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Canon XH Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XH G1S / G1 (with SDI), Canon XH A1S / A1 (without SDI).


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Old April 24th, 2008, 02:27 PM   #1
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Map a focus preset to a button on remote

I was wondering if it was possible to map a focus preset to a button on the remote? I shoot myself, by myself, a lot... and a lot of times I hold out in front of me (right up in front of the lens) small little objects I want the camera to focus on (almost macro). And sometimes the focus doesn't lock on because I think my hand and the object isn't lit as brightly as the background.

So does anyone know a way to map a focus preset to a button on the remote, so while I'm recording I can just hit the button and the camera will focus to the preset length? Thanks so much for any help.
Deke Ryland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2008, 02:59 PM   #2
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You should be able to do that with the focus shift button, I think. Set your in point and your out point and press the button and it will shift to the out point accurately each time.
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Old April 24th, 2008, 06:12 PM   #3
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I don't see a "focus shift" button on the remote? Just to be clear... I was talking about mapping the focus preset to the Remote.

Is there really a button on the remote for this? I'm guessing what you are talking about would still work even in auto-focus mode, right? Thanks Bill.
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Old April 24th, 2008, 08:35 PM   #4
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Oh, I missed the "remote" part. I doubt you can do it that way.
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Old April 25th, 2008, 02:02 AM   #5
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Hi Deke.........

Nope, you're out of luck with that one I'm afraid.

Just can't be done.

The AF isn't relying on the relative brightnesses BTW, just what it perceives as the "important" (ie. central 60% of view) part of the shot.

This is made way more complicated if you are zooming in, as the further you zoom in, the further from the lens is the minimum focus distance.

You may (boy, is this a big MAY!) be able to get around this if you either:

1. Leave the lens at Z0 for the entire shot. That gives you the best chance possible to have it focus in close if you can fill the view enough to persuade it YOU are the target.

2. If you need to have the lens set to other than Z0 for most of the shot, but at Z0 for the close up, try setting the Position Preset - Zoom for the two Z settings required (Far first, Z0 second) and, as you approach the camera, reach out with the other hand and press the On/ Set slider forward.

The problems with this are:

1. You'll need a tripod/ head combination resembeling a block of concrete to not show up the fiddling with the side of the camera.

2. You must by-pass the interlock button on the ON/ Set slider to enable it to move. Considering you won't even be able to see it from in front of the camera, I don't fancy you're chances.

Not exactly one of Canons best design features that interlock switch, but hey.

Sorry I can't be of more help.


CS
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Old April 25th, 2008, 02:50 PM   #6
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Hi again.........

A bit more explanation:

If you dive into the menu's and set "grid lines" to on, you'll see in the viewfinder/ lcd a central "box".

It's been my experience that unless your subject occupies more or less the entirety of that area (or a similar amount elsewhere in the field of view) then you cannot guarantee that the AF will latch to it.

With that in mind, there may well be a way to acheive what you want in a bit of a roundabout way.

First, take off the lens hood if the object is so small it needs to be REAL close, at that range the hood isn't doing anything anyway but shutting out light to the subject.

[The following is made a bit more scientific if you dive into the menu's and select the zoom display to show the Z figure and not the slider]

If you set up the camera and object such that at maximum wide zoom the object occupies the whole or most of the left or right side of the screen. Make sure that the AF will latch to it every time by switching to manual focus, racking it out of focus, then pressing the Push AF button.

Once that is working, zoom the lens in to Z30 or similar and make sure YOU are occupying most of the other half of the frame. Make sure the AF will always latch to you at the chosen zoom setting (the object will be practically invisible, if it's in the frame at all).

To get your shot, start off shooting YOU at Z30 etc, then press the Zoom Out button on the remote. The lens will pull back from you and at some point will zap into focus on the object.


Voila!

The first few times you set this up will be a complete pain in the proverbials, but once you've got it mastered it will be just like brushing your teeth.

I've taken some absolutely stunning macro shots using the same teqnique, so can vouch for the "proverbials" above.

Very effective tho'.

There is another way, tho' not so controlled. If you keep the object hard up against your body, it and you become the same target in effect. The AF will latch on to you as the main target getting the object in the process. The downside is the DOF will be minute and getting it just right if you're moving will be very tricky indeed.


CS
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