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Old February 18th, 2009, 02:47 PM   #1
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Do Image Stabilization lenses make a difference?

Has anyone done any tests with any of the Canon IS lenses in terms of video yet? If so, what have you found? Are they worth the extra money, or does it not make a difference?

How loud is the IS noise with the on camera mic?
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Old February 18th, 2009, 02:52 PM   #2
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Do Image Stabilization lenses make a difference?

I have found that the image stabilizer caused the image to judder when panning or tilting the camera. so I always turn it off, when shooting video.
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Old February 18th, 2009, 03:05 PM   #3
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It's the only way to shoot handheld (literally).
I've been swamped but I'm going to be posting two pieces I just shot all handheld with IS.
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Old February 18th, 2009, 03:21 PM   #4
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YES!!!!

I just completed a 4 day shoot using a variety of Canon lenses, including the 28-300. The footage would be unusable if it weren't for IS.

Cheers,

Sterling
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Old February 18th, 2009, 04:37 PM   #5
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Thanks guys. I feel better about just buying the 24-105L IS !

Serling, you are talking about the big white 28-300L, right? Because of the weight/balance, is it possible to handhold that at any significant (100mm+?) length and get a steady image? Just curious as I've toyed with buying it.
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Old February 18th, 2009, 04:58 PM   #6
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Yes, the big white lens is what I used, among other Canon IS lenses. They all tend to be big and heavy (most are white).

At 100mm, it should be manageable. If you're not going beyond 100mm, then get a smaller lens. It will probably be faster too.

I also used an automatic monopod, which REALLY HELPS, unless you are running while shooting. Manfrotto by Bogen Imaging | 334B Automatic Monopod | 334B | B&H

With a quick grip squeeze, you can instantly adjust the height up or down. I am 6'7" and at its highest setting, it was taller than me.

You'll want to add a head to it. I liked the ball head, of which there are several available: Manfrotto by Bogen Imaging | 486RC2 Compact Ballhead | 486RC2

Cheers,

Sterling
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Last edited by Sterling Youngman; February 18th, 2009 at 06:52 PM.
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Old February 18th, 2009, 06:50 PM   #7
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Dylan you really can't go wrong with the 24-105. Really great IQ across the board and the IS really works for filmmaking. If it had manual aperture, it would be on my camera most of the time (except real low light situations or when I need more bokeh). As it is, I'm forced to use Nikon primes more than I'd like - a shame given how nicely the 24-105 matches with the 5DII.

If the lack of control that Canon delivered with this camera is all we ever get, then the 24-105mm is, unfortunately, also the last Canon lens I'll ever buy.
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Old February 18th, 2009, 11:17 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dylan Couper View Post
Has anyone done any tests with any of the Canon IS lenses in terms of video yet? If so, what have you found? Are they worth the extra money, or does it not make a difference?

How loud is the IS noise with the on camera mic?
Hi Dylan, I don't think anyone addressed the IS noise issue, and it is very loud with the on camera mic. Having said that, I do have the 24-105 and think it's a great lens, you just have to either not use the audio, or get it from another source.
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Old February 19th, 2009, 06:35 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Jim Giberti View Post
It's the only way to shoot handheld (literally).
I've been swamped but I'm going to be posting two pieces I just shot all handheld with IS.
Amazing then that there's ever been a TV industry before IS was invented then! Of course you can shoot handheld without IS, most pros still do as it's not an option on most broadcast or cine lenses. It is helpful though when handheld.
And of course when panning/tilting on a tripod it's completely useless.
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Old February 19th, 2009, 07:45 AM   #10
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So, on an IS lens you have the option of turning the IS on or off?

Also, I noticed a couple of the posts here are for Canon lenses. The IS is still helpful for Nikon lenses?

So, if IS is helpful, then you should generally buy lenses that are IS or AIS, but generally not S? ...I take it IS or AIS is generally preferred for stills too, right?

Thanks. Trying to sort out all this nomenclature is pretty challenging.
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Old February 19th, 2009, 09:06 AM   #11
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When you shoot with a IS lens and the setup is on a tri-pod you should turn the IS to OFF
or you will see issues within your footage...
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Old February 19th, 2009, 09:10 AM   #12
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When you shoot with a IS lens and the setup is on a tri-pod you should turn the IS to OFF
or you will see issues within your footage...
Generally, this is true, but not always. It depends on what and how you are filming. For example, you might be on shore and filming a boat, bobbing around in the water. You might want to switch IS modes and keep it on.

-S
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Old February 19th, 2009, 09:15 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Sterling Youngman View Post
Generally, this is true, but not always. It depends on what and how you are filming. For example, you might be on shore and filming a boat, bobbing around in the water. You might want to switch IS modes and keep it on.

-S
Or if it's very windy and you're locked off on the subject.

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Old February 19th, 2009, 09:17 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Joshua Fulton View Post
So, on an IS lens you have the option of turning the IS on or off?

Also, I noticed a couple of the posts here are for Canon lenses. The IS is still helpful for Nikon lenses?

So, if IS is helpful, then you should generally buy lenses that are IS or AIS, but generally not S? ...I take it IS or AIS is generally preferred for stills too, right?

Thanks. Trying to sort out all this nomenclature is pretty challenging.
1) IS is Canon's term for Image Stabilising. You can turn IS on or off, and on some lenses you can also turn it on or off for just the horizontal or vertical components. So you could keep IS on the vertical only, allowing you to do horizontal pan.

2) VR is Nikon's term for Image Stabilising (short for Vibration Reduction). If you put a Nikon lens on a Canon body (using an adapter), VR won't work. Likewise, if you twist a Canon IS lens so the contacts are disconnected, you lose IS.

3) 'AIS' is a type of Nikon lens, just as 'L' is a type of Canon lens. AIS has nothing to do with Image Stabilising.

There are no down sides to buying a lens with IS over an identical lens without IS (other than cost, and perhaps long-term reliability) because you can always turn off IS if you don't need it.

For still photography, IS is almost always a benefit. There are few times you would need to turn it off (perhaps when you are panning to follow a moving object, or on a moving vehicle and are filming a subject on the same moving vehicle, or running low on battery power), but generally leaving it on is a benefit.

For video work, if you *want* to introduce any pan or tilt (either by hand or on a tripod), the IS system gets in the way. First, as you begin to pan, the IS system tries to counteract this, then you reach the limit of the IS system and the picture tends to jump back suddenly. So professional shooting with a tripod, when you want really smooth pans and tilts, IS is not suitable. However, for most of my non-professional hand-held shooting, I prefer to use IS - the weird beginning and ends of pan shots are a preferable compromise to camera shake.

Things to note when using IS: Battery life is reduced, and the 5D mic picks up the noise of the Image Stabilising system.

Hope this helps.
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Old February 19th, 2009, 09:40 PM   #15
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It definitely does, Thane. Thanks.
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