Lavalier x Wireless - XLR x 3.5 mm - What should I do for good audio with my GL2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon GL Series DV Camcorders

Canon GL Series DV Camcorders
Canon GL2, GL1 and PAL versions XM2, XM1.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:52 PM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 16
Lavalier x Wireless - XLR x 3.5 mm - What should I do for good audio with my GL2

I am know looking for a good audio solution for my educational videos using my GL2.

I am trying to record the videos directly into the hard drive of the computer using the Adobe Premiere capture function.

I have an Electrovoice RE 20 which is good for a voice over or working close to the microphone, but not when I am not so close. I have an Audio Technica Pro 88W wireless microphone which had a lot of noise when I used it with the 3.5 mm connection. I was thinking about getting a 3.5 to XLR adapter to connect the microphone to my GL2 through the M300 adapter. I have also seen a review at BH Photo Video where one reviewer recommended the Audio-Technica MT830mW Omni-Directional Condenser Lavalier Microphone for PRO-88 Transmitter. He suggests that with this microphone there is less background noise than the original lavalier microphone that comes with the AT Pro 88W I got.

I have also looked for a wired lavalier microphone with an XLR connection such as the Audio-Technica AT899 - Sub-Miniature Omni-Directional Lavalier Condenser Microphone with AT8537 Power Module which is not wireless. I am also watching on eBay a few Sony ECM 77B wire lavalier mic.

Suggestions regarding using Audio Technica Pro Wireless x a wire lavalier microphone with my Canon GL2 are welcome.
Daniel De Oliveira is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 4th, 2009, 07:42 AM   #2
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,294
In general, wired microphones will produce better results and lower noise than wireless. The exception being very low cost wired vs. very costly wireless mics.

Unless the noise is a result of electrical pickup by the wiring, using an XLR adapter is not likely to address the noise issue. However, some condenser mics (especially low cost mics) have high self noise levels, and a different mic may have less hiss and other self-noise. Detailed specifications for the mics you are considering may give a clue to this.

If the background noise of concern is room noise, using a directional mic may help.

I've not used the AT wireless mics so I have no specific comments on them. Maybe the audio forum here (All Things Audio) has some more info on the combination you are considering. However, based on its price point, and the lack of a published signal-to-noise specification, I would expect the model in question it to have noticeable background self-noise.
__________________
dpalomaki@dspalomaki.com
Don Palomaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 4th, 2009, 06:32 PM   #3
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 16
Thanks for the reply Don. I end up buying a Sony ECM 77B on eBay this weekend and I am going to see how it works. I am not sure if I need to buy a phanton power or other power to use it with my M300 on the GL2. I think your suggestion about using the All Things Audio Forum is probably better for this question. I did not find how to change or move this Thread to that forum.

The room background is actually low, especially at night. I believe most of the background noisy is due to the microphone itself (self noise level). That is why I was wondering if changing the microphone on the Audio Techica PRO-88 W transmiter to the Audio-Technica MT830mW Omni-Directional Condenser Lavalier Microphone would decrease the self noise as mentioned by the reviewer at BH Photo Video. I have to admit that due my limit knowledge in microphones and audio at this point I am not sure if the connection type XLR x 3.5 mm would make any difference. If the microphone has a crispy sound on a 3.5 mm connection it works for me.

I have started to understand some of the microphone dynamics. I know some are designed for close range, other for a more wide range use. I have purchased 2 Electrovoice RE 20 which are good microphones for close range. Not so good when I am 2 or 3 feet away from the microphone.

The Audio Technica Pro 88 W was purchased initially with the intent to use on live lectures connected to an audio source in the back of the auditorium or lecture room. Now that I am moving to make some educational videos on a home studio I am trying to used it for that matter. If it does not work I need to start researching a wireless microphone that will work. When I purchased the RE 20 it was mentioned in several places it is "Broadcast Standard". I wonder which wireless system is also Broadcast standard.

In a nutshell:
I got 2 electrovoice RE 20 (XLR connection) for voice over work on some videos. (happy with that)
I got 1 Sony ECM 77b (XLR connection) Lavalier mic for 1/2 body shots (in process of evaluating)
I have 1 Audio Techica Wireless Transmitter Pro 88W (3.5 mm connection) [too much self noise]

I will mix some of the audio done on different days on SoundTrack Pro and then bring them to either Adobe Premiere or Final Cut Pro.

Should I purchase the other microphone for my Audio Technica wireless or may be sell it on eBay and try to get a better wireless? Was the Sony ECM 77B a good choice?
Daniel De Oliveira is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 6th, 2009, 06:02 AM   #4
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,294
I believe the ECM77b includes a AA battery power option, not sure about the connectors. Cost is more than the Pro88 system, and like it is a better microphone than the Pro88 can do justice to. Same may apply to the MT830. If you already have microphones, give them a try. And you could use them wired as well if cable management is not a problem.

In some cases you can improve sound with some selective audio filtering in post, especially if the mic is mainly used for voice wth a fairly narrow bandwidth.

If you can, try before you buy a new wireless system. The better system start at around $700 or so. You may be able to find some bargains used, but some used may be in the recently lost 700 mHz band and that might render them not usable.
__________________
dpalomaki@dspalomaki.com
Don Palomaki is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon GL Series DV Camcorders

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:28 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network