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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old November 23rd, 2009, 02:27 PM   #1
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APS-C Lenses Bad Investment?

Perhaps this stems from a incorrect understanding of how these lenses work, but the way I understand them is the APS-C lenses are specifically made for the cropped sensored cameras like the 7D, correct?

Would it then be a bad investment to buy APS-C lenses knowing that cropped sensors are probably going to be a thing of the past in the future (another misconception on my part?)

Why not just buy "regular," full-format lenses since they can be used on the 7D ANYWAY, albeit cropped, and still be used on any future full-format camera?
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 02:43 PM   #2
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APS-C is here to stay I think, or they would have left the building by now. For digital the one that will eventually be phased out is full frame, but it will be a fight to the death. Camera companies have really been trying for years now to get rid of full frame. When Canon introduced the 5D and the 1Ds, I don't think they thought it would be such a demand from film photographers who where finally ready to convert to digital when FF was what they were waiting for.

Your reasoning is right if you ever plan to buy or use FF cameras.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 03:29 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd Ubshura View Post
Perhaps this stems from a incorrect understanding of how these lenses work, but the way I understand them is the APS-C lenses are specifically made for the cropped sensored cameras like the 7D, correct?
That's correct. A reduced image circle allows APS-C lenses to be cheaper and/or sharper for a given focal length.

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Originally Posted by Lloyd Ubshura View Post
Would it then be a bad investment to buy APS-C lenses knowing that cropped sensors are probably going to be a thing of the past in the future (another misconception on my part?)
Misconception. APS-C will only get more and more popular as the price drops and they are used in new types of cameras, like the miniature interchangeable cameras available on Four Thirds.

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Originally Posted by Lloyd Ubshura View Post
Why not just buy "regular," full-format lenses since they can be used on the 7D ANYWAY, albeit cropped, and still be used on any future full-format camera?
Because they cost more and have lower image quality. Try comparing the Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 vs the Canon 17-40 f/4 L. The APS-C lens is cheaper, longer, faster, sharper, and superior in almost every way. One important way that it is not superior is the manual focus ring.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 03:46 PM   #4
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I pretty much agree. Unless you're planning on buying a 5DMKII, there's no good reason not to buy an APS-C lens. As adapters start appearing to use 35mm cine lenses on the 7D, the chip size should only get more popular.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 03:58 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Daniel Browning View Post
Because they cost more and have lower image quality. The APS-C lens is cheaper, longer, faster, sharper, and superior in almost every way.
I think you're thinking more like a video person here and not still photographer which these lenses and camera are made for. In that case FF is always superior not only because just about every industry is still formatted to film standards but also because you will always be able to print larger and retain image quality with a FF then APS-C. Then there is DOF limitation that the crop sensor has and less sensitivity. This is why film photographers fought and waited until digital finally made a FF before the huge shift happened 4-5 years ago.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 04:51 PM   #6
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For still photography, that's true.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 05:17 PM   #7
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I'm overjoyed that I can get less expensive, lighter glass for my APS-C 7D. For the video world it's just the right size. I think as chips get better, more sensitive, as technology marches on, we may see the decline or extinction of 35 full frame. I wish there was more of the premium glass for APS-C, I have a feeling it would cut significantly into the "L" glass market.

As far as advice, I think this forum is about video and therefore the bias is toward what's good for video as opposed to a still photographer. I can see for stills that ff has an advantage in light sensitivity and versatility. However, I can only see the APS-C cameras getting better and better, and Canon and Nikon's newest flagship DSLRs are APS-C (in some cases) because I think they see the trend.

If you're investing in "L" ff glass cause you want to upgrade to a ff DSLR in the future I don't know if this is wise, I mean technology gets better and cheaper all the time, and your good APS-C lenses aren't going to devalue.

One of the things I'm a little excited about getting good glass, whether ff or crop sized, is that when I eventually upgrade my Sony EX1 to a EX3, I can put an adapter and then put my good glass on that and get like a 5000mm tele for wildlife. Because a 1/2" sensor is so much smaller than APS-C, you get that 'magnification factor' with an excellent lens.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 05:33 PM   #8
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I like the 5D because I have bought a closet full of old glass that works wonders with the full frame format. And visualization is easier for me because I am used to what lenses have what approximate angle of view because of our experience with the 35mm still format.

Some don't realize, however, that the 7D sensor is closer to the imager size of a celluloid 35mm camera, than the 5D. So for the more film like depth of field we are are searching for in these cameras, the 7D gets you closer to the traditional 35mm cinema camera. In fact, there are times with the 5D where you will end up fighting to shallow a depth of field. Of course the easy resolution of that problem is stopping down the lens to extend depth of field.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 06:00 PM   #9
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Considering the _millions_ of Canon APS-C format DSLRs currently in use, what makes you think it's going away anytime soon?
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 06:29 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Christopher Lovenguth View Post
FF is always superior
My comments applied to using FF lenses on APS-C bodies. What you say is only true when you compare FF bodies vs APS-C bodies, but that's not what this thread is about.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 07:08 PM   #11
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APS-C?

Heck, I still shoot 5 x 7 inch - haven't seen a sensor in that size yet (although there are scanning digital backs if you can get some of the bailout money from Barry O.)

More seriously, given the inventory of Canon L series full frame lenses I have I'd have to be crazy to get an APS-C camera and lose the wide angle capability that I've spent all that money for (the Canon 14mm rectilinear is one of my favorite lenses!)

Looks like I'd better get another 5D body before FF disappears!
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 07:14 PM   #12
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My pet peeve with many lenses is the falloff in the corners. I personally like the idea of FF glass on an APS-C body, just because of the flat field. The one exception would be for wide lenses. EF-S lenses make all the sense in the world at the wide end, just because of size, cost, and available ranges.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 07:30 PM   #13
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I'm no kool-aider but, which plays nicer with Red? aps-c or ff lenses?
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 09:11 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Jon Fairhurst View Post
My pet peeve with many lenses is the falloff in the corners.
Yeah, I'm not big on the vignetted look either. Thankfully, Canon automatically corrects the falloff for all their own lenses, so it's only the third party brands where you have to worry about it. (Then again, even with the correction you may have to worry about the increase in noise in the corners.)
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Old November 24th, 2009, 01:19 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Jim Andrada View Post
Heck, I still shoot 5 x 7 inch
5x7? That's like a point and shoot in comparison to my 8x10 daguerreotypes I do.... hehehe. Nice to see other large format people still around and on board for digital video Jim.
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