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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old March 21st, 2010, 01:18 PM   #1
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Manual exposure control methods - What do you use?

I havent settled on any one exposure method quite yet - still trial and error. But I wondered what everyone else is doing?
Especially if you are setting (guessing) an aperture with a shutter speed and then allowing the exposure to be adjusted by using the ISO in auto mode. So while the aperture you select may be off by a half-stop, using auto ISO will change to get you in the right exposure.

If you set other than in Manual (M) then the shutter speed - aperture - ISO are all set automatically which I do not use. I tend to work from the aperture I want and keep my shutter at default 1/60. Then I adjust ISO last but this where I start to guess - keeping the ISO as low a number as I can.

My second question is how many lock the exposure in, just in case the light changes or if you are moving the camera?

And finally - I believe you cannot see the histogram when in live view video mode - is this correct? I can only see this in still mode.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 02:58 PM   #2
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Auto ISO???? Turn that off for a start.

Use only Manual mode.

Use the built in meter.

Use different metering modes for different situations.

Use the histogram - no, it's not live but a quick review is all you need.

Choose the right combination of shutter, aperture and ISO to capture what you want how you want.

Above all, use your brain, your experience and your creativity. There's no correct exposure, but there are bad exposures.

:)
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Old March 21st, 2010, 03:00 PM   #3
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I use the reflective meter in the camera. As noted above, turn the auto stuff off--all of it. Be aware that the reflective meter can lie to you, just as it can in a traditional video camera; so you have to learn to use it properly.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 03:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Braeley View Post
I tend to work from the aperture I want and keep my shutter at default 1/60. Then I adjust ISO last but this where I start to guess - keeping the ISO as low a number as I can.
As I said, I work in Manual mode - setting aperture first and ISO last. But I'm not asking what I should be doing - I am asking what everyone else is doing so I can see if a similar pattern emerges.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 04:27 PM   #5
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Set ISO. Set Shutter Speed (1/50). Set Aperture. Adjust ND filters to suit.

Thats my method. I couldnt live without my Fader ND.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 04:36 PM   #6
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I have custom menu 2 & 3 set for 1/60th and 125th so I can cover 30 & 60 fps all in manual mode. I also use my still photography experience too adjust the meter with the exposure compensation settings for things like snow and bright sandy beaches of +.75 to + 1.00 ev or if I want to film on a white background, over light the background by 1 1/2 stops.

Video for me with the 7D is everything manual, never auto iso and manual focusing.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 05:26 PM   #7
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I set aperture and shutter for desired effect (DOF, deep or shallow; and motion/action rendition), ISO is AUTO but only briefly to see where the camera would try to set it at and then I set the ISO to that value OR adjust up or down watching the meter and watching exposure effect visually.

When it looks like what I want I leave it there and exposure is LOCKED at that value. It remains unlocked in manual mode ONLY if you leave ISO on AUTO.

Before proceeding with actual "takes", I'll record a short segment and review it using a totally light excluding LCD viewfinder "loupe" (usually the CAVISION with 6X eyepiece), and also review the histogram.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 06:14 PM   #8
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I am getting a flickering

When I zoom in or out I am getting a flickering. It almost looks like an auto exposure changing except that it isn't.
I have my settings at 1920x1080 30p 1/60 shutter and locked ISO and whatever fStop I happen to be on...all things in manual.
So nothing should be changing, yet I am getting a flickering in the viewfinder as well as on my imported stuff.
I really had not planned on zooming while I am rolling but if I wanted to I could not. It is very distracting and would not work in a final project. Is this something inherent with this chip set? Could it be the lens? Its a Canon 18-135mm.

It is almost like in a video camera the auto-knee is acting up. If you are in manual iris and you pan over a bright window the contrast changes but not the exposure...but it is very noticeable.

Is anyone else experiencing this?
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Old March 21st, 2010, 08:21 PM   #9
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What you are seeing is the lens changing aperture as you zoom, because your zoom lens is not a constant aperture lens.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 08:22 PM   #10
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Jim,

The 18-135 is not a constant aperture lens across the zoom range. Its widest aperture is f3.5 when at 18mm, and f5.6 when at 135mm. So what this means is as you zoom, if you had chosen an aperture wider than f5.6, it will change as you zoom. If you shoot at f5.6 or below you shouldn't see any change as you zoom. This is why most people like to get a constant aperture lens; like the Canon 17-55 f2.8..
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Old March 21st, 2010, 09:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Forrest View Post
When I zoom in or out I am getting a flickering. It almost looks like an auto exposure changing except that it isn't.
I have my settings at 1920x1080 30p 1/60 shutter and locked ISO and whatever fStop I happen to be on...all things in manual.
So nothing should be changing, yet I am getting a flickering in the viewfinder as well as on my imported stuff.
I really had not planned on zooming while I am rolling but if I wanted to I could not. It is very distracting and would not work in a final project. Is this something inherent with this chip set? Could it be the lens? Its a Canon 18-135mm.

It is almost like in a video camera the auto-knee is acting up. If you are in manual iris and you pan over a bright window the contrast changes but not the exposure...but it is very noticeable.

Is anyone else experiencing this?
You need a constant aperature lens like the Tamron 17-50. Also remember that zooming means something...it can imply a voyeristic feel or making the audience aware of the camera OR more likley...an amature photographer. Use zooms wisley! I don't ever zoom during a shot unless I want to imply one to the things I just mentioned!
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Old March 21st, 2010, 10:15 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
You need a constant aperature lens like the Tamron 17-50. Also remember that zooming means something...it can imply a voyeristic feel or making the audience aware of the camera OR more likley...an amature photographer. Use zooms wisley! I don't ever zoom during a shot unless I want to imply one to the things I just mentioned!
I'm a zoom hater, but when covering live events, not sure how it can be avoided without severely limiting yourself. A necessary evil sometimes.

For exposure, I use zebras. Oh wait, no I don't...but I do fantasize about them.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 10:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
You need a constant aperature lens like the Tamron 17-50. Also remember that zooming means something...it can imply a voyeristic feel or making the audience aware of the camera OR more likley...an amature photographer. Use zooms wisley! I don't ever zoom during a shot unless I want to imply one to the things I just mentioned!
I have no intention of using the zoom while shooting with this camera....especially with a manual zoom.

Last edited by Jim Forrest; March 21st, 2010 at 11:30 PM.
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