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Canon XH Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XH G1S / G1 (with SDI), Canon XH A1S / A1 (without SDI).


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Old May 26th, 2009, 01:25 PM   #1
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Taping in the rain..

Hey gang. I was wondering if anyone can recommend a good rain cover to protect the camera against the rain. Obviously I won't be submerging the camera but I was wondering how I can safely use it during a down pour. I was looking at the Kata Rain covers but I am not sure as they seem like they don't cover the viewfinder.
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Old May 26th, 2009, 01:39 PM   #2
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Well I know the Porta Brace covers the view finder.

JS
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Old May 26th, 2009, 01:44 PM   #3
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Do they make one that is waterproof/resistant?
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Old May 26th, 2009, 09:17 PM   #4
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I would suggest the Porta Brace Rain Slicker (or Porta Brace Body Armor which also has a pull out rain guard), but I would also use a very large umbrella or tarp. The reason being that either Porta Brace product will help to save the camera if caught in a unexpected shower but I wouldn't trust them on their own in a continuous rain or heavy down pour. Reason being there are just too many folds and seams where water will pool and or seep through.

I have the Body Armor and have used my XhA1 in a pretty solid snowstorm with the rain guard covering the camera, I've also shot in a very light rain. In both cases it was fine as the snow simply blows off (instead of melting on the camera surface) and a light rain while a little concerning is pretty much only going to get on the front lense element (which I had covered with a UV filter).

The rain guard for the body armour has a clear side to view the LCD pulled out and you can still manage to get to the lense zoom,focus,aperature controls easily.

All the best,
James Hooey
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Old May 27th, 2009, 05:18 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by James Hooey View Post
I would suggest the Porta Brace Rain Slicker (or Porta Brace Body Armor which also has a pull out rain guard), but I would also use a very large umbrella or tarp. The reason being that either Porta Brace product will help to save the camera if caught in a unexpected shower but I wouldn't trust them on their own in a continuous rain or heavy down pour. Reason being there are just too many folds and seams where water will pool and or seep through.

I have the Body Armor and have used my XhA1 in a pretty solid snowstorm with the rain guard covering the camera, I've also shot in a very light rain. In both cases it was fine as the snow simply blows off (instead of melting on the camera surface) and a light rain while a little concerning is pretty much only going to get on the front lense element (which I had covered with a UV filter).

The rain guard for the body armour has a clear side to view the LCD pulled out and you can still manage to get to the lense zoom,focus,aperature controls easily.

All the best,
James Hooey
Thank you James. I will check it out!
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Old May 27th, 2009, 08:40 AM   #6
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or for those with a smaller budget

In the show: Making of Deadliest Catch
Really large Glad zip lock bags were used with a slit cut for lcd viewer then taped and a hole cut for the lens then taped, hands went in from the bottom. Under $5.00 for 5 at my supermarket. Good for bringing back dirty clothes.
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Old May 28th, 2009, 12:17 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Roy Feldman View Post
In the show: Making of Deadliest Catch
Really large Glad zip lock bags were used with a slit cut for lcd viewer then taped and a hole cut for the lens then taped, hands went in from the bottom. Under $5.00 for 5 at my supermarket. Good for bringing back dirty clothes.
So I wrapped up the camera in some bags and gave it a shot but I couldn't bring up the courage not to cover the lens so the picture seems out of focus. Also it was hard to control the exposure. Is it really safe to leave the lens exposed as long as you have a uv filter on?

YouTube - Rain
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Old May 29th, 2009, 08:16 PM   #8
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You can't shoot through a plastic bag and expect the footage to be in focus. You need to just leave the end of the lens sticking out, only far enough so you can tape the bag around it.

I normally use small trash bags, the black kind. I put it over the camera, while on a tripod. Then carefully cut a slit for the lens, and if I cut the slit a little small, it stretches over the lens and I don't even need to use tape. I do the same thing for the viewfinder. So the only thing uncovered are the end of the lens, with a filter on, and the end of the viewfinder. I stick my hands up under the bag for control. The bag is big enough to protect the tripod too. I can focus and set aperture with my left hand, zoom with the lanc controller on my tripod handle with my right hand. The only thing that gets wet is me. Which is why an assistant and one of those big golfing umbrellas are nice. They're big enough for two people and the camera, but you wouldn't want the camera unprotected because the wind can blow rain onto it.

I have a rain cover that came with my Petrol case, but I've never used it. I had a rain cover that camer with my Sony Betacam Sp camera many years ago and never used it either. The plastic bags work better and are quicker to set up, in my opinion.
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Old May 29th, 2009, 08:54 PM   #9
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Thanks Bill. I guess the risk to the camera is minimal with the uv filter being the only exposed part.
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Old May 29th, 2009, 09:19 PM   #10
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If you have a lens hood, just make sure the plastic bag is duct/gaffer taped to the lens hood (I use black plastic trash bags on my XL1s)... and make sure you don't tip the lens toward the sky... the hood will act as a little umbrella for the lens (an umbrella would work as well, have a PA hold it ;) )
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