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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old May 26th, 2010, 04:15 PM   #1
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7D or 5D for film Short?

Can anyone tell me what they like and dislike about these cameras?

So far I am more impressed with the 5D's sample footage. I have not used either camera personally yet however. Looking to make a film short with one of these plus the Sony Ex1r.

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Old May 26th, 2010, 11:15 PM   #2
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I use both the 7D and 5DmkII. For low light or wide angle - 5D. The 7D is somewhat easier to keep in focus on RNG applications.

Both need a viewfinder or monitor to nail focus,.ND filters for controlling DOF. Magic Lantern adds a lot of functionality to the 5D, not yet available for the 7D.

One thing to keep in mind when reading reviews or recommendations on these cameras is what field the poster is coming from. Cinema guys and video guys tend to prefer the 7D, still photographers lean towards the 5D.

By the time you acquire all of the lenses and support equipment necessary, the camera cost becomes somewhat incidental.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 11:17 PM   #3
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So for the 7D do you have to get ND filters then? What does that cost? I have never heard about that part of the deal.
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Old May 27th, 2010, 01:38 AM   #4
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To properly answer the question we need more details. Is this for theater, for film festivals, for web delivery, etc? Is there going to be a lot of low-light footage? Is this your first film?

Since you say you have never used any of the DSLR's might I recommend starting with the T2i, then working your way up to the 5d.
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Old May 27th, 2010, 03:17 PM   #5
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For any DSLR to shoot video in bright light you need ND filters. I agree with the above post, if you're starting very basic you might be better off to get the T2i and see how that works out before spending a ton of money.

I also agree with the above comment that most cinema/video guys prefer the 7D and still photogs the 5D. The 7D's chip is almost identical in size to Academy 4-perf 35mm film, and to the Red's sensor as well, so depth of field characteristics are nearly identical. And, cinema and video guys are more accustomed to thinking in 35mm cinema lens terms as well, as opposed to still camera lenses--ie., for me a 16mm lens is pretty wide, while for still photography a 24mm is pretty wide; when shooting with 2/3" chip video cameras I considered 10mm my wide angle.

An advantage of the 5D is that it doesn't take as wide a lens to give you the wide angle. Conversely, an advantage of the 7D is it doesn't take as long a lens to give you the longer length effect (although a 50mm lens is always a 50mm lens, because of the crop factor, it gives you the area of an 80 with the 7D).

Another advantage of the 5D is that because of the bigger chip it's a bit better in low light. A disadvantage is that because of the bigger chip, it's more difficult to follow focus. The depth of field shallowness is a lot more extreme when shooting wide open. Overall, though, you're going to get excellent quality video with either camera, assuming you know how to use it and light for it and all. Somebody else mentioned that the camera is just the tip of the iceberg, and that is absolutely true. You don't just buy the camera and kit lens and think you're all set for professional video shooting. On the other hand, with ingenuity and skill you can make do with anything you've got.
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