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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old August 13th, 2010, 03:52 PM   #1
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Buying a 7D

I am seriously considering buying a 7D. It would be my main still camera and secondary video camera.

After some research, I found these lenses: the "EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM" and the "EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM". I have read a lot of positive reviews from a photography standpoint. Would these be good lenses for capturing quality HD video?

Both of these lenses have an image stabilizer. Can this feature be used while shooting video to help smooth out camera movements?

Any suggested accessories?

Does the 7D have an audio input?

What compression format does it use for video?

Does it have a maximum clip size? If so, what is the maximum length a clip can be if recording in 24p HD?

My current camera (Canon SX10 IS) has a 20x zoom (5.0-100.0mm). Does that mean the 70-300mm lens has a maximum zoom of three times what my current camera is capable of?

Thanks!
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Old August 13th, 2010, 04:18 PM   #2
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- Good lenses, for outdoors (i use the 15-85 as my walk around), you'll need a faster one for indoors, and you might want a wider one as well

- I usually shoot on a tripod with the longer lenses, and have some sort of rig with a wider lens for hand held

- there is a whole plethora of accessories for these, I'd start with lenses, ND filters and stabilization

- yes, not great though, I use the Zoom and sync with the cameras audio

-h264

- clip size? depends on how big your cards are. 12 minutes length

- that depends on sensor size of the canon a little bit. with the 7ds sensor, I think your at about 480mm compared to a full sensor
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Old August 13th, 2010, 04:24 PM   #3
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Quote:
"EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM" and the "EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM". I have read a lot of positive reviews from a photography standpoint. Would these be good lenses for capturing quality HD video?
No. Doable, but in an ideal world you'd want a lens with a constant aperture.

Quote:
Both of these lenses have an image stabilizer. Can this feature be used while shooting video to help smooth out camera movements?
Yes, sometimes.

Quote:
Any suggested accessories?
Lots. Try the search button.

Quote:
Does the 7D have an audio input?
Yes. Mini-jack & it's crap. Again, hit the search button - all work arounds have been discussed in detail.

Quote:
What compression format does it use for video?
H264.

Quote:
Does it have a maximum clip size? If so, what is the maximum length a clip can be if recording in 24p HD?
12 mins.

Quote:
My current camera (Canon SX10 IS) has a 20x zoom (5.0-100.0mm). Does that mean the 70-300mm lens has a maximum zoom of three times what my current camera is capable of?
No. You need to read up on focal length, sensor size and angle of view.

Hope that helps.
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Old August 14th, 2010, 07:10 AM   #4
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The lenses you list are "consumer" lenses and they will be good for sunny 16 photography in bright conditions, video lenses can be a little softer than still photography lenses because of the medium the image is being reproduced on. Once your photographs are being sold for commercial use and reproduced on fine quality magazine paper, these lenses will show there softness.

You won't realize until your filming the impact of aperture on your footage, buying a DSLR for video, one of the attractions is shallow depth of field shots, lenses with f3.5-5.6 wont give that look.

I shoot mainly with primes and at times my f2.8 on a 24mm lens is not a wide enough aperture, when I switch to my Canon 50mm f1.4 I can save 200 worth of ISO which takes off a lot of digital noise.

My recommendation is buy a Canon 50mm f1.4 do some shooting, then buy lenses that fit a need you identify.

The 70-300 lens is a 4x zoom, if your looking for a long 12x zoom stick with a camcorder.
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Old August 14th, 2010, 02:44 PM   #5
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Your questions are answered well in the above posts.

Lenses are a very personal thing. And your style of shooting will dictate what you choose.

I find that shooting video with a DSLR is a totally different discipline than with a video camera. I have had dozens from Betacams to XDcams. I now have an EX3 and an EX1R a couple older Panasonic and Canon cams. I also have been shooting stills for a living since the 70's. In video you very rarely change lenses and it is hard to get SDOF unless you are in tele mode. Still lenses tend to be specialized unlike video lenses. The good ones are also very good. But you can pretty much forget about zooming in a shot, you really should not anyway as a general rule.

I also have a 5DmkII and a 7D.

My lens for the Canons are choices are:

17-40 L f4
24-70 L f2.8
70-200 L f2.8 IS
50mm f1.4
100mm f2.8 macro
100-400 L f4-5.6 IS

This gives me a real good range. I also have the 24-105 L f4, but I don't use that much for video.
The 24-70 and 70-200 are my most used lenses. They cover 90% of my needs. I find f2.8 is plenty for most SDOF situations.
The 50mm is very good value and great in low light.

I would consider an EF-S 10-22 mm lens as well for a 7D if you want super wide.
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Last edited by Olof Ekbergh; August 15th, 2010 at 10:46 AM. Reason: fixed 5d to 7d in last paragraph etc., thanks Michael
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Old August 14th, 2010, 08:43 PM   #6
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Olof,

I think you meant the EF-S 10-22mm or Tokina 11-16? That's what you'd want for the 7D. But for wide angle on the 5D you'd be looking at the EF 16-35mm f2.8.
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Old August 14th, 2010, 11:29 PM   #7
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Thanks for the replies.

So either the EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM or the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM would be a good lens to start with? The EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM looks like a good lens. I may have to pick one up when the budget allows.

Is the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM that much better than the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM to merit the extra $500?

When using a wide aperture, how does one bring the brightness to an acceptable level? Lowering the ISO, highering the shutter speed, using ND filters or a combination of these?

How many ND filters do you like to keep on hand?

Thanks!
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Old August 15th, 2010, 05:56 AM   #8
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Generally outdoors you would have to use an ND filter to get the correct exposure with a wide aperture.

Your ISO is likely to be at 100, but that won't allow you to shoot wide open on its own. Your shutter speed basically needs to be double your framerate to get the right look, so you can't just crank it up to cut out light, or you end up with stroby video.

The only thing to watch with ND filters is that they don't distort the colour balance. Even two samples from the same manufacturer can impart a different level of colour cast to the image.
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Old August 15th, 2010, 09:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Hunt View Post

How many ND filters do you like to keep on hand?

I use the Cokin style of holder and ND filters, so I have a 4x and 8x, I can stack these together as well and I can also use a polarizing filter, these are usually enough to get the shallow depth of field I'm looking for. Also there is a screw in variable ND filter which you turn like a polarizing filter to cut down.

Filming should be on full manual including focusing and iso etc, so you are "handcuffed" to a set shutter speed, which as someone has said is normally twice your frames per second, the only variables are ND filters, iso or aperture.
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Old August 15th, 2010, 09:48 AM   #10
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I would wait another month and see what the 60D is like, now is not a good time to buy a 7D.
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Old August 15th, 2010, 10:43 AM   #11
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If I was only getting 1 lens I would start with the 24-70 f2.8.

Next would be either a 70-200 or a fast 50, depending on your needs.

The older 70-200 is excellent, but unbelievably the new one is better. I would get the new one if I had the money, but the older could be a pretty good deal now, there should be some used ones showing up from people trading up.

Canon L glass tends to keep its value very well, so don't expect super bargains. But look around.

Below is a really good site for reviews of Canon glass etc..
Canon & Nikon Digital SLR Camera & Lens Reviews
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Old August 15th, 2010, 11:11 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olof Ekbergh View Post
If I was only getting 1 lens I would start with the 24-70 f2.8.

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I agree. I mainly use a 28-75 f2.8. I find I don't often need to go wider, but I always want more tele.
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Old August 15th, 2010, 11:38 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Hunt View Post
I am seriously considering buying a 7D. It would be my main still camera and secondary video camera.

After some research, I found these lenses: the "EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM" and the "EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM". I have read a lot of positive reviews from a photography standpoint. Would these be good lenses for capturing quality HD video?

Both of these lenses have an image stabilizer. Can this feature be used while shooting video to help smooth out camera movements?

Any suggested accessories?

Does the 7D have an audio input?

What compression format does it use for video?

Does it have a maximum clip size? If so, what is the maximum length a clip can be if recording in 24p HD?

My current camera (Canon SX10 IS) has a 20x zoom (5.0-100.0mm). Does that mean the 70-300mm lens has a maximum zoom of three times what my current camera is capable of?

Thanks!

As far as the lenses, you may want to consider the FD Canons. They are full manual, not AF there, but you can use them on a 7D no problem with and adaptor and, best of all, you can even get really fast 50mm 1.4 on ebay for less than $100. You may want to do some research on ebay (type in Canon FD lenses).

But remember, manual focus, manual aperture, no electronic communication between you 7D and the lens...

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Old August 15th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #14
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I know very few people using FD glass on the Canon's because the adapter required to make it work includes a glass element that reduces sharpness and quality. More people (MANY more) are using Nikon manual focus glass because the adapter to that requires no glass and a lot of early Nikon glass is just gorgeous. Especially the primes.
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Old August 15th, 2010, 12:15 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Perrone Ford View Post
I know very few people using FD glass on the Canon's because the adapter required to make it work includes a glass element that reduces sharpness and quality. More people (MANY more) are using Nikon manual focus glass because the adapter to that requires no glass and a lot of early Nikon glass is just gorgeous. Especially the primes.
This is my understanding as well.

As an alternative to Nikon, I suggest the Pentax Super Tak 50mm 1.4. $95 on ebay, $6 adapter. Nice lens. Focus is silky, way better than some big buck new lenses.
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