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Old May 26th, 2010, 04:16 PM   #1
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5D or 7D for film Short?

Can anyone tell me what they like and dislike about these cameras?

So far I am more impressed with the 5D's sample footage. I have not used either camera personally yet however. Looking to make a film short with one of these plus the Sony Ex1r.

Suggestions, comments, rebellions, rebuttals, wars, and chaos welcome!!!!
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Old May 26th, 2010, 04:39 PM   #2
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Silas: I have the 5D and now the T2i.

Likes: Beatiful images, shallow depth of field at about same as 35mm cinema film (case of T2i,) or shallower (case of 5D), relativeing light weight, fits in tight places, can be used low profile... most people think you are snapping photos. 5D expecially good in low light and best image of all three Canons. Adapt to a wide range of lenses, whether primes or zooms. Overall improvement in cinema look. All Canons now shoot in 24p.

Dislikes: Occasional jello from rolling shutter, have to account for aliasing an moire issues in setting up your shot. Issue siwth monitoring shot, while operator is shooting because LCD goes blank if monitor is connected. Image stabilization week. Sound input and monitoring not very practical. (Magic Lantern solves many issues with the 5D) Form factor not traditional, raising objections of some crew and actors professionals


As to 5D, setting up movie mode can be confusing, because it doesn't have a dedicated movie mode separate from stills by a switch. Wish 5D did 60p, for slow motion work.

Despite all that issues, these cameras can make great film. See this years finale of "House" which air May 17, for all the proof you need. That show was shot with the 3 5Ds solely right to the cards in camera, just like you and I wiould do.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 04:43 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply, Chris!

I wonder if it might be possible to check out your 5D sometime?

Would it be possible to make a time and you can show me how you shoot with it?

Perhaps a weekday.

I think I am going to get the 5D, but I am slightly hesitant because since it was not exactly built for video it may be difficult to use for the film I am going to be working on later in the year.

If I am able to use it for events and corporate as well that would be a big plus.
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Old May 27th, 2010, 11:34 AM   #4
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Chris' info is spot on, in my opinion.
I haven't come across the "jello" thing yet, since I'm almost always on sticks and haven't yet shot any fast moving action. Same with image stabilization. But the moire is a shot killer at times. I JUST learned to turn down the sharpness, so we'll see how much that affects this issue for me.
Beyond moire, my biggest complaints are the monitoring issue and the audio. Form factor I can live with.
Sure wish I had good 60p, too.

If we could have the monitoring, moire and audio solved (in camera) and 60P, I'd be in Little Matthew Heaven.
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Old May 28th, 2010, 12:44 PM   #5
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Here's an anti-moire trick for backgrounds with deep focus: Shoot a still for each setup. If the tile roofs in the background are dancing around in the video, you can mask and do motion tracking in After Effects to overlay the photo over the bad video.

This won't solve everything, and it won't fix aliasing on moving objects like clothing. It also can take a bit of work in post to apply. But if it saves a shot, it could be worthwhile.

Also, the stills could be used for posters, promotions, websites, scrapbooks, etc.
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Old May 31st, 2010, 12:14 AM   #6
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Thanks for the tip. Doubt I'd have thought of that. My camera is usually in motion on my 4ft jib or DIY dolly, but as you say, it won't save every shot, but it's a good tool to have in the belt.

Thanks!
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Old May 31st, 2010, 12:36 AM   #7
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I can't say I've put this into practice but it occurs to me that if you don't mind a bit of a blury background being able to calculate DOF and hyperfocal distance could also be useful in eliminating background moire.

Online Depth of Field Calculator

Last edited by Ben Denham; May 31st, 2010 at 02:06 AM.
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