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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old June 8th, 2010, 09:40 PM   #1
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LCD dead pixels

I was shooting with my Canon the other day and noticed two green spots on the lcd screen that I hadn't noticed before. It was a sunny day and I was using the z-finder. I thought I was being careful not pointing the lcd towards the sun, but apparently I wasn't careful enough. They don't seem to be affecting anything I shoot, but they are a bit distracting when shooting. The camera is under warranty, but I'm sure this falls under operator error. I'm just wondering, is this repairable? Thanks in advance.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 03:30 AM   #2
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Hmm, I'm not sure this was your fault at all or even sun damage. Sun damage to LCD screens usually won't cause a couple stuck pixels from what I've seen. More likely the screen would be roasted with permanent white spots and even some warping of plastic components like the resin screen cover is possible depending on the exposure time. LCDs may also darken over their entire area with prolonged exposure to UV light. Are they lit up green or dark? And how large are the spots? Maybe you could post a picture.

There are a couple threads in the 5D mkII forum relating to this and I know one of them has a picture of what this kind of damage looks like.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 06:38 AM   #3
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Just to clarify the term, that would be 'always on' pixels, not dead pixels.

The cause could be either the display itself or the driver; has nothing to do with pointing your lens toward the sun.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 03:42 PM   #4
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Adrinn, the spots are a light green and maybe a sixteenth of an inch in diameter. I will certainly try to post photos. Ervin, thanks for the clarification and thank you both for the info.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 03:53 PM   #5
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Ervin, just so I'm not misunderstood, it wasn't the lens I was concerned with directed at the sun, it was the lcd screen with the z-finder.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 04:58 PM   #6
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Rest assured, there is nothing you did to brake it - both dead pixels and always on pixels are an every day reality of LCD screens big and small. In the early 2000's when the LCD screens became more popular in televisions, some dead or always on pixels were accepted as "normal" depending on where they were located. Over the years these displays became better and better to the point where it is rare to see defetcts nowadays, but still, technology is better but not perfect.

Send it back to Canon or your wendor depending on your warranty stipulations.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 06:07 PM   #7
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Ok, one rough way to check if it's "spot damage due to heat" is by the spot edges. On the one hand, damage from the magnifiers often tends to look like someone drew on your monitor with an antialiased photoshop brush or in your case clicked in one spot with the brush. In contrast, pixels that are malfunctioning at an electronic level are usually rather binary in the nature of failure over a given area which makes for hard edges.

But I digress, it is hard to tell without seeing it, and Canon may notice if you send it in. I guess either way it wouldn't hurt to try, the worst that will happen is they tell you it's not covered. In answer to your question about repair, the LCD panel would need to be replaced most likely.
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Old June 10th, 2010, 03:47 AM   #8
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I had a number of stuck pixels on a new lcd monitor and someone advised me to carefully tap them with the eraser end of a pencil.

Worked great :)
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Old June 12th, 2010, 02:44 PM   #9
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Yellow blobs in LCD?

Just wondering what could have caused it? The only things I can think of are maybe it was dropped or sun got in the z-finder. The z-finder was never pointed directly at the sun it may have gotten some indirect light while carrying though. Just wondering if anyone has experienced something similar?

Thanks,

Gabe
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