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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old December 9th, 2010, 02:54 PM   #1
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Help me spend $3000

I started out doing this as a hobby, but it's picked up enough to be a legitimate supplemental income, if not heading towards primary income - so I want to legitimize myself as more than a hobbyist. Anyway, $3000 is about what I've saved to get some add-ons. First, what I do is wedding videography, promos, etc. The basic stuff. But, I'm also doing a lot of photo sessions on the side - so I want stuff that works for both (with the exception of a few things).

What I have:
Canon 7D
Sigma 18-55 2.8
Sigma 70-200 2.8
Canon 50mm 1.4
Zoom H4N
Sony UWP V1 Lav Set
430EX II Flash

And then some odds and ends (bags, monopods, tripods, etc).

I have about 3K to spend, and obviously I could go broke on glass alone, but wanted to make sure I had a good range of stuff.

Things I was thinking about getting:
- A wide lens (Tokina 11-16?)

- A mid-range lens (something like a Canon 24-70 2.8 or a 24-105 f/4 L) -- or should I save money and get a Sigma 24-70? How big of a difference does an L lens make over a brand like Sigma to the people looking at the end result? If I got this, and a wide lens, is there any need for the 18-55 I currently have?

- A CMR Blackbird -- would you rather have a stabilizer or a shoulder mount....or is there a reason for both?

Anything else? What are the basic, getting-started things? Thanks all!
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Old December 9th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #2
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Some things.

Steve,

You should get the Glidecam 2000 HD or similar.

Slider like the DP Slider V-720. A must have when your doing weddings. ( you will need to add legs and a quick release to it)

L glass in my experience is always the better way to go.

The Tokina is a must have too and it does really well in low light for weddings. A must have.

Reception lighting. Ex. Bescor 50watt light, plus stand adapter, stand and battery. I use these before I go to a on board light and they make my dancing scenes, speeches, first dances look amazing.

I also own Comer 1800 which my assistant holds up like a reception light for the split seconds you need light. This makes all of our hotel getting ready shots look so much better when your facing big windows. A must have.

I'd perhaps sell your Sigma 18 lens and get the Canon 17-55mm. I live on that lens.

Another important lens is a Macro. I have the 100mm L version and I use it for super closeups of jewelry, rings, notes written by the couple and even during ceremonies. LOVE IT!!! Worth the money.
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Old December 9th, 2010, 03:36 PM   #3
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Hi Steve,

I'm also in the wedding film business. In the past year I've switched over to DSLR's completely. I find that the tools which best give me the shots I want are done with a slider & glidecam.

For the slider i built it myself off the glidetrack design for about $160.00. I then put feet on it and a QR plate on it. Make sure you have a heavy duty tripod head that can handle the weight. (ZazaSlider Instructions)

The glidecam is an HD 2000 which is perfect for a 7D w/ battery grip.

I personally would not get a shoulder mount. I would go for the Manfrotto 561BHDV-1 Fluid Video.

Look at the Sigma 30mm 1.4 I live on this lens, it's the lens of choice for glidecam.

For my wide shot's i use a Canon 15mm 2.8 It's a fisheye but gives a great effect when used right. It makes boring churches and reception halls really come to life. I also sometimes use it on the Glidecam as well.

If you want to add more to your photography side I'd sell your 430ex and buy two 580EX flashes. Then buy some wireless ettl transmitters from Radiopopper. Radiopoppers are small and easy to use with amazing range and speed!

-Aaron
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Old December 10th, 2010, 04:45 PM   #4
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What about a tripod and lighting? You might want to consider a matte box for your ND filters unless you already have threaded ones.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 12:29 PM   #5
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Steve, do you have a follow focus or monitor?

Those would be top of my list
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Old December 17th, 2010, 05:51 PM   #6
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Tokina 11-16 is an excellence lens, there is a slight distortion at the corner but it creates a nice effect on glidecam.

As for stabilizer, if you have strong hand and shoulder, the glidecam 2000 is a good choice, otherwise you will have to spend more for the Steadicam Merlin. BH currently has a 100 off for the Merlin.

I wouldn't get a shoulder mount, I had one and sold it. The reason is that the should mount reduce the mobility to get interesting angle. I would get a monopod. I have MA561BHDV1, one of the best purchased I have made.

slider is also quite important too, you can either make one for cheap or buy one.

I would get a Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro, I bought a used one on ebay for 280, I use this lens a lot from macro and portrait, to filming the ceremony.

Another lens to get is a Canon 35mm or 28mm, the sigma 30mm 1.4 is also a good choice, I have both lens, but the sigma auto focus is slow and off focus quite often compare the the Canon lens.

I would also invest in a second body, the 60d would be a good choice for your budget.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 07:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Westerstrom View Post
Steve, do you have a follow focus or monitor?

Those would be top of my list
Don't have either. Can you shoot me some links or names of some good ones?
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Old December 21st, 2010, 07:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Yip View Post
Tokina 11-16 is an excellence lens, there is a slight distortion at the corner but it creates a nice effect on glidecam.

As for stabilizer, if you have strong hand and shoulder, the glidecam 2000 is a good choice, otherwise you will have to spend more for the Steadicam Merlin. BH currently has a 100 off for the Merlin.

I wouldn't get a shoulder mount, I had one and sold it. The reason is that the should mount reduce the mobility to get interesting angle. I would get a monopod. I have MA561BHDV1, one of the best purchased I have made.

slider is also quite important too, you can either make one for cheap or buy one.

I would get a Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro, I bought a used one on ebay for 280, I use this lens a lot from macro and portrait, to filming the ceremony.

Another lens to get is a Canon 35mm or 28mm, the sigma 30mm 1.4 is also a good choice, I have both lens, but the sigma auto focus is slow and off focus quite often compare the the Canon lens.

I would also invest in a second body, the 60d would be a good choice for your budget.
I have a monopod (680B with a 494RC2 head). Is the one you listed that much better? Do the legs help THAT much? I've always wondered about that one.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 06:18 PM   #9
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my initial answer to you is "yes, by miles"

Apparently the new model is coming out in Jan according the BH.

Here is my long answer.
I used to think why would I spend 300 bucks on a monopod with only one leg whereas I could spend that much on an entry level tripod that might come with a fluid-head and dolly and it has THREE LEGS! So I bought a monopod with three aluminum sticks at the bottom and a $60 fluid head. It was good for the price, and it does somewhat stand on its own. But I wasn't quite happy with that setup. Ironically I lost it after one used at a wedding.

Eventually I pull the trigger because many professional were using it. Honesty, when I first see it in my hand, I was sold. What makes the legs different than the other monopod is that the rotation movement is located at the legs by which it is capable to move in any direction. The legs are able to grip the ground firmly so the footage is very stable. Specifically, the ballhead is built upside down at the leg, one side is the leg, and the other side is the monopod.
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