My preferred 7D Run and Gun settings at DVinfo.net

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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old November 23rd, 2009, 07:28 PM   #1
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My preferred 7D Run and Gun settings

I'm finding the 7D to be quite a handful managing exposure, focus, and framing for real-time/real-life video. This is complicated by lack of zebra and other tools I am accustomed to having on a dedicated video camera. I'm finding that my best "safe" settings to get good footage when I can't control the action and things are happening fast are:

1. Set the camera to Manual
2. Set the shutter to 30 - 60, depending on frame rate, lighting, and action
3. Set the ISO to Auto
4. Set the aperture so the brightest scene doesn't overexpose image for a given set-up, hopefully so ISO is South of 640. If I have lot's of light, use an ND filter to block it as needed.
5. Hit the "GO" button and let the ISO vacillate as needed to keep exposure normal.
6. Us noise reduction in post if ISO goes too high.

I find that when time isn't available to be picky, this gives good results most every time. When I try to "peg it" under battle conditions in full manual I'm doing good to get it as good 50% of the time, and sometimes I just plain miss. I'm working to improve my skills, but this method is pretty good and managing focus alone with this camera takes lots of attention in and of itself.

A close 2nd, perhaps even better with tricky lighting:

1. Set the camera to Av (using a pure manual lens the camera can't "read")
2. Set aperature to whatever level desired, using ND's as needed
3. Hit the "GO" button.

The camera changes shutter and ISO at it's whim, which can cause some stuttered movement in faster action if the shutter goes North of 80. The good thing about this method is if you press the shutter button halfway before starting, you can bias the exposure up or down while shooting to compensate for bright scenes (sand, white counters...) or down for dark scenes (stage lights, dark alley...) if you have the skills to do so while shooting.

Unlike the A1, changing the DSLR's snappy aperture to control light during filming isn't good, so allowing the camera to vary ISO may be a better compromise.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 08:08 PM   #2
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I'm still experimenting too.

I like to keep everything in manual.

For outdoor shooting I use a variable ND filter.

ISO is at 100
Shutter at 50 for 24p
Aperture is at whatever I need for DOF.
I adjust the ND filter for exposure, hold down the shutter to check exposure before recording. I like dead center or 1 below center.

Focus is what I spend the most time on. Going 5x and 10x for adjustment. Exposure can be tweaked in post, focus can't. I plan on experimenting with quick auto focus before the shot.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 08:20 PM   #3
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Ron,

There are several posts that suggest ISO 160, 320, 640, 1250.... are the best as others are claimed to be digital derivatives. You may want to snap a few pictures with the lens cap on at different ISO's and see if your mileage varies. It seems to be accurate for mine.

To be clear, I prefer all manual as well when time allows.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 08:28 PM   #4
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I remember seeing that post too. Didn't think ISO 100 would add any gain ?
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 10:54 PM   #5
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It seems like everyone is doing what I do, guestimating exposure. Sure could use Magic Lantern Zebra.
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Old November 24th, 2009, 06:25 AM   #6
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Brian,

The method I'm using (and I'm sure many others) does a pretty good job on exposure but you lose control of ISO. If you have fairly even lighting, it really doesn't vary very much and exposure stays very stable. I'm looking forward to zebra as well, but if you are in a shot with varying light, you still have a problem with the "clicking" aperature of the DSLR lens that this seems to overcome.
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Old November 24th, 2009, 11:43 AM   #7
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For the cinema buffs who want more detail and able to do color correction in post, dialing in Highlight Tone Priority (My Menu) suppresses ISO settings below 200. OTOH, dialing in ISO expansion adds a handful of extra settings.

But yes, for those requiring shallow DOF and fixed (low) ISO, they have yet another thing to do adjusting their variable ND filter. Momma was right - life isn't always fair...

Regards, Michael
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Old November 24th, 2009, 04:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Shealy View Post
Ron,

There are several posts that suggest ISO 160, 320, 640, 1250.... are the best as others are claimed to be digital derivatives. You may want to snap a few pictures with the lens cap on at different ISO's and see if your mileage varies. It seems to be accurate for mine.

To be clear, I prefer all manual as well when time allows.
http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/canon-eo...ing-video.html
ISO discussed. Also this website may be helpful. Canon 7D ISO versus noise test images Marvelsfilm’s Blog

Somewhat confused with ISO even numbers vs x 160, though.. any answers?

I do full Manual. Nothing auto at any given time.
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