recornding sunset with interval timer at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders

Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders
Canon XL2 / XL1S / XL1 and GL2 / XM2 / GL1 / XM1.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 13th, 2005, 12:02 PM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: kingston, canada
Posts: 11
recornding sunset with interval timer

Hi, I will be recording a sunset and sunrise using the interval timer, which I have never used before. I plan to speed the shot up so it's about 30 seconds max. Has anybody ever filmed a sunrise/sunset before, and if so, what is a good combination of settings for INTERVAL TIME and INTERVAL RECORD TIME. I have to hike to the top of a mountain so I'd like to get it right the first time! Thanks, Nico
Nico Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2005, 12:29 PM   #2
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Mays Landing, NJ
Posts: 11,542
I'm not familiar with that function on the XL2, however on the Sony cameras it is a poor choice for sunsets. If you're filming something that will fit on one tape (60 minutes) then you're much, much better off just shooting normally and speeding up in post.

The interval timers are generally pretty coarse and better suited for filming events that last 12 hours or more. On the Sony's the shortest interval is a 1/2 second burst every 30 seconds IIRC. That will yield very jerky results. I've filmed a number of sunsets in realtime and sped up in post with very good results.

Of course this might be different if the XL2 has a greater range of interval adjustment...
Boyd Ostroff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2005, 12:40 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 167
I agree with Boyd. I've also shot numerous sunrises and sunsets, and realtime is fine. With interval recording, I believe the tape transport ends up in "pause" mode during those 30-second intervals, so I've never used it on my GL2.

If you need a little more time, LP mode can be used. The increased chance for a dropout is minimal considering that you'll be throwing away 80% or more of the frames in post anyway. A sunrise fits rather nicely into 90 minutes.

As an aside, I'd recommend that you set your manual focus (made that mistake a couple times -- fuzzy clouds mess up the auto circuit). You may also want to use the auto exposure setting since the light level will be changing so much.

Have fun!
__________________
There's no way for you to know if what I'm saying is true unless you know what the truth is, and there's no way for you to know what the truth is unless there is a truth that you can know. -- Frank Peretti
Jeremy Davidson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2005, 12:42 PM   #4
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 1,689
I agree, the best bet is to get an 80 minute tape and let it roll out, switch it and let it roll out...etc. I have been shooting a lot of time lapse for the beginning of this sports show I am doing and it can look pretty good, just takes practice.

If you need to use the interval, recording 2 seconds every 30 seconds will give you the most information.


ash =o)
Ash Greyson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2005, 01:34 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 187
Use Scenalyzer

Scenalyzer yields excellant results for timelapse. If you can hook up your laptop to the xl2 via firewire whilst shooting all the better, but if not, record the sunset as normal to DV tape (1 hour max obviously) then use scenalyzer to capture timelapse frames from the tape.

What it will do is capture a percentage of the frames captured so you get a smooth result, of which you have full control. If you connect the XL2 to the laptop and scenalyzer at the same time, you can leave it running all day and compress it down to what ever length you want (if you have everlasting batteries, or mains power that is !!)

http://www.scenalyzer.com
Declan Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 12:39 AM   #6
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: kingston, canada
Posts: 11
Okay, thank for all the info everyone. It sounds like realtime sped up in post is the way to go. As I don't have the budget or time to learn new software due to a tight schedule, does Final Cut Pro produce decent results in post? Is simply a matter of increasing the speed setting? Or do you take freeze frames of the clip? Also, what would be the best mode to shoot in? The rest of the documentary footage will be in 24P non advanced. Thanks again...
Nico Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 02:20 AM   #7
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 1,689
60i... more information to speed up...


ash =o)
Ash Greyson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 04:12 AM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Syke, Germany
Posts: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Davidson
You may also want to use the auto exposure setting since the light level will be changing so much.
Hmm. Personally I would fix the exposure setting to make sure that the picture gets darker as the sun sets. After all, that's what actually happens when the sun goes down.
__________________
Keep rolling

Rainer
Rainer Hoffmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 06:46 AM   #9
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainer Hoffmann
Hmm. Personally I would fix the exposure setting to make sure that the picture gets darker as the sun sets. After all, that's what actually happens when the sun goes down.
Rainer is absolutely correct. DO NOT adjust for the change in light levels. To have the sun go down and the light level remain the same will look like something out of the Old Testament!

Jay
Jay Gladwell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 07:26 AM   #10
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: DFW area, TX
Posts: 6,108
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico Ray
Okay, thank for all the info everyone. It sounds like realtime sped up in post is the way to go. As I don't have the budget or time to learn new software due to a tight schedule, does Final Cut Pro produce decent results in post? Is simply a matter of increasing the speed setting? Or do you take freeze frames of the clip? Also, what would be the best mode to shoot in? The rest of the documentary footage will be in 24P non advanced. Thanks again...
Since you are using the XL-2, you can also use Canon's own DVPC recorder software. The learning curve is 0. Plug in the camera, make sure you go into the camera menu and set DV Control to on. Start the software and hit the record button. That's all you have to do. The viewfinder will even tell you how many hours of record time you have on your hard drive. It only runs on Windows though, which is why I have a Windows laptop.

-gb-
Greg Boston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 09:16 AM   #11
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Mays Landing, NJ
Posts: 11,542
Sounds like Nico is on the Mac since he asked about FCP.

To answer your question, yes FCP can do this just fine. Capture the full tape and drop the clip into a sequence. Select it on the timeline and go to Modify > Speed and choose either a new duration or a percentage of the existing speed (1000% would be a 10x speed increase, for example).

There's a checkbox for frame blending. Try a little section with and without this option. You may find that it actually degrades the image a little if enabled. It will also take rendering time if you enable frame blending.

After you get it the way to like you may want to export the sequence as a new file so you can delete the hour of realtime video that you captured.
Boyd Ostroff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 09:37 AM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 167
Rainer and Jay have a good point about the manual exposure setting. I opted to use auto to extend the amount of time that the camera would have an acceptable light level, meaning I thought a sunrise would go from black to overexposed much too quickly, so I wanted the camera to follow it. I've done this several times, and the results ranged from so-so to incredible.

That said, manual mode makes sense, and I have used manual for mid-day shots of passing clouds (again I recommend manual focus!). I'll have to try that for the next sunset I do and see how it works.
__________________
There's no way for you to know if what I'm saying is true unless you know what the truth is, and there's no way for you to know what the truth is unless there is a truth that you can know. -- Frank Peretti
Jeremy Davidson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 09:52 AM   #13
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Mays Landing, NJ
Posts: 11,542
I've shot a number of sunsets and agree about manual exposure. A lot of the drama comes from the fade to black.
Boyd Ostroff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 02:55 PM   #14
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: kingston, canada
Posts: 11
Okay, thanks again for all the helpful advice. So as it stands now it seems as the best way is to shoot real time, using Manual Focus, manual Exposure, 60i, and then speed this up in post. The rest of the documentary is shot in 24P non advanced, so will the 60i footage match? My intuition would be to shoot 24P for consistency, or would this produce poor results for the sunset sequence? As well, unfortunately I'm only working with one battery pack, and according to the manual that should give me about 90 minutes of record time if I'm lucky. So will one 80 minute tape be sufficient to capture the sunset? Cheers, nico
Nico Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2005, 04:10 PM   #15
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico Ray
So will one 80 minute tape be sufficient to capture the sunset? Cheers, nico
Certainly! Just check the almanac to see when the sun sets on the you're shooting and plan accordingly... how much of "before," "during," and "after" you want.

For example, you want the sun to set in the middle of the 80-minute tape recording (at 45 minutes) and the sun sets at 7 o'clock, you start recording at 6:15.

Jay
Jay Gladwell is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:10 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network