Shutter speed question at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD

Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 1st, 2010, 03:41 AM   #1
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Pembroke Pines, Fl.
Posts: 1,842
Shutter speed question

Since I began shooting with my 7d a year ago, I've always used the reccomened 1/50 shutter. I was shooting a wedding for another production company Saturday night, and the beginning of the reception was real dark. I was using my Tokina 2.8 on a steadycam style rig (indicam) and had to boost the iso quite high. The guy who hired me came over and asked me to drop the iso a bit and drop the shutter to 1/30. I couldn't see any problem while shooting at 1/30 ( although I never got to see my footage on a monitor after being captured).

I wanted to know if anyone has experimented with slower shutter speeds in these low light situations, and what problems have arisen. I would assume that it could cause motion blur although I didn't see any on the lcd. Also, anyone played with faster shutters and if so, what are the results?
Bruce Yarock
Bruce S. Yarock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2010, 04:36 AM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 259
IMHO, lowering the shutter looks better than upping the ISO
1/30 is no problem
Chris Westerstrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2010, 02:25 PM   #3
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Pembroke Pines, Fl.
Posts: 1,842
Thanks, Chris. What I'd still like to know is under what conditions would a slower shutter be too slow, and what would the negative results?
Bruce Yarock
Bruce S. Yarock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2010, 03:07 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 50
Lowering the shutter speed should be the last thing you should do to add light. You will notice more motion blur and less crisper image. I only mess with shutter speeds for stylistic looks. During the 35mm adapter era, some people including myself been forced to lower shutter speeds for just a little more light. But if you do that, you would do it to the whole film so the eye adjusts naturally to the 1/24th look. I would rather get a faster prime like a canon 24mm 1.4 lens. But do yourself some tests and look at the difference in motion blurs, let that be the deciding factor.
__________________
Dp Reel http://www.visualcinema.com/reels/ Rentals in NYC http://www.visualcinema.com/rentals/cameras/ Scarlet-X SN#634 "HEXTALL"
Jonanthan Carr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2010, 05:35 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 69
Lowering the shutter speed introduces more motion blur, so if you are shooting any fast action, it is generally not recommended. I would rather lower my shutter to 1/30 or 1/24 rather than up the ISO or the gain because this introduces more video noise. I find that if a scene is a normal scene with no super fast movement, lowering the shutter is perfectly fine.

That being said, I think 1/24 is the lowest you can go before you start to get the blurry slow motion look. I wouldn't go 1/15. The 7D will only let you go to 1/30, so this isn't an issue. I wonder why they don't give super slow shutter speeds in video mode...?

Upping the shutter speed gives you almost zero motion blur and sharp edges to everything, similar to the D-Day scene at the beginning of Saving Private Ryan. It also reduces the amount of light coming into the camera, so you need a lot of light, like outdoors or a very brightly lit scene. Saving Private Ryan made it popular beyond believe, to the point I think it's been way over-used in the past 15 years, so I tend to stay away from it.
Gabe Spangler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2010, 05:53 AM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Pembroke Pines, Fl.
Posts: 1,842
Thanks for the info, guys. I've never really fooled with the shutter on the 7d's, and this was an issolated incident. Back when I used to shoot a lot of weddings I was using my Canon H1 and A1. Sometimes during the dancing (especially techno) I'd drastically lower the shutter to create a motion blur, stroby effect.. I did that to give the editor another look and feel ( and also out of boredom).
Maybe when I have some free time, I'll do some tests with the 7d. I may even have some of what I shot on Saturday in 1/30 on one of my cf cards.

Bruce Yarock
Bruce S. Yarock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 2nd, 2010, 09:19 AM   #7
Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 4,449
As long as nobody is moving very fast, you can get by with a 1/30, and lots of wedding video producers do that, I've read. If the camera is relatively static and there's not a lot of motion from side to side in the frame, nobody will ever notice. But if you go outside and shoot cars driving by at 1/30, you'll start seeing issues.

I've done the same thing you did, use slow shutter to create an effect, not with a DSLR but with a DSR500 a few years ago. I was doing a promo for the film festival and we were making a point about having more films in a week than anybody could see. I shot this couple going from theater to theater and did it all with really slow shutter. On one shot I panned with the couple as they walked by fast, so they stayed in focus and the background blurred out and streaked. A very cool effect. Then I did the opposite, held the camera steady so the background stayed sharp and the couple blurred and streaked.

So you can use a slow shutter speed creatively, but it isn't something you'd normally do.
Bill Pryor is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:44 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network