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Canon XH Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XH G1S / G1 (with SDI), Canon XH A1S / A1 (without SDI).


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Old August 24th, 2010, 12:47 PM   #1
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smaller HD camcorder for travel

I have an XH-A1. I'm looking for a smaller camcorder I can take traveling (e.g., hiking). I want one that is easiest to match the video with the XH-A1, in instances where I use both. I also want one that either has decent audio, or the ability toi use an external mic.

Suggestions?
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Old August 25th, 2010, 04:43 PM   #2
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I would go a 7D or a 550D great image and you have a SLR as well
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Old August 25th, 2010, 08:10 PM   #3
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For my European vacation last year I took my Canon HV-20, a Sennheiser 100 series G3 xmit/rcvr/lav and Litepanels Micro light. If I go again, I will probably trade out the wireless lav kit for a small Rode Videomic shotgun.
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Old August 25th, 2010, 08:15 PM   #4
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Trouble with the 550D is it's big and bulky for hiking, especially if you want telephoto for close ups of the wildlife. Traditionally the HV series are the A1 backup - but AVCHD despite its other problems really is made for travel. I went for the HFS10 and the DM100 mic, full manual control, handy 1.7X tele option, excellent stills.
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Old August 25th, 2010, 09:32 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer Listing View Post
Trouble with the 550D is it's big and bulky for hiking, especially if you want telephoto for close ups of the wildlife. Traditionally the HV series are the A1 backup - but AVCHD despite its other problems really is made for travel. I went for the HFS10 and the DM100 mic, full manual control, handy 1.7X tele option, excellent stills.
Other than stills, what is the advantage of the HFS10 vs the HV40?
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Old August 26th, 2010, 12:42 AM   #6
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Hi Stephen,
Card. No need to carry or change tapes. Once you travel with a card camera, you can never go back. Also, don't underestimate the pre-record. Wild creatures have a way of waiting until you stop recording before they pop out of their holes for a brief look around, or before they jump out of the water. With pre-record, just press the record after they have appeared and disappeared, and there they are. The lack of viewfinder is the main bummer, later models have the VF, but no pre-record.
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Old August 26th, 2010, 05:41 PM   #7
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I've dragged a HV20 around the world for 5yrs now, great camera. The only accessories are a Shure A58WS-BK - Black Windscreen for Ball Mics A58WS-BLK - B&H fitted over the mic and held down by a womens elastic pony tail holder. Looks ugh but it stops ALL wind .. I've done narration at the camera in a blizzard. Also an ND filter for all outdoor work and a UV for indoor.

I work out how much tape I'll need to take, then double it .. finding legit Pana tapes is very difficult in the 3rd world and just wastes time.

Cheers.
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Old August 26th, 2010, 06:05 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Black View Post
I've dragged a HV20 around the world for 5yrs now, great camera. The only accessories are a Shure A58WS-BK - Black Windscreen for Ball Mics A58WS-BLK - B&H fitted over the mic and held down by a womens elastic pony tail holder. Looks ugh but it stops ALL wind .. I've done narration at the camera in a blizzard. Also an ND filter for all outdoor work and a UV for indoor.

I work out how much tape I'll need to take, then double it .. finding legit Pana tapes is very difficult in the 3rd world and just wastes time.

Cheers.
What brand ND filter do you use?

Do you use a wide angle or telephoto lens?

Last edited by Stephen Sobel; August 26th, 2010 at 06:12 PM. Reason: added a question.
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Old August 26th, 2010, 06:27 PM   #9
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Steve, I prefer B+W multicoated filters, usually get 'em from BnH in NY. I also have a Canon WDH43 wide but rarely use it now. No tele, no time to fit 'em and they make the rig to big and heavy. I work very fast I'm more interested in the next sequence and detail for the narration. Oh I take a Sony UWP wireless rig for narration in loud environments like city traffic.

Because of the outrageous freight charges down here, I used to fill a BnH cart up but keep it under a grand otherwise there's 10% import tax charges.
Cheers.
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Old August 29th, 2010, 07:20 PM   #10
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Do you ever use a polarizier filter?
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Old August 29th, 2010, 09:07 PM   #11
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I did when I started out, like a lot of folk I got this one THK Photo Products, Inc. experimented with it then moved to shooting other things.

So I agree with Moose, polarizers are a still camera accessory to enhance scenic landscapes and nature shots and bring up the contrast. The viewer takes his time to evaluate and appreciate the picture and not be governed by the rate of the speed of the edited video.

But for video work they are good for cancelling reflections in glass windows and water and some nature/landscape work where you've got time to set the shot up. However soon as you pan the camera you lose the polarized effect.

When you start out, I'd combine getting various polarized type effects while learning basic colour correction in your NLE, then buy a polarizor if you want one.

For me a more usable filter for outdoor video work is this 'graduated ND'
B+W 72mm Graduated Neutral Density Gray 502 Filter 65063819 - It drops the sky 2 stops so you get more detail on darker subjects on the ground.

Mmmm looks like they've discontinued the 43mm version? I use the B+W 502 on the A1 and I never screw 2 filters on together. Hope this helps.

Cheers.
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Old August 29th, 2010, 11:07 PM   #12
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Based on a few experienced dslr guy's recommendations, I got one of the Singh Ray variable nd filters with some step down rings. I've always relied on the video camera's nd settings to take care of extreme light and on the dslrs, you can't simply shutter control the light in video mode. So to get dof or to limit light on any shot, the nd filters are the only way to go. The singh ray while freekin expensive, is a great deal when you consider how many filters you'd have to stack to equal it. I got the thin version which allows minimal vignetting on the wide lenses. I can tell you in AZ where the sun is intense all year round, this is the way to go on the dslrs. My hmc150's nd filters have done a great job.
Also of note, all my lenses get a UV protector filter the minute they are unboxed. It does help with the nasty haze we get here plus insures my lenses stay perfect.
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Old August 30th, 2010, 08:55 AM   #13
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I would go with HF S11, picture quality it is the same camcorder as HF S10, but better IS;
2010 HF S series are great, and I loved the 3,5" LCD, but the iPhone-like sliding menu is terrible;
HF S series is a very capable camcorder and even low light between two will intercut very well
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Old August 31st, 2010, 08:46 AM   #14
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Or the new Canon XF100, just announced today:

http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/dv-info-...105-xf100.html
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Old August 31st, 2010, 08:29 PM   #15
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This is certainly an interesting development!
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