Street shooting at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Full Frame for HD

Canon EOS Full Frame for HD
All about using the Canon 1D X, 6D, 5D Mk. IV / Mk. III / Mk. II D-SLR for 4K and HD video recording.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 13th, 2011, 01:21 AM   #1
Trustee
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chislehurst, London
Posts: 1,724
Street shooting

My background is as a stills photographer, I started shooting video seven years ago with a Canon mini DV, then XL1, XHa1 and now Sony EX3 & XF305. I have been working on a HDSLR DVD for the last couple of months and would like to share some thoughts.

As stated I started out as a stills photographer, I shot many journalist style candid pictures of people in the street. Now I am applying this technique using an HDSLR camera. Maybe The problem I have with shooting video is that I am forced to hold my camera on my subject for 10, 20, 30 or more seconds. For stills I could do a quick grab shot or two and move on to my next subject. I feel very concious about using a HDSLR for street video, almost like I am intruding, peeping Tom etc. I feel I am not being honest with my subject, at least with a video camera people know what you are doing. I filmed some children playing in a fountain, got some nice footage, but all the time I was waiting for an angry parent to confront me, I felt like I shouldn't be doing this.

Am I alone in my worries or does anyone have the same experience.
__________________
Eyes are a deaf manís ears. Ears are a blind manís eyes
Vincent Oliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2011, 05:29 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Salida, Colorado
Posts: 555
Re: Street shooting

If shooting a particular scene/event makes you uncomfortable, you shouldn't shoot it.

Whenever possible, I ask people if they mind if I shoot photo/video of them. In a park or other public setting, I would certainly seek out parental approval. I understand completely how a parent would feel about someone taking pictures of their child without having been asked, first. In fact, if I saw someone doing it, that person would be going to the hospital to get the camera removed from his...
Charles Newcomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2011, 12:51 AM   #3
Trustee
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chislehurst, London
Posts: 1,724
Re: Street shooting

In principal I totally agree with you. However, once you ask people if you can photograph or video them, then you have lost the "decisive moment" the shot can become posed and awkward.

I guess capturing people on film or digital media has moved on since Cartier Bresson's day.
__________________
Eyes are a deaf manís ears. Ears are a blind manís eyes
Vincent Oliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2011, 04:38 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sioux City, Iowa
Posts: 88
Re: Street shooting

Vinent and Charles,

I have shot for papers for over 25 years as a still shooter and then video until recently when I was laid off. I always shoot candids without asking first, then afterwards, when I feel I have the necessary images, I go to the subjects, identify myself, and ask for I.D.'s And everything is different with different circumstances. If you are shooting spot news, getting I.D.'s of people is not always possible, but if it is in pubic view, perfectly acceptable to use for the paper's print product or online. If it is a feature, that is different. I would shoot people watching high school football along with shooting game action, or people attending functions. If I interviewed or talked with those people, I would I.D. them in the footage. If not, no. If you look at Network TV usage of footage, cable or broadcast, you don't see credits listing the names of everyone who appeared in the footage during the broadcast appearing at the end of the 2 minute piece.

Vincent, if you feel creepy about what you are doing, maybe the approach for whatever topic you are covering should change. I always take exceptions to people who want to bust my chops because I am shooting or filming people in pubic. They are in public. If for instance I shot kids who are school crossing guards for say weather art on a cold day, snowy day bundled up so they looked like the Michelin tire guy and barely seeing out of their scarf, I would tell them I worked for the local paper and show them my press identification and tell them to tell their parents I had photographed them. If they have a lemonade stand on a street corner, I always ask whose house is closest so I can go chat with the parents and tell them I had photographed them.

If you are open and honest with people, you generally don't have problems. Most know you are working and just doing your job. I never run away from a scene or hurry, act suspicious, because I am not there working surreptiously, just documenting life in my community.

Jerry Mennenga
Iowa
Jerry Mennenga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2011, 01:35 AM   #5
Trustee
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chislehurst, London
Posts: 1,724
Re: Street shooting

Good reply Jerry, I take on board what you are saying. When I am out and about I shoot (used to shoot) many scenario's, to go up to every one and explain what I am doing would involve far too much time and many of the shots do not get used anyway. Here in the UK our news reports now pixelate children's faces or just show feet in the playground. Times have changed, the innocence of shooting in the street has been lost due to security matters, personal privacy and people with other motives for photographing children etc. Yet, here in the UK we are captured on almost every street, on the bus, train by CCTV cameras, the statistics are that we are captured up to 300 times on every visit to a high street. No one asked me if I mind.

You are right, it is time to change shooting techniques. I am now going to shoot flowers and trees - until I have to get a property release for filming someone's land. (not joking on this last remark as I have been asked for that too).

All the best
__________________
Eyes are a deaf manís ears. Ears are a blind manís eyes
Vincent Oliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2011, 06:04 AM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Boca Raton, FL
Posts: 2,979
Re: Street shooting

Interesting issues here. It strikes me that snapping a photo is like glancing and noticing someone ... nobody minds that. But shooting video is like staring ... which pretty much anybody would mind. I think it's good to be sensitive to that feeling.

A little OT but related: After filming in Haiti, Kenya and Zambia, I had to be honest. How would I feel if some tourists drove by my house and took pictures or video of me mowing my lawn, walking down the sidewalk, my family playing outside or whatever. Many people in these 3rd world countries have wised up to rich 1st worlders coming there and making money from their suffering with the photos and videos captured there. I can't blame them.

Press have a little easier time of it with a little more legitimacy but the rest of us, for anyone cares, are just videographers and photographers operating in a public place.
Les Wilson is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon EOS Full Frame for HD

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:01 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network