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Canon XH Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XH G1S / G1 (with SDI), Canon XH A1S / A1 (without SDI).


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Old March 31st, 2007, 11:28 PM   #1
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Shooting Music Video ADVICE!

Hey guys, so I got my first (unpaid) gig. It's shooting a music video that is supposed to be shot at night and outdoors with a big spotlight(s) on the band. Was wondering if you guys had any tips, especially what mode to shoot in, 24f or 60i, also maybe if the light is too low and I have to switch down to 1/24 shutter do yall think that might cause too much blurring if they're moving around etc? Any advice greatly appreciated. I'm thinking about renting a steadicam (or equivalent) as I want this to look good so I can put it in my reel (which is non-existent at the moment), do you guys think this would be a good idea, i think they go for about 25-30 bucks a day around here.
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Old April 1st, 2007, 01:21 AM   #2
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Exposure will be an issue with the kind of contrast ratios you're dealing with. 24p will give the shoot a look quite different than 60i. I haven't shot anything interlaced since I bought my A1. 30f and a little 24f so far.

There will be some motion blur at 24f, esp. if you go down to 1/24 shutter. I'd suggest you have a good monitor on-site and run some test footage prior to shooting. You can also play with presets that way, and check exposure.

A cam stabilizer is almost a necessity for 24p. And I wouldn't overdo the spotlight, since the cam can pull a decent image with probably less light than you'd think at 0db gain wide open iris. And the brighter the key light, the less you'll "see" into the shadows.

Keep us posted,
Brian Brown
BrownCow Productions
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Old April 1st, 2007, 10:48 AM   #3
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Hey Cal,
Music videos allow you the ability to break the rules and get creative.
Mainly you should find out what the band is looking for in terms of style, composition, color...etc. Have them look at a bunch of different music videos on the web and TV and find out what they like and don't like.

Maybe they would like high contrast with black, black shadows....Or maybe they would hate it, it's something you should find out before hand.

Like Brian said, get yourself a good monitor and do some tests before you shoot.
Personally I would shoot in 24F with a 1/48 shutter speed (unless you are going for a certain effect), but find out what you like and more importantly the band likes.

If you can get some extra lights that would help, even if they are just work lights. (You can always take away/control the light as needed).

I think a stedicam would be great, but if it's your first time don't underestimate the power of the tripod and nicely composed shots.

Best of luck to you.
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Old April 1st, 2007, 12:30 PM   #4
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Thanks for the advice so far!! how do you guys go about making sure its easy to sync the audio up with all the clips in your NLE's timeline (im using fcp)? I'm mean like i assume its just going to be these guys singing to their cd playing out some speakers right, so do I need to make sure the music (during the shoot) starts or play button (on cd player) is pressed with some kind of audio cue or something (like a clapper) to make it easy to sync all the clips in fcp? LoL i haven't even met w/ these people yet and I'm already in over my head... at least their not paying me or I would be really nervous : )
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Old April 1st, 2007, 03:42 PM   #5
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If you run the recorded song as a "scratch track", recorded to one of the channels of the camera, they'll be nothing really to synch in post. The other channel could catch any nuances of the (re)performance that you might want to mix in (if any).

On any b-roll stuff, the only thing that might be tricky is anytime you see the drum sticks come down to keep them on beat. Guitar chords or strumming is fairly forgivable. Some other b-roll stuff to capture is the band getting ready. Sometimes the "tech" side of it... camera in the frame, mixing, slates, getting direction, etc., is cool to see, and makes the editing easier not to have to stay "on synch" all the time.

Just some thoughts,
Brian Brown
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