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Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders
Canon XL2 / XL1S / XL1 and GL2 / XM2 / GL1 / XM1.


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Old November 11th, 2004, 12:05 PM   #1
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Filming in Snow

Hey all.

I am going away in January and taking my XL2 along. I was hoping you help be able to give me some advice. Basically while I'm in Japan for three weeks I want to try and make some very short films and use the cam for its first proper test run. I might be able to visit some snowy areas and if so what is the best way to film in these conditions? I take it my cam will need a little body warmer or something? If so are these costly and where would be the best place to try? I am on a very very tight budget, so I'm not if I will be able to spend big bucks on something to protect the cam, if not then I will unlikely film anything in the snow.

Thanks peeps

Kev
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Old November 11th, 2004, 12:45 PM   #2
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Kevin, it would depend on how long you were planing on being outside. I have videoed in the Colorado ski areas with no problem. I recommend a pair of "duck hunter" mittens. These are great as you can pull the flap off of your fingers, and thum, so you can operate the camcorder without having to take the mitten off. Also, between shots I take the battery off and put it in my pocket. Use a polerizing filter or an additional ND filter. Check the exposure meter with a white card instead of the snow as snow tends to look a little gray after a bit. Have fun. Bob
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Old November 11th, 2004, 12:55 PM   #3
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Thanks bob :)
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Old November 11th, 2004, 01:08 PM   #4
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I found a set of Opteka filters for 35 which has a UV filter, polarizing filter and flourescent filter. Are these as good as the official canon FS-72U filters that appear to be twice as much?
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Old November 11th, 2004, 01:30 PM   #5
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Hey Kevin!

The Kata CRC-11 should cover your standard config XL2. Petrol PRC1 too. Any good sporting goods/outdoor gear shop should have hand/foot warmer packs that you can put near your camera. I don't recommend taping them right to the camera, but having a layer or two of cloth between. I should think a rain cover that has more cloth with plastic windows would be better. Plastic might not be so great. Apply a waterproof spray if need be.

Also have a large garbage bag to wrap the whole rig in. The moment you step inside anywhere, the moisture will condense on and inside the cold camera, which is bad thing :~) . Be sure it's sealed up tight, with no holes.

The key to enjoying winter is being dressed for it. Layers, layers, layers! Be sure you have silk or polypropelene long underwear. The same for glove liners and socks. I am always on the lookout for thin, yet warm gloves to wear under my hunter's mittens.

Not sure about Opteka. I would get B+W, Tiffen, Formatt, Canon, or Nikon for that matter. It's a 72mm thread size. You might be able to find some good clean used filters at the local camera shop. A decent Haze 1 or Haze 2 would be good for the altitude and blue light of the mountains and winter lighting. Plus it'll keep the front lens element from getting damaged. You shouldn't need the fluoro filter, you can manual white balance.
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Old November 11th, 2004, 01:39 PM   #6
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that's great, thank you
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Old November 11th, 2004, 02:03 PM   #7
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Jeez, so many different types of polarizing filters. I'm not sure what to get. There's linear, circular, warm linear , warm circular, special effects and so on :/
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Old November 11th, 2004, 03:30 PM   #8
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you should hookup with ken or somebody from japan. there are some members here in japan.
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Old November 11th, 2004, 03:35 PM   #9
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If anything get the circular polarizer. I prefer a polarizer with no effects. If I want warmth, I'll either add it in post, because it's the whole show, or I'll drop something additional in front of the lens for a particular scene.

The B+W, Canon, or Tiffen Circular Polarizers should be good. Circular is better because some viewing systems and beam splitters already polarize the light and a linear polarizer would cause the polarization to be absorbed by those optics, relative to it's rotation. For film cameras, linear polas interfere with the AF and metering systems. So circular is the way to go.

If you do landscapes Singh Ray have some pretty nice effects polarizers. The Blue/Gold Polarizer is supposed to be nice. I haven't used one, but the photos on th website look nice.
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Old November 11th, 2004, 03:43 PM   #10
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Excellent, thanks.

Is it worth getting one that is coated on both sides?

http://shopping.kelkoo.co.uk/sitesearch/go.jsp?offerId=4405523120501uk4405523-Hoya-72mm+Circular+Polarizer+Glass+Filter&JServSessionIduk=n0rc11nfp2.WOL1uk&orw

That one is a good price for me. The others are pretty expensive. It is either that or the Canon Circular polarizer glass filter for 79 :O
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Old November 11th, 2004, 04:36 PM   #11
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Go for Canon! I have always felt that the Hoya is inferior. This was a while ago, they may be better now, but you get what you pay for. Get the Canon and you won't have to worry.

I didn't know they were multicoated. If you can try it out at the store, see which one flares the least.
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