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Canon XH Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XH G1S / G1 (with SDI), Canon XH A1S / A1 (without SDI).


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Old September 21st, 2007, 05:23 AM   #1
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Cinema look ?

What is the cinema/film look that some people seem to prefer, I have a Canon HX A1 camera PAL can it record in cinema mode ? Do you only use this mode if you are recording a drama ?
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Old September 21st, 2007, 06:16 PM   #2
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Sophie, this is a question with an answer the size of "War and Peace". Essentially, 24f gives you the same frame rate as a movie camera shoots. It gives more of a film look than 60i or 30p, which tend to be more videoish, kinda like you would see on daytime soap operas or typical "home video"

Google "film look" and search for filmlook, film look, 24p, etc. on this site and you should find lots to read.
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Old September 21st, 2007, 07:09 PM   #3
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Another important and often forgotten thing about the "film look" is increased dynamic range, which is actually (IMO) NOT achieved by using Cinema Gamma modes. Instead, stretch your blacks, crush your whites (knee, low setting) -- all of which are settings you can alter in camera with the presets -- and IMO leave colors at normal levels. Then, in post, you can play with increasing contrast (which actually decreases dynamic range), controlling what gets crushed and what gets clipped, if that makes any sense.
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Old September 24th, 2007, 02:42 AM   #4
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pardon me for asking what do you mean by stretch black and crush whites? U mean increase the contrast?

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Originally Posted by Brandon Freeman View Post
Another important and often forgotten thing about the "film look" is increased dynamic range, which is actually (IMO) NOT achieved by using Cinema Gamma modes. Instead, stretch your blacks, crush your whites (knee, low setting) -- all of which are settings you can alter in camera with the presets -- and IMO leave colors at normal levels. Then, in post, you can play with increasing contrast (which actually decreases dynamic range), controlling what gets crushed and what gets clipped, if that makes any sense.
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Old September 24th, 2007, 03:51 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Kenny Shem View Post
pardon me for asking what do you mean by stretch black and crush whites? U mean increase the contrast?
If you go into customize, you can stretch blacks and crush whites by toggling BLACK (BLK) and KNEE (KNE) respectively.
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