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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old December 15th, 2010, 12:01 PM   #1
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Lens for use on GlideCam

Hey Kids...

I am thinking of getting a GlideCam for the 7D and am looking for some ideas on the best lens to "glide" with. Obviously the issue is the exposure combination and deeper DOF. In my work I use a combo of the Canon 50/1.4...Tokina 11-16 Wide...a Canon Macro...and a Canon Telephoto. I have a selection of ND filters as well.

I bought the 7D body only so I have no GP lens per se. What would be a good choice for general shooting on the GlideCam where I can sort of dial in a reasonable focus and go?

For example in a work application it would be following medical people around in a hospital setting...tracking shots around patients being examined or moving around...that kind of stuff.

Thanks.
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Old December 15th, 2010, 01:17 PM   #2
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The wide angle would be best. I use a 5D with mostly a 24mm prime for most Steadicam shooting. That would be about like 15mm on your Tokina. Sometimes I'll use a 35mm, which would be close to a 21 or 22 mm on the 7D. Wider is always easier.
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Old December 15th, 2010, 01:39 PM   #3
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Focus is sort of a new wrinkle in the small stabilizer meets large sensor world. You guys have to stick with wide angles and deep stops to produce decent images. Sooner or later there will be a cost-effective solution for all of this (I know it's not my $40K Preston)!

However, once you get past the focus issues, it's often believe that wider=easier for Steadicam and that is often not the case. It's perhaps more forgiving in certain aspects, but including so much architecture in the shot tends to draw attention to the horizontals and the verticals and horizon becomes even more of a "thing".
I have personally felt that the sweet spot in focal lengths that are the easiest are 25-40mm (that being cine, so think of those focal lengths on a 7D). Longer than that gets tricky as the touch has to become that much more delicate, however at significantly longer lengths (100mm and up), you are often framing closeups which have a certain amount of allowable movement, and horizon is essentially a non-issue.
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Old December 15th, 2010, 02:43 PM   #4
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So using a 7D, would a 17-40 L series Lens be good?

Also, is it best to stick focus on infinity when using a stedicam?
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Old December 15th, 2010, 10:22 PM   #5
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...but there are excellent examples of Steadicam flying with a EF 14 mm f/2.8L II.
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Old December 16th, 2010, 07:12 AM   #6
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I always use my Tokina 11-16 and my fish eye. I can use my 24-70mm with additional weights but this is very heavy
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Old December 28th, 2010, 03:45 PM   #7
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I do use the Tokina 11-16 as well as the Canon 17-55 on my HD2000, both lenses perform very good and the weight is easily handable.
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Old December 31st, 2010, 12:17 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard D. George View Post
...but there are excellent examples of Steadicam flying with a EF 14 mm f/2.8L II.
Concur! I rented this lens and used it with great success. It is a fantastic partner for Steadicam work. Not cheap, just good. I haven't used the zooms that cover this range but I suspect they are good as well.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 08:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Davison View Post
I always use my Tokina 11-16 and my fish eye. I can use my 24-70mm with additional weights but this is very heavy
Hey Tim,
What fisheye are you using?
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