Is the 7D or 5D a professional level (wedding photography) still camera? at DVinfo.net

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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old February 19th, 2010, 09:14 AM   #1
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Is the 7D or 5D a professional level (wedding photography) still camera?

Or does it not even compare to some of the "dedicated" still cameras in it's price range?
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Old February 19th, 2010, 09:30 AM   #2
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Well, you're talking about two different price ranges and two different cameras.

The Canon EOS 5D Mk. II is a $2500 camera while the EOS 7D is a $1700 camera.

And both of them are indeed "dedicated" still cameras in every sense of the word. In terms of photographic capability, they actually exceed their predecessors: the EOS 5D Mk. II is an even better still photo camera than the previous version, the original EOS 5D. Both of these cameras were designed from the ground up to be still photo cameras, first and foremost.

The 5D Mk. II and the 7D are just fine for wedding photography; I've known some wedding photographers that use lesser cameras for that kind of work... after all, it's not the choice of camera that makes or breaks a photographer. Hope this helps,
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Old February 19th, 2010, 09:36 AM   #3
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The 7d is a prosumer camera, the 5D is a professional camera. This goes without saying that it is the person behind the camera that matters most.

If you google Manuel Librodo, he was producing very stunning work with a Point & Shoot camera and legend has it that a popular magazine was so impressed with his work with a point & shoot and provided him a DSLR.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 12:45 PM   #4
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Why is the 7D a "prosumer" camera?
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Old February 19th, 2010, 01:00 PM   #5
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The 5D and 7D can be classed as 'semi pro'. The true fully professional bodies in the Canon line-up are all all signified by the number '1', such as EOS1D, EOS1Ds etc., and in the Nikon line-up it is the single digit bodies such as Nikon D1, D2, D3 etc.

The cheaper semi-pro cameras such as Nikon D700 or Canon 5D Mark II are top-class cameras that are often used by professionals as second bodies or when lightweight bodies are needed. They are cheaper than the fully professional bodies, and not built to the same exacting standards.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 01:06 PM   #6
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Chris said it right, it's the person behind the camera. That said, I work at a fairly large wedding studio and the 5d is pretty much the standard for photogs on the canon side of things as most still shooters prefer the full frame. However for starters a crop body such as a 7d or 50d will do just fine as well. Your lens selections are more important than the body imho. The standard wedding "kit" I'd say around here is at least 2 bodies (most have a full frame with a cropper as a 2nd body), a good normal zoom (24-70 2.8 or 17-55 2.8 on a cropper) and a good telephoto zoom (70-200 2.8 IS) pretty much gives you everything you'll need on the day. Don't forget flashes as well. The 1d series are great however pricey and almost overkill for most wedding photogs.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 03:05 PM   #7
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Yeah, why is the 7D a "prosumer" camera? I think that designation actually belongs to the Rebel.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 03:16 PM   #8
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I honestly don not know how manufacturers designate prosumer from the professional gears. Cost? capability? Maybe someone can enlighten us.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 03:39 PM   #9
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Professionals require equipment that is built like a tank, robust and able to withstand the rigours of a daily routine where everything is chucked at it yet keep on working. This is why I prefer to pay more for professional equipment. Yes, a cheaper model is able to deliver the same results in controlled conditions, but more often we need a completely reliable and very tough tool to match the environments we work in.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 07:53 PM   #10
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This seems silly to ponder too seriously. The 7D's build quality, resolution, and 8 jpegs-a-second-for-apparently-forever shooting speed make it pro enough for anything I can imagine doing. And it isn't too shabby in low light, either.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 09:09 PM   #11
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Hi Justin, we make an effort here to take every question seriously and treat it as an education process. Some folks might not be familiar with the 7D and may have heard of it only by its model number. So it's not silly, certainly not to the original poster. Our goal is to share useful information. Thanks for understanding,
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Old February 19th, 2010, 11:42 PM   #12
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To the original poster... given that the 5D Mark II was the first digital camera ever used for the official presidential portrait, it is definitely professional enough for weddings. The 7D picture quality is not far behind. The lower cost is mainly due to the smaller sensor, but it also has some advantages, like better autofocus and a higher still shooting rate.

http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/eos-5d-m...-portrait.html

The 1D4 has slightly better quality and the best autofocus that Canon makes. The main reason for the higher price is weatherproofing, which isn't generally needed at weddings.
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Old February 20th, 2010, 12:16 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arif Syed View Post
Is the 7D or 5D a professional level (wedding photography) still camera?
Yes, they are both professional level. Most of the wedding photographers I know shoot the 5D2 and 5D with a bunch primes (and a few zooms).

In some ways, the 7D is more professional than the 5D2: viewfinder, autofocus, weather sealing, frame rate, build, etc. Aside from the larger sensor, I think the 5D2 has more in common with the 500D than the 7D (even the 50D has a more advanced autofocus). But I wouldn't have it any other way: with all those extra features, Canon would probably charge more for the 5D2, and I'm happy to get full frame at the price I have it. (Though I still hope Canikon will enter a price war with Sony and their sub-$2000 full frame camera).

Personally, I prefer the 5D2 for weddings. It gives me much more control over depth of field, performance in low light, and better contrast.
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Old February 20th, 2010, 01:11 AM   #14
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In practical terms, the greatest advantage the 5DMkII would have is in its ability to make full use of wide angles. They are both more than capable for professional wedding photography.
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Old February 20th, 2010, 01:32 AM   #15
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Yeah, I think there is a wide angle lens advantage too. While there are many wide angle lenses for the 7D (At least a half-dozen ultrawide zooms and double that number of wide zooms), I think the best wide angle choices are only available on full frame (especially for primes).
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