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Canon GL2, GL1 and PAL versions XM2, XM1.


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Old December 22nd, 2005, 06:45 AM   #1
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Time code and "logging"

Hi,

Is there a way to set the GL2 so that the time code does not return to zero if you record, stop and record. For some reason, the time code does not continue. Sometimes it resets to zero and I am sure that it is something that I am doing that causes it. I was visiting with an editor yesterday and he was explaining how to "log" for editing purposes.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 07:23 AM   #2
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Try recording "nothing" for the length of the tape. It will write the timecode and when you record real material the timecode will already be there.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 12:00 PM   #3
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Micky? Have you set the time and date? Just checking with you. G
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 12:21 PM   #4
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Make sure to let the camera record for several extra seconds at the end of your shot. I you have to turn the camera off then back on, then just rewind a few seconds. That way, there should not be a timecode break. Anyway, no matter what you're filming, it's always better to let it run a few seconds more. Tape is cheap.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 03:57 PM   #5
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Yes, I have set the time and date. What I am wanting to do is create a written log that the editor can use when he gets the tape. For example:

292: Close up of boot stepping off ladder.
425: Wide shot of sunset.

If I understood the guy correctly, I use the numbers that indicate where on the tape this particular scene is located. This should expedite his editing work. Hope this makes sense to you.

Thanks,
Micky
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 04:19 PM   #6
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Yes, logging of takes is a "best practice" in video editing so having reliable time code numbers is essential. Starting and stopping the camera in record mode should not result in broken time code. If that's happening, you might want to have the camera serviced. However, you'll get a break in time code if you remove the tape from the camera between takes, or if you rewind and review your takes after you record them. Are you doing either of those things?
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 04:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim OMalley
Yes, logging of takes is a "best practice" in video editing so having reliable time code numbers is essential. Starting and stopping the camera in record mode should not result in broken time code. If that's happening, you might want to have the camera serviced. However, you'll get a break in time code if you remove the tape from the camera between takes, or if you rewind and review your takes after you record them. Are you doing either of those things?
Yes, we review the tapes after we record them. We are shooting video for a hunting DVD. We review the footage at the lodge after every hunt.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 04:36 PM   #8
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Do you review the takes in the field, on the camera, before you go back to the lodge? If so, that could be your problem. Going from "record" mode to "play" mode and back to "record" mode will cause you to have a time code break. (Note that I'm saying "takes" not "tapes.")
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 05:00 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim OMalley
Do you review the takes in the field, on the camera, before you go back to the lodge? If so, that could be your problem. Going from "record" mode to "play" mode and back to "record" mode will cause you to have a time code break. (Note that I'm saying "takes" not "tapes.")
Usually, that is not not the case. Maybe this is not going to be a problem on all of the tapes. We have 3-4 folks running cameras and I bought 50 tapes. I told them to always put in a fresh tape when they go back in the field. They were trying to "use up" the tape at first. But, one individual recorded over some good footage. After that, I think everyone has only used the tape for one session in the field. When they come back to the lodge, they do review the tape before removing it, locking it and storing it.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 05:07 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Micky McCrea
But, one individual recorded over some good footage.
Well, in at least that one case you definitely had a break in your time code. More than likely, that's the kind of thing that's been causing your time code problem (especially since you've had multiple shooters on this project.)
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 05:18 PM   #11
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"Stops" and then roll "forwards" create timecode breaks. Reviewing and then NOT stealing some frames of the previous capture will do it too. I just shoot. Stop. Shoot. Stop. Never ever had a timecode break using this method. Looking over my shoulder I got something in excess of 500 miniDV tapes.

Are you reviewing and then putting the same tapes back in the field?

Of course the other way - if already mentioned, apologies - is to bulk stripe all your tapes ALL of them! Then I guess you wont have breaks! But I aint doing it for you . . . ugh!

Grazie
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 06:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham Bernard
"Stops" and then roll "forwards" create timecode breaks. Reviewing and then NOT stealing some frames of the previous capture will do it too. I just shoot. Stop. Shoot. Stop. Never ever had a timecode break using this method. Looking over my shoulder I got something in excess of 500 miniDV tapes.

Are you reviewing and then putting the same tapes back in the field?

Of course the other way - if already mentioned, apologies - is to bulk stripe all your tapes ALL of them! Then I guess you wont have breaks! But I aint doing it for you . . . ugh!

Grazie
Once reviewed, the tapes are locked and stored. What does "bulk stripe" mean?
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 01:14 AM   #13
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Micky? I did a search for you on the subject.

Please note this from our own Chris Hurd on the subject:

"Considering that the camera's Rec Search + and - buttons will always insure that you have unbroken time code, I just can't see any reason to pre-stripe tapes for the XL2. In my opinion it's not worth the time required nor the wear on the tape transport mechanism and recording heads. The simple, quick employment of the Rec Search buttons means you'll never have a problem with broken time code on the XL2."

Here is the thread which contains Chris' post on - if you do a search on "stripe" or "striping tape" you will find others.

Here's the thread:
http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...ghlight=stripe

Grazie
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 01:20 AM   #14
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The other thing that we need to consider is that are you referring to TC breaks OR nonconsecutive OR out of sequence TC?

Striping tape - ugh - will lay down 0>60 mins BUT any "gaps" that are unfortunately created will have this underlying BLACK out of sequence TC. Do you understand?

Grazie
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Old December 23rd, 2005, 02:50 PM   #15
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Thanks for the replys. Based on what I understand from some of your comments, I think the problem must be that sometimes they tapes are rewound and played back in the field.

I will check that out.

Thanks again.
Micky
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