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Canon XH Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XH G1S / G1 (with SDI), Canon XH A1S / A1 (without SDI).


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Old January 31st, 2009, 10:31 PM   #1
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What UV filter is best to use with the A1?

What UV filter is best to use with the A1?
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Old January 31st, 2009, 10:36 PM   #2
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Don't put a $10 piece of glass on the front of a $1,500 lens. Get something like a good quality B+W. Don't settle for the entry level filters, get a quality piece of glass.
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Old January 31st, 2009, 10:46 PM   #3
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Thats what I was asking - which unit works well for everyone.
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Old February 1st, 2009, 12:49 AM   #4
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Agree with Curt, B+W. Not the slimline though, nothing for the lens cap to grab onto.

My best filter outdoors is the B+W graduated ND 502. It drops the upper half of the pix by 2 stops. Great for detail on the ground.

Last year someone asked whether I needed an ND on the cam with 2 already available, I said no at the time. But recently in the bright Oz summer sun, yes!

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Old February 1st, 2009, 04:59 AM   #5
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Canon makes UV filters, i've got one mounted.
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Old February 1st, 2009, 08:44 PM   #6
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How is this one:
65-070147 | B&H Photo Video
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Old February 1st, 2009, 09:14 PM   #7
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I use B&W on both my cams. Very good glass, well made too.
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Old February 1st, 2009, 10:25 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Santopolo View Post

That is their low end version. This one would be much better B+W | 72mm UV Haze 010 (MRC) Multi-Resistant Coating | 66070243
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 01:11 AM   #9
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If you can get just a protection filter at cheaper price it would work just as well.

Digital sensors are not sensetive to UV, thus UV filtering does absolutelly nothing to the image.

On the other hand filtering UV does not harm anything exept maybe your vallet.
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 09:33 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Petri Kaipiainen View Post
If you can get just a protection filter at cheaper price it would work just as well.

Digital sensors are not sensetive to UV, thus UV filtering does absolutelly nothing to the image.

On the other hand filtering UV does not harm anything exept maybe your vallet.
But the overall resolution is sensitive to shooting through a cheap piece of glass.
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 09:48 AM   #11
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The qustion is do i need the Multi-Resistant Coating model. I see the Canon filters do not have it. I am going to use them to really just protect the Lens, but I don't want any quality loss.
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 10:48 AM   #12
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If you feel you absolutely must fit a protective filter Tom (protection from what - are you shooting in sand-storms?) then buy the very best Super Multi-coated one you can find. This filter ends up as being your expensive zoom's new front element, and as such needs to be squeeky clean because it invariably reduces your hood's efficiency.

Remember this. If Canon thought that adding another element (to the line-up of 15 that were already there) would improve the image in any way, it would be there.

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Old February 2nd, 2009, 10:58 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick View Post
If you feel you absolutely must fit a protective filter Tom (protection from what - are you shooting in sand-storms?) then buy the very best Super Multi-coated one you can find. This filter ends up as being your expensive zoom's new front element, and as such needs to be squeeky clean because it invariably reduces your hood's efficiency.

Remember this. If Canon thought that adding another element (to the line-up of 15 that were already there) would improve the image in any way, it would be there.

tom.
I Agree 100%

Tom

I must make a disclaimer here. My expertise is in the still photography world and not in the Video World, I am new to video.

If you are not using a coated filter, it would be like you shooting through a window. I'm guessing that you are like me and don't like to shoot through a window if at all possible.

Many professionals, including myself don't use a "Protection Filters" on any of our still lens as they can affect the overall resolution and we are looking for the best resolution obtainable.

So how much can a protection filter affect you image quality, the lower the quality of filter the greater negative effect. So if you do plan on using one, don't cheap out.

How Lens Coating Works
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 11:09 AM   #14
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Curt - you're from the still camera world and you're used to dealing with huge chips and long focal lengths. Even 28 mm seems vast to us video guys.

The XH has tiny 1"/3 chips and focal lengths in the 4 mm region. 4 mm! The dof is all-encompassing, and the chips can easily see the tiniest speck of dust on your 'protective filter' when shooting into the light.

Multi-coating is tough these days; you'd intentionally have to set out to damage it to succeed. So - use filters when you absolutely must (grads or polarisors) but other than that think twice before you fit one. They degrade video footage far more than stills.

tom.
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 11:33 AM   #15
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Tom H

Thanks for the heads up, I though that might be the case but it is nice to have my assumptions backed up.
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