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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old February 5th, 2010, 02:36 AM   #1
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What kind of sharpening do you use ?

Hey,
When I shoot on my 7D, I have my settings as flat as possible so I could do everything in post, but a lot of times I found the footage seems really soft.
So now I was thinking of doing some sort of sharpening onto it.
Do you also do it ? Now I tried the sharpen effect and unsharp mask, but I think the boundary between too little and too much is really small.
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Old February 5th, 2010, 09:59 AM   #2
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Old February 5th, 2010, 10:49 AM   #3
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Does that work for video? Or is it only photo sharpening in Lightroom / Photoshop?
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Old February 5th, 2010, 11:40 AM   #4
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Genuine Fractals ?
Isn't that for enlarging pictures ?
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Old February 6th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart Wierzbicki View Post
Do you also do it?
Personally, I prefer to avoid sharpening altogether, because it exacerbates aliasing artifacts. But if I was to sharpen, it would definitely be during in-camera processing, where the sharpening can be applied to the 14-bit raw image, instead of in post where all I have is the 8-bit compressed image to work with. Doing that will exacerbate the compression artifacts (on top of the aliasing).
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Old February 6th, 2010, 08:45 PM   #6
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Totally agree with Daniel, sharpen in camera. I'd just add that the extra rendering time required with a sharpen filter isn't fun.
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Old February 7th, 2010, 04:47 AM   #7
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Daniel has a point, but in general sharpening should only be applied on OUTPUT. Furthermore, different displays and different display resolutions require a varying amounts of sharpening. You can apply sharpening in Compressor and similar programs, though personally, I try to avoid it altogether by using sharp lenses with all artificial sharpening turned off.
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Old February 7th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #8
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I've generally never been a fan of sharpening BUT recently, there's been a good shot or two that i was going to purge from my bins because of tad-too-soft focus...yes, my talent moved...1mm...the horror!!

So what i do is mask an area, and sharpen a small patch, i.e: an eye... and it REALLY helps those tad-too-soft focus. Its more selective, you only have to do it a for short period of time to keep people in the moment, say at the beginning of the cut/edit.

As for sharpening in-camera, its doesn't really look so good on a large monitor. I find that reducing the sharpness half way, actually increases "the magic' that the camera produces. And setting the in-camera sharpness all the way down, begs for post sharpening, which doesn't make any sense!
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Old February 10th, 2010, 01:36 PM   #9
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That's why I stay mostly at +1 for in camera sharpnening. "0" is too much.

Edit: What I meant was no sharpening on this camera can be too much. I have to start at +1 or 2.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 03:21 PM   #10
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The lack of resolution these DSLR's produce they make up for with artificial sharpening which introduces a lot of aliasing... if this makes no sense or you don't believe it, ask Barry Green. I shoot with the sharpness all the way down on my 5D and sharpen in post if needed.
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