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Old January 26th, 2010, 03:32 PM   #1
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Canon PROTECT Filter for the EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens

I just got my EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens today, reading the manual, it says to install the Canon PROTECT filter to seal the lens for Dust, Humidity, etc., do I need to buy that specific filter ?, or I can use any standard UV filter installed, currently I have installed the SIGMA DG UV 72mm filter, maybe that's enough ?, please could you confirm, thanks a lot
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Old January 27th, 2010, 12:55 AM   #2
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I just got my EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens today,
Great! You're going to love it. Beautiful, creamy bokeh on that one.

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reading the manual, it says to install the Canon PROTECT filter to seal the lens for Dust, Humidity, etc., do I need to buy that specific filter ?
No. Any threaded filter will complete the seal, including ND, pola, or other filters. (And with that lens, you will probably want an ND on there if you shoot in ample light).

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or I can use any standard UV filter installed, currently I have installed the SIGMA DG UV 72mm filter, maybe that's enough ?, please could you confirm, thanks a lot
Yes, even a standard UV filter will be enough. However, unless you are shooting in rain or at the beach or in some other dirty environment, I advise against using a UV filter. It will increase flare. This lens has less flare than any Canon 50mm lens. It would be sad to ruin that just for protection, IMHO. If you do want to use a UV filter, it helps to get a very high quality, and as far as I can tell, the one you got is excellent. (Personally, I use Hoya HMC.) And if you do use a filter, it will be vital to keep it absolutely clean at all times. (Whereas dirt and dust on the lens element itself is no big deal.)
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Old January 27th, 2010, 01:51 AM   #3
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Daniel, what type of filter would you advise if one really needed protection in front of the front element? We've been using UV's despite the ugly flares that pop up now and then.
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Old January 27th, 2010, 02:13 AM   #4
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Daniel, what type of filter would you advise if one really needed protection in front of the front element?
I've bought a bunch of the cheap single-coated filters from a half-dozen differnt brands, and I've noticed lower quality on those, but the expensive multicoated filters from Hoya, B+W, and Tiffen have all been about the same quality as far as I could tell. I prefer Hoya HMC the most, though, because I find that it is easier to clean. YMMV.
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 07:48 AM   #5
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Hi, just riding on this thread to ask a couple more questions, if you don't mind, since we're on the topic of filters.

I just bought Canon 7D and EF-S 17-55mm f2.8 (after hearing good reviews from here, and man, it is expensive in Singapore >.<). Pretty new in DSLR world and jumping into it in the hope of setting up a freelance event, wedding, corporate videography.

So....I definitely need a UV filter to protect this glass. A man from a photography store recommended B+W UV filter to go with this lens, since apparently it's a great glass and one shouldn't stinge on filter to protect it. That cost S$200 (Singapore dollars), compared to Hoya HMC (S$45). He mentioned Hoya is a lower grade filter and there are bounds to be flares and more obvious distortion when using that compared to B+W.

Well I'd really just like a filter primarily for protection, naturally without sacrificing much image quality (if any). Do you guys reckon there is a great difference between those two filters? Advantages vs disadvantages that you may know of? My heart tells me to go with Hoya ($45) - the cheaper option.

Suggestions are greatly welcome :)
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 03:10 PM   #6
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So....I definitely need a UV filter to protect this glass.
Personally, I don't consider them necessary at all; I avoid using them whenever possible.

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A man from a photography store recommended B+W UV filter to go with this lens, since apparently it's a great glass and one shouldn't stinge on filter to protect it.
The salesman is both right and wrong. While I feel there is little point in a protective filter unless you are in conditions of spraying water (etc.), he's right that it would be a big mistake to use anything but the best filter on such a nice lens. Even the best filter is going to degrade image quality (flare, etc.), but a cheap filter will degrade it much more.

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That cost S$200 (Singapore dollars), compared to Hoya HMC (S$45). He mentioned Hoya is a lower grade filter and there are bounds to be flares and more obvious distortion when using that compared to B+W.
He's correct. The Hoya HMC should be avoided. Of the filters available from Hoya, only the MRC is sufficient quality (the best).

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Do you guys reckon there is a great difference between those two filters?
Yes, there definitely is.

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Advantages vs disadvantages that you may know of? My heart tells me to go with Hoya ($45) - the cheaper option.
It would be a waste of money to spend hundreds extra on the 17-55 f/2.8 IS just to ruin the image quality with a cheap filter. It's better to use a quality filter or not to spend the extra money on the 17-55 in the first place. (Personally, I recommend the cheaper Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 VC instead, though the quality is a little worse.)
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Old February 4th, 2010, 10:27 AM   #7
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Thanks for your reply, Daniel.

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He's correct. The Hoya HMC should be avoided. Of the filters available from Hoya, only the MRC is sufficient quality (the best).
By Hoya MRC, did you actually mean DMC (Digital multi coated) or Super HMC?

In your previous previous post, you mentioned you'd prefer Hoya HMC the most since it's easier to clean. I'm guessing you're not talking about the same Hoya HMC that you suggested I avoid?

I went to the official Schneider optics (B+W) website and there's like a dozen UV filters available. I'd like to personally thank them for confusing newcomers into the DSLR world. Anyway, I noticed that the filters' mounts have either F-Pro and XS Pro on them. Do you know if either one is compatible with Canon 7D? As far as I understand it, only XS Pro has an additional front mount to attach lens cap or hood.

Sorry for the multiple questions there. I'm an eager-to-learn newbie :)

I'd be keen to get a UV filter soon and test out the difference between shooting with/without the filter, though.
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Old February 4th, 2010, 10:31 AM   #8
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I am using the following F-Pro B+W filters:

50mm f/1.2L : B+W 72mm UVA (Ultra Violet) Haze MRC Filter #010
24-105mm f/4L : B+W 77mm UVA (Ultra Violet) Haze MRC Filter #010
50mm f/2.5 Macro : B+W 52mm UVA (Ultra Violet) Haze MRC Filter #010

They are working great and my understanding is that they are MULTI COATED.

From B+W Web Site: CLEAR UV HAZE MRC (010M)

"This UV Filter blocks the invisible UV component of light from the sky, which can cause blur and to which many color films react with a blue cast. These filters should be called UV-Blocking Filters, because there are filters for technical applications that pass UV radiation and block all the other wavelengths. Nevertheless, the short term “UV Filter” has become established among photographers. UV Filters are ideal for photography in high altitudes (in the mountains), by the sea and in regions with very clean air. The pictures gain brilliance and disturbing blue casts are avoided. Because the glass is colorless, color rendition is not altered, aside from the elimination of the unwanted blue cast, and no increase in exposure is required. That makes a UV Filter very suitable as protection of the front element of the taking lens against dust, flying sand, sea water spray and the like, and it can be kept on the lens at all times. It is recommended for analog color and black-and-white as well as digital photography.

MRC (Multi-Resistant Coating) by B+W is not only an extraordinarily effective multiple layer coating, it is also harder than glass, so that it protects filters from scratches (for instance when cleaning the filters), and it is also water and dirt repellent, thus facilitating filter maintenance."

It seems they are good for Digital SLR cameras as well. They have to be GOOD QUALITY filters, I paid around $100 for each one.

Last edited by Bernard Rosenzweig; February 4th, 2010 at 12:19 PM.
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Old February 4th, 2010, 10:56 AM   #9
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By Hoya MRC, did you actually mean DMC (Digital multi coated) or Super HMC?

In your previous previous post, you mentioned you'd prefer Hoya HMC the most since it's easier to clean. I'm guessing you're not talking about the same Hoya HMC that you suggested I avoid?
OK, that was pretty dumb of me. I should have checked my camera bag before I posted. I have a bunch of Hoya S-HMC and I think they are good, but the ones that seem easier to clean are *B+W* MRC.

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Anyway, I noticed that the filters' mounts have either F-Pro and XS Pro on them. Do you know if either one is compatible with Canon 7D?
Yes, both are compatible.
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Old February 9th, 2010, 02:25 PM   #10
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Thanks for your reply, Daniel.



By Hoya MRC, did you actually mean DMC (Digital multi coated) or Super HMC?

In your previous previous post, you mentioned you'd prefer Hoya HMC the most since it's easier to clean. I'm guessing you're not talking about the same Hoya HMC that you suggested I avoid?

I went to the official Schneider optics (B+W) website and there's like a dozen UV filters available. I'd like to personally thank them for confusing newcomers into the DSLR world. Anyway, I noticed that the filters' mounts have either F-Pro and XS Pro on them. Do you know if either one is compatible with Canon 7D? As far as I understand it, only XS Pro has an additional front mount to attach lens cap or hood.

Sorry for the multiple questions there. I'm an eager-to-learn newbie :)

I'd be keen to get a UV filter soon and test out the difference between shooting with/without the filter, though.
Jimmy,

Sorry for the confusion on our site. We are working hard to clarify our UV filter options.

In short, the F-Pro mount is our basic filter mount and does not vignette on most lenses including your 17-55mm. The XS-Pro Digital filter is a slim mount ring that has front filter threads and should be used on full frame cameras like the 5D MKII or EOS MKIV with lenses wider than 18mm.

Our B+W MRC coating is the original multi-coating on the market and is great for repelling water and dust. The MRC coating also features 99.8% light transmission.

I hope that helps if you haven't already made a filter decision.

Thanks,
Ryan Avery
Schneider Optics
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Old February 9th, 2010, 07:31 PM   #11
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I do not have a Full Frame camera, I have the Canon EOS 7D (1.6 factor), and I have only full frame lenses, like the 24-105mm f/4L, 50mm f/1.2L and the 100mm f/2.8L Macro, can I still use the XS-Pro filters ?, thanks
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Old February 9th, 2010, 08:10 PM   #12
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XS-Pro filters will work fine for your camera and lenses but the F-Pro will meet your needs in this case.

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Old February 11th, 2010, 02:18 AM   #13
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Jimmy,

Sorry for the confusion on our site. We are working hard to clarify our UV filter options.

In short, the F-Pro mount is our basic filter mount and does not vignette on most lenses including your 17-55mm. The XS-Pro Digital filter is a slim mount ring that has front filter threads and should be used on full frame cameras like the 5D MKII or EOS MKIV with lenses wider than 18mm.

Our B+W MRC coating is the original multi-coating on the market and is great for repelling water and dust. The MRC coating also features 99.8% light transmission.

I hope that helps if you haven't already made a filter decision.

Thanks,
Ryan Avery
Schneider Optics
No sweat, Ryan. Appreciate your personal concern and explanation. I'd guess most professionals wouldn't have any issues with the descriptions listed in your website. It probably just seems confusing to me since I'm a newbie in DSLR photo/videography, and would like to get the basic equipment necessities.

I decided to purchase B+W 77mm UVA (Ultra Violet) Haze MRC #010 Filter - for both protection and daylight use. Daniel has a point - don't skimp on filters, especially on good lenses.

Ryan, now I'm just hoping that I'm paying extra (with B+W filters) for quality, not just brand name :)
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Old February 11th, 2010, 12:59 PM   #14
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I have seen multiple images from 5D MKII owners shooting at night using lower quality filters that have reflections from the front element surface being imaged on the backside of the filter. I sold these users MRC coated filters in all cases and they no longer have the issue.

If your use requires a filter, then you are right that you should buy good quality glass that matches your lens and coatings.

I'm sure you will be happy with your purchase.

Ryan Avery
Schneider Optics
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