First Full Scale Production on 550D at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD

Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 27th, 2010, 12:38 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 229
First Full Scale Production on 550D

This is my first full scale production filmed almost entirely on a borrowed 550D.


This production consisted of the following all performed by me:

Production
write basic script for production
obtain necessary consent from filmed parties
1 1/2 days on-site interviews w/HD cam, outboard audio, lighting
1/2 day remote audio multitracking (includes all mic's, xfrmr isolated mic/line splits, etc. FOH does nothing but mix FOH)
1/2 day multicam HD filming

Post
serve as filmmaker responsible for taking a request ("videotape our unity service") and converting that idea into a coherent visual experience where a completely independent, non-participating viewer can fully understand the story idea <--- (by far the most difficult part of this project)
sync all outboard audio with multiple cameras' footage
final mix & master 2.0 soundtrack
color correct & color grade all footage
edit all footage based upon script
render finished product for multiple platform compatibility (DVD, Youtube HD, Vimeo, Android, iPhone, etc.)
manage all license and permission requests from copyright holders


Not bad for a $750 camera...

Last edited by Aaron Courtney; July 27th, 2010 at 02:17 PM.
Aaron Courtney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2010, 02:29 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: England
Posts: 444
Hoping you can help me having just ordered one[550D] i am hoping my footage wont need C/C, i have always been happy with my current HV30s color,also how much footage did you get from one battery at best quality.
Martyn Hull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2010, 02:40 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Riga,Latvia
Posts: 129
Not a fan of the content , but you delivered the message nicely. Relay professional looking, for a novice aye such as my own.




But hey , i will ask you a pretty generic question . What lenses did you use ? :)
Gustavs Repse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2010, 02:42 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 229
well, i don't own the 550D i used for this shoot - i borrowed one from a friend to see how well it would hold up for my style of shooting. but if i remember correctly, you can either set a custom white balance or use the default (daylight). you don't have multiple presets for tungsten, fluorescent, cloudy, etc. so unless you take the time to set a custom white balance under all possible lighting conditions, you will probably need to color correct.

having a second battery is absolutely essential with this cam. you will not get much more than an hour of continuous shooting (well, as continuous as possible with the recording limits).

i used a 30-yr old Pentax SMC M 50/1.4 and used it wide open for almost all content
Aaron Courtney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2010, 03:37 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: England
Posts: 444
Canon EOS 550D Review | PhotographyBLOG it seems there are a number of WB options,just hoping the stock lens will do for now.
Martyn Hull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2010, 10:40 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 229
IMO for serious work, the stock lens is useless. fast manual primes is where the money's at with these machines.
Aaron Courtney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 28th, 2010, 11:15 PM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 4,100
If you've got the light, the stock lens will do. Not the best, not the worst. But yea, getting into some decent glass is where it's at for these cameras.
__________________
DVX100, PMW-EX1, Canon 550D, FigRig, Dell Octocore, Avid MC4/5, MB Looks, RedCineX, Matrox MX02 mini, GTech RAID, Edirol R-4, Senn. G2 Evo, Countryman, Moles and Lowels.
Perrone Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 01:14 AM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: England
Posts: 444
thanks This is just for my home use, if the 18-55mm stock lens is no good whats the point, basic cams come with fixed zoom lenses of various zoom ie 10/12 14x so the stock lens should be of this standard, i mostly film outdoors so if the stock lens wont give me decent film to start i am in a pckle as theres no more money for a while for extra lenses.

the kit lens looks ok in this film http://ninofilm.net/blog/2010/02/23/canon-550d-review/
Martyn Hull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 01:26 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 4,100
I have the stock lens (18-55) as well, and will be making judicious use of it until I purchase the primes I need. I shoot in rather dim conditions that I cannot light on regular occasions so I need faster glass. Were it not for that, I wouldn't be in any hurry to replace the stock glass.
__________________
DVX100, PMW-EX1, Canon 550D, FigRig, Dell Octocore, Avid MC4/5, MB Looks, RedCineX, Matrox MX02 mini, GTech RAID, Edirol R-4, Senn. G2 Evo, Countryman, Moles and Lowels.
Perrone Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 01:58 AM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
If you're shooting in daylight for personal use, the stock lens will do what you need it to do. With experience, you'll be able to decide if your projects and shooting style need something faster, longer, wider, sharper, or whatever.

It's best to go for lenses that meet your needs, rather than the lenses that others happen to like. And the stock lens is likely to meet your immediate needs for very little money.
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 09:32 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 229
Martyn, the stock lens is fine and resolves more than enough for the video functionality in these DSLR's...I'm pretty sure that point has been scientifically proven. FOR ME, however, the stock lens feels like cheap plastic compared to the manual lenses we used 25-30 years ago, probably because it IS plastic. I don't think there's any real "glass" in the lens at all.

I was raised on fully manual old school cameras that used real glass with real focus rings and real aperture rings. After spending so much time using lenses (shooting stills) with those physical properties, I refuse to give them up. I don't want ANY autofocus, autoaperture features because I want to have total control like we HAD to have before Canon released the EOS product 30 years ago.

So, for my style of shooting, this is what I have concluded - and that includes never using a zoom lens either. Obviously, this is just me, and Jon is absolutely correct. You should use your own preferences in your buying decisions.
Aaron Courtney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 10:03 AM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 4,100
Aaron,

I totally agree, and for much the same reasons. Though I don't believe the EOS is 3o years old. I was still using a rangefinder back then (and an AE1 when I got to school). I bought an EOS10s in the early 90s and that was a lot of fun.

Anyway, the manual lenses are a treat. However, for someone who's not cut their teeth on the glass we did, it's a luxury. As I get back into building my prime collection, I am reminded of how lovely they were. But we are working in an era where everyone wants auto-everything. No one wants to do things manually any more. I am a veritable dinosaur on set with my light meter. But it's amazing how I always get the shot without a histogram or waveform monitor within 20 miles. It's like magic to the young guys!

There's lots of ways to get things done. And the kit lens is a necessary evil. What ever happened to selling bodies with a piece of decent 50mm glass on it? At least you had ONE piece of fast glass in our collection to get you started.
__________________
DVX100, PMW-EX1, Canon 550D, FigRig, Dell Octocore, Avid MC4/5, MB Looks, RedCineX, Matrox MX02 mini, GTech RAID, Edirol R-4, Senn. G2 Evo, Countryman, Moles and Lowels.
Perrone Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 10:48 AM   #13
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Elk Grove CA
Posts: 6,838
I am using a lot of old glass with my 5D and my T2i, including some older zooms. I went with Nikon primes, because they all sport the same filter sizes, and are easily adapted to the cameras. They work on both cameras. I have a bag full of great older glass that I assembled for around $700.00. And odd lots also can get you into an interesting lens. I bought a 2 lens deal once, and the throw away lens included turned out to be a decent Vivitar 135mm lens. And along the way, I bought a 28-80 mm Pentax K mount Takumar zoom vintage 1980s dirt cheap, that has turned out to be a great walk around lens for my 5d, and that has a great macro feature too.

So your budget does not have to create a limitation to shooting with great lenses.
__________________
Chris J. Barcellos
Chris Barcellos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2010, 11:34 AM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 229
my fault Perrone, it was March 1987. and i do remember that period very well. a lot of pro's dumped their fully manual kits and jumped on the EOS bandwagon. as i've read recently, many of them are regretting that decision considering the rarity and the very special nature of many of those old, fast lenses - like the Pentax M 85/1.8. Thankfully, my dad kept his LX system and I get to enjoy using his lenses in ways that no one could ever possibly imagine at that time, LOL!

"I am a veritable dinosaur on set with my light meter."

Haha, my 8x10 kodak gray card is tucked safely in my blackbird case. sounds like we are right on the same page, bro!
Aaron Courtney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th, 2010, 06:09 AM   #15
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Posts: 13
Very good job

Not a fan of the content, but you did a very good job.
The shots are good, editing and structure is solid. It all flows perfectly.
The look is beautiful for this type of video.
I'm editing now a feature length rock documentary shot with the 5d. It's a challange to shoot documentary footage with these cams, and you sure did a good job.
Congrates!
Yaniv Glaser is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:38 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network