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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old November 24th, 2010, 01:58 PM   #1
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Which "standard" lens?

Hi all,

I would like a prime lens around the 50mm equiv. for my T2i, for pictures and video.
I already have an old Tokina MF @ 2.8 but I find there is not enough background blur... so I need something faster and with AF.

So the list is:

Canon 35mm f2
Sigma 28mm f1.8

I could maybe stretch the budget to these if anyone has good enough comments(!)

Sigma 30mm f1.4
Canon 28mm f1.8

Any other ones Im missing under 500$?
Any input is welcome...


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Old December 1st, 2010, 10:33 PM   #2
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I think most Canon owners will tell you that the Canon 50mm (which is closer to an 85mm b/c of the crop factor - at least when compared to the full frame Mark II) 1.8mm for $100 is one of the best bets in all of camera-dom.

Fast, decently built, light, widely available - and did I mention it's $100?

I don't personally own the Sigma 30mm f1.4, but I've heard good things, it's fast as heck, and the 30mm works well for a wide variety of shooting situations. I don't know about it's cost though....

But you can't go wrong with the Canon 1.8 for the money.
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Old December 11th, 2010, 08:54 PM   #3
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there are any number of older manual 50 F1.4's out there for around $100 or so + EOS adapter for another $15-25 that would get you there... unless you want a wider lens. there are a number of 1.8-2.0 lenses out there that can be had for almost reasonable amounts..
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Old December 17th, 2010, 07:59 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Vincent View Post
I think most Canon owners will tell you that the Canon 50mm (which is closer to an 85mm b/c of the crop factor - at least when compared to the full frame Mark II) 1.8mm for $100 is one of the best bets in all of camera-dom.

Fast, decently built, light, widely available - and did I mention it's $100?

I don't personally own the Sigma 30mm f1.4, but I've heard good things, it's fast as heck, and the 30mm works well for a wide variety of shooting situations. I don't know about it's cost though....

But you can't go wrong with the Canon 1.8 for the money.
What is the name of the adapter for the 50mm? Can it be found at B&H? I would like to use this lens with my T2i.
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Old December 19th, 2010, 12:21 PM   #5
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Brian,

If we're talking about the Canon EF 50mm f1.8 there is no adapter needed to fit any EOS camera. The lens is $99.95 at B&H which makes it pretty much a "no brainer". Some complain about the build quality (plasticky) and the position of the focusing ring (at the very front of the lens), but for the money it is a really sharp lens with a very useful wide aperture.

It does get a bit "softer" at max aperture (characteristic of a lot of lenses) but for me this is a plus. In most cases where I use the widest aperture for the selective focus that comes with shallow depth of field, I also appreciate a touch of slightly softer rendition.

I have the original version of this lens with metal barrel and focusing ring where we are used to finding it. Optical performance the same and this is a very useful lens "in it's place".

I just "pulled the trigger" and ordered the EF 28mm f1.8 for something with a shorter than "portrait length perspective" and still wide aperture for marginal lighting situations.
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Old December 19th, 2010, 03:07 PM   #6
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I have the sigma 30mm 1.4 and it is awesome. Very sharp and feels good, it's roughly 50mm equiv and feels better than the Canon 1.8 (which feels is crappy), or the Canon F2 30mm.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 12:28 PM   #7
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50mm on a full sensor is very close to how the natural eye sees the world.
that's about a 28-30 mm lens.

That'd be my starting point for primes.

For a standard walk around lens, something along the lines of 17-50 or so will get you a solid wide, good mids and decent portrait shots. It covers a lot.

That'd be my starting point for zooms.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 01:37 PM   #8
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You cannot go wrong with the Plastic Fantastic (Canon EF 1.8 50mm). Just buy two for when the first one falls apart in your hands after a couple years! Actually, I've used mine on three different Rebels over 5 years and it still works great, so don't believe everything about the crappy build quality (it does feel cheap and light, but for $100, who cares?)

Plus, limiting yourself to a prime lens forces you to think more and be creative, IMO. I think of it like learning to drive stick. Sure automatic (aka zoom lens) is easier, but it can become a crutch that prevents you from trying and learning new things because its just too tempting to fall back on it in every case.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 10:22 AM   #9
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Thanks for the input. I think I'll pick up one of the Canon 50mm. I currently have the kit 18-55, which is good for photo work but is too slow a lens for available light video work. Also, is there a dedicated lens hood for the 50mm? From the picture it looks as though the lens has threads only, no bayonet like my kit lens.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 04:39 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackson Hager View Post
Plus, limiting yourself to a prime lens forces you to think more and be creative, IMO. I think of it like learning to drive stick. Sure automatic (aka zoom lens) is easier, but it can become a crutch that prevents you from trying and learning new things because its just too tempting to fall back on it in every case.
Not to mention that you will simply get better images from a prime lens than a zoom of similar quality. Good article comparing the two: The Forgotten Lens
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 09:43 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Tori View Post
Thanks for the input. I think I'll pick up one of the Canon 50mm. I currently have the kit 18-55, which is good for photo work but is too slow a lens for available light video work. Also, is there a dedicated lens hood for the 50mm? From the picture it looks as though the lens has threads only, no bayonet like my kit lens.
For the Canon EF 50mm f1.8 I use a "generic" collapsible rubber lens hood, does fairly well at keeping stray light off the lens surface in addition to providing a bit of a "bumper" out front.

UPS delivered my EF 28mm f1.8 and Hoya Pro 1 UV filter for it about 7PM last night. 5 minutes before we were going to drive around to see Christmas lights. That lens is FANTASTIC for a fast, low light lens with normal perspective. It's going to see a lot of video use.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 05:34 PM   #12
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I would get the Canon 28mm or 35mm, it depends on what you have already. If you want more zoom get the 35, otherwise 28 is just as good.

I have Sigma 30mm and Canon 50mm 1.4. The canon is a bit faster in AF and more accurate. The sigma has slower AF.

But for video purpose, they are all great lens. I use the Sigma a lot for filming, it has a razor thin DOF and very sharp.

As for color, they are very similar but everything you film on dslr has to correct in post anyway.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 03:37 PM   #13
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I would say if you are not a serious videographer and would still like to take great photos I would get a zoom lens with a constant Fstop of 2.8 or faster. I like to shoot photography as if I were a soldier in the middle of the war where my camera is my gun and every great shot I see is the enemy. If i'm not fast i'm dead.

Sometimes using a set of primes is like bringing a musket to battle. A good example of a battle would be say a wedding...Be prepared.

However if you are going to be using your camera to do some more relaxed shots or more contained video then primes are the way to go.
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