1/30 and lower at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Full Frame for HD

Canon EOS Full Frame for HD
All about using the Canon 1D X, 6D, 5D Mk. IV / Mk. III / Mk. II D-SLR for 4K and HD video recording.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old June 4th, 2009, 11:24 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vancouver, CANADA
Posts: 137
1/30 and lower

I dunno if its me but i CANT seem to get lower then 1/30 shutter in the "new" manual mode. The wheel only turns soo far.... Is there a way to set the camera lower then 1/30 shutter?

o
__________________
www.ozan.ca
Ozan Biron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 11:44 AM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 47
Ozan,

I am not an expert, but it seems to me that if the camera records at 30fps, then it would follow that it needs to shoot at 1/30 so that one frame can be coded 30 in one second. Any lower and you will be getting duplicates and partials, I guess.
Rick Casillas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 12:50 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
Rick is right. At 30 frames per second, the exposure of each frame cannot be longer than 1/30th of a second. The camera could simulate a longer exposure by adding in previous frames, but you can also do that in post.

One way to accomplish an interframe blur in most any NLE would be to duplicate your timeline, slide one of the timelines to the right by one frame, and then adjust the opacity of the top layer to taste. Various NLEs will likely have more specific motion blur effects and plugins; the above method is generic.
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 01:04 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vancouver, CANADA
Posts: 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Fairhurst View Post
Rick is right. At 30 frames per second, the exposure of each frame cannot be longer than 1/30th of a second. The camera could simulate a longer exposure by adding in previous frames, but you can also do that in post.

One way to accomplish an interframe blur in most any NLE would be to duplicate your timeline, slide one of the timelines to the right by one frame, and then adjust the opacity of the top layer to taste. Various NLEs will likely have more specific motion blur effects and plugins; the above method is generic.

hmmm, dats weird. I remember before the new firmware update.... i was able to hit lower then 1/30... The image would be super grainy but it totally helped in low light.
__________________
www.ozan.ca
Ozan Biron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 02:25 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: New York City
Posts: 613
Yes, in non-manual mode or in the old firmware, shutter would read very slow settings in very dark shooting situations, slower than 1/30th, but they were never actually used. When it said 1/15th sec shutter it was actually just using iso 6400 etc. thats why it looked extra noisy when the shutter number went down below 30. if it was actually using slower shutters than 1/30th, it would get blurrier and choppier, not noisier. now you can just set your iso super high if you want, if i recall they go pretty high above 3200 if you use manual mode and you have extended iso modes turned on.
Noah Yuan-Vogel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 03:08 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Fairhurst View Post
Rick is right. At 30 frames per second, the exposure of each frame cannot be longer than 1/30th of a second. The camera could simulate a longer exposure by adding in previous frames, but you can also do that in post.

One way to accomplish an interframe blur in most any NLE would be to duplicate your timeline, slide one of the timelines to the right by one frame, and then adjust the opacity of the top layer to taste. Various NLEs will likely have more specific motion blur effects and plugins; the above method is generic.
I believe it actually is possible to go to REAL shutter speeds (not simulated) below the framerate (not on the 5D) -- which is not possible in post. For example, if you shot at 1/15 with 30 fps, then the 1/15 frame would be repeated twice after the fact to fit into a 30 fps file. Kind of pointless at that point cause it'd be better to just put it into a 15 fps file, but I do believe there are cameras that do this very thing, it's obvious because the shutter drags really, really bad. People sometimes use it in doc work in extreme low light, no? Can't the DVX do this?
Bill Binder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 05:36 PM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
Bill, if the camera slows it's framerate to 15fps to get 1/15, then it's not really shooting slower than its framerate, is it? ;)
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2009, 07:15 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Voorheesville, NY
Posts: 433
No video camera truly shoots at a lower shutter than the inverse of its frame rate. Most video cameras have what's called "frame accumulation mode", where you can stipulate the number of frames to pile on top of each other. It's interesting that there aren't too many threads on dvinfo.net about this topic. Here's one:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/sony-xdca...lp-please.html

You see the standard kinds of slow shutter speed videos, the same way you see them for still cameras: nighttime shots of stationary objects, fireworks, smeary celestial bodies and blurred babbling brooks/waterfalls with stationary backgrounds (my favorite). But whats the advantage of such a video over a still shot?
Jay Bloomfield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2009, 10:11 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Bloomfield View Post
No video camera truly shoots at a lower shutter than the inverse of its frame rate. Most video cameras have what's called "frame accumulation mode", where you can stipulate the number of frames to pile on top of each other. It's interesting that there aren't too many threads on dvinfo.net about this topic. Here's one:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/sony-xdca...lp-please.html

You see the standard kinds of slow shutter speed videos, the same way you see them for still cameras: nighttime shots of stationary objects, fireworks, smeary celestial bodies and blurred babbling brooks/waterfalls with stationary backgrounds (my favorite). But whats the advantage of such a video over a still shot?
This is exactly what I was talking about. And yeah, Jon, agreed, your "effective" framerate is actually lower (e.g., in my example 15 fps), so yes, of course, your shutter can't be slower than your framerate, heh. Agreed! But, it can nonetheless place that effective framerate in a 30 fps video file. My main point is that some cameras can effectively shoot at much lower shutter speeds that 24 or 30 (actual slower shutter as opposed to simulating a slower shutter).
Bill Binder is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Full Frame for HD

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:09 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network