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Old January 15th, 2010, 06:49 AM   #1
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What lenses are you using for weddings?

I have the 24-105 f4 but it seems to be too dark for weddings. I was thinking about the 24-70 f2.8 Any thoughts? Thanks.
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Old January 15th, 2010, 07:34 AM   #2
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Canon 70-200 f/2.8
Canon 16-35 f/2.8
Canon 24-70 f/2.8
Sigma 24-70 f/2.8
Canon 100mm f/2.8


Plus I have my rinky dinky little Canon 50mm f/1.8, which produce good images but not usable with a follow focus, or if you want to use any audio from the camera. The focusing is LOUD.

Combo of 7D and 5Ds.

Though if I could do it again I'd do something like a 70-200 and two fast primes. Ideally the 24mm f/1.4 and 50mm f/1.2. I find the only time you need to zoom is during the ceremony and speeches, and the 70-200 will probably be your weapon of choice for those scenarios.

By the way, check out the Sigma 24-70. Having used both, I am impressed with the Sigma. I know it's not a Canon L-series, but it's light and the image is awfully close to the Canon L for video.

Just my 2 cents :)
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Old January 15th, 2010, 07:35 AM   #3
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I also have the 24-105 and agree that its not sufficient for shooting in most reception venues. I've also tried some 2.8 lenses. The extra stop helps but you have to watch your focus due to the shallow DOF. I was ready to upgrade to some faster lenses but now I'm thinking that adding better lighting might be a better first step. For the price of one L series lens I can put together a very nice set of reception lights.
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Old January 15th, 2010, 02:24 PM   #4
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For weddings, primes are definitely the way to go. Light is THE problem of shooting weddings, and at f/1.2 - 2.0 you're laughing. It's a big investment, but you collect primes over time, and they do pay for themselves.

Our favorite lenses for weddings (all Canon L):
24 1.4
50 1.2
85 1.2
135 f 2.0 (great and "cheap")

Of course sometimes you need a zoom:
70-200 f 2.8
24-105 f 4.0 for outdoor stuff

If you can break the bank, get the 14mm f/2.8 for truly wide footage on the 7D.
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Old January 16th, 2010, 01:38 PM   #5
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I second everything Erik said. We shoot all primes and two 70-200's. That's for the 5D2; on the 7D, primes are even more important (due to noise and DOF differences).
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Old January 17th, 2010, 12:28 PM   #6
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I'm interested in hearing with those that have a prime set-up:

How do you manage the different lenses.

Do you know what lens you're using. Like lens 1 is for reception, 2 for ceremony etc... or are you doing multiple changes while the program is taking place. If so how do you quickly change. A gun slinger type belt for wedding videographers :)
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Old January 17th, 2010, 04:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Dufrain View Post
Do you know what lens you're using. Like lens 1 is for reception, 2 for ceremony etc... or are you doing multiple changes while the program is taking place.
Multiple changes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Dufrain View Post
If so how do you quickly change. A gun slinger type belt for wedding videographers :)
It only takes a few seconds (3-6). If you get good at holding two lenses with one hand, you can speed up lens changes a bit. Some of my colleagues do indeed use lens holsters, but I just use a bag. Some leave off the front and rear lens caps and rely on the bag/case to protect it, but I tend to take the extra time to put at least the rear lens cap back on with each change.
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Old January 18th, 2010, 04:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erik Andersen View Post
If you can break the bank, get the 14mm f/2.8 for truly wide footage on the 7D.
Or don't break the bank and get the Tokina 11-16

Tokina
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