).

IS was developed for stills photography of course (enables you to get sharp hand held shots in low light - with a very slow shutter speed/higher F stop than you'd be able to use otherwise) but is also a great help with video now that we're all doing that too.

Only down side is that some lenses have quite noisy IS (but if you're doing anything important you'd need double system sound anyway). My Canon 70-200mm F4 IS is very noisy with IS on but my Canon EF-S 17-55mm F2.8 IS is VERY quite with the IS on. Both are terrifically effective at stabilisation - just turning the IS off soon reveals just how much so!
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Old July 9th, 2010, 04:29 PM   #56
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got it thanks!
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Old July 9th, 2010, 04:46 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by Andy Wilkinson View Post
I.S. is Image Stabilsation. Non IS means the lens lacks this very useful stabilsation feature - if you do any hand held video work IS helps remove those horrible micro jitters, especially with anything on the longer focal length (50mm plus area) that makes many DSLR web videos totally unwatchable (in my view).

IS was developed for stills photography of course (enables you to get sharp hand held shots in low light - with a very slow shutter speed/higher F stop than you'd be able to use otherwise) but is also a great help with video now that we're all doing that too.

Only down side is that some lenses have quite noisy IS (but if you're doing anything important you'd need double system sound anyway). My Canon 70-200mm F4 IS is very noisy with IS on but my Canon EF-S 17-55mm F2.8 IS is VERY quite with the IS on. Both are terrifically effective at stabilisation - just turning the IS off soon reveals just how much so!
Andy I forgot to ask do I need to enable the IM when using the lens? If my lens is on a tripod do I need to disable like on a video camera?
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Old July 9th, 2010, 05:12 PM   #58
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Generally, yes, switch the IS off when on a tripod - BUT if it's a long shot/your tripod is not the best/it's windy/you're planning to handle the camera a bit (e.g. to pull focus etc). within the shot it's sometimes, nay often, much better to leave IS switched on.

Also, with some of the Canon lenses (like my lovely 70-200mm F4 IS) there are two options with the IS. One helps reduce up/down and side-to-side "wobbles/jitters", the other just up/down wobbles. Using the latter IS setting for any panning video shots can be very helpful.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 05:33 PM   #59
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Generally, yes, switch the IS off when on a tripod - BUT if it's a long shot/your tripod is not the best/it's windy/you're planning to handle the camera a bit (e.g. to pull focus etc). within the shot it's sometimes, nay often, much better to leave IS switched on.

Also, with some of the Canon lenses (like my lovely 70-200mm F4 IS) there are two options with the IS. One helps reduce up/down and side-to-side "wobbles/jitters", the other just up/down wobbles. Using the latter IS setting for any panning video shots can be very helpful.
I'm getting the Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS lens and the Tokina 11-16mm 2.8 so it shouldn't be a problem for either. thanks again.
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Old July 17th, 2010, 11:36 PM   #60
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Question about zoom ring

I have a question about the EF-S 17–55mm zoom lens. when i turn the zoom ring it doesn't feel as smooth like the focus ring it's a bit stiff is this normal for a lens of this quality? Does it loosen up with time?
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