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Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders
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Old May 1st, 2006, 01:17 PM   #1
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Protective lens filter question?

I feel using a protective lens filter could be a smart idea but I am not sure if it will affect the image quality. I guess my question is if I use one is there one brand better than the other? I am also wondering what are some of the opinions floating around out there are?
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Old May 1st, 2006, 01:34 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Di Lalla
I feel using a protective lens filter could be a smart idea but I am not sure if it will affect the image quality. I guess my question is if I use one is there one brand better than the other? I am also wondering what are some of the opinions floating around out there are?

Scott,

Most use a UV filter and I don't believe they affect the image at all. Always a good idea to use a quality one, but they are pretty inexpensive. Keeps you from getting those nasty fingerprints on the lens too.

Mike
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Old May 1st, 2006, 02:25 PM   #3
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I got a Hoya UV filter and I can't see a difference in quality, which is good. But I do find myself picking up lens flares more than without it.
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Old May 1st, 2006, 02:59 PM   #4
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I personally don't like them and prefer not to use them. I also recommend the same to others unless you're shooting in conditions where the risk of something happening to a lens is higher than usual.
Even the best filters will cause more flare and ghosting in some circumstances because lenses aren't designed with filters in mind.
The XL2 has a great lens hood which should protect the lens from most things making a UV filter more of an annoyance than something useful.
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Old May 1st, 2006, 04:11 PM   #5
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Well not to start a war, but I couldn't disagree with Andrew more. I think you should always use a UV protective lens filter. First off, if something hits the front of the camera, the filter may save the actual lens from any damage. That's reason enough right there. But also, if you put a quality UV lens filter on as soon as you get your camera, you'll only need to clean the filter and not the glass of the actual lens. Remember, your lens is worth a lot of money, and if you scratch it, either through an accident or improper cleaning, its toast.
I use a higher qualtiy B+W UV 010 Haze filter. It has no affect on the image quality whatsoever, and I haven't encountered any "flare and ghosting" issues. I think telling someone not to use a UV protective filter is actually bad advice, I never met a videographer who didn't use one. The lens hood is designed to prevent lens flare, it won't protect your lens from dust or other airborne particulate matter that might potentially damage your lens. Its an odd statement to say "I don't like them", for if you're using a quality UV filter, you shouldn't see any difference in the image quality at all.
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Old May 1st, 2006, 05:00 PM   #6
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I don't mind people disagreeing with me, so don't worry about it, it's all good friendly discussion:)
I don't recommend people never use one, but I recommend they be used if there is a high risk of something hitting the lens which in most cases isn't really present.
For example, I personally wouldn't bother using one during a wedding for 2 reasons, first of which there isn't much risk (at most weddings anyway) and second, candles and other lights can cause ghosting. I've never tried that filter, so the fact that you've used it and like it is great and I think I'll pick that one up and try it out.
If I were shooting in dusty conditions where things were blowing around and there's a chance something can hit the lens or it will get really dirty, then in those cases I definitly use a filter.
In terms of the lens hood, it's primary purpose is to reduce flare, but while it's there, it definitly protects the lens from bumps and people's hands since it makes it more difficult to reach the front of the actual lens.
I think my main point is to just know what you're gonna be shooting and be prepared. If a filter is used all the time, make sure it's a good one and try it out in different conditions and see how the light reacts to it.
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Old May 1st, 2006, 05:18 PM   #7
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Reflection

UV Filters are great protection. B + W, Hoya, Tiffen are all good. One thing I have noticed with the Z1 (and maybe Canon?) is that some times the filter causes a lens reflection that is a little wierd. It is somewhat akin to the lens flare and ghosting issue.
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Old May 2nd, 2006, 11:20 AM   #8
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The quality of the filter makes a difference. In this way, I sort of agree with Andrew, in that you've got this great lens, but what's the point if you throw a cheapy filter in front of it. Again, all I can say is that I shoot all the time with the B+W 010 Haze filter, with no issues. It wasn't cheap (I think just over $100) but from what people are saying, I guess it was worth it.
If some kid comes up to your camera and smears jelly on your lens, if you are carring your camera and someone scratches the lens by bumping it with an umbrella, no, its all not likely to happen, but if it does and your lens is damaged, you're going to relive the decision not to put a protective filter on your lens over and over.
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Old May 2nd, 2006, 05:42 PM   #9
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I shoot nearly past 9 years wildlife photos with many expensive canon lens without any protective glass. I bought my first new XL2 2 months ago, and first thing I did is bought two hoye UV as protective glass for 20x and 3x. then at the 2nd day of shooting for an interview with a villager, I dropped the 20x to its bayonet corner during I replace with 3x lens. in my early times of starting photography, I used russian zennith lens that cost not more than 50$, never dropped them even. now one of the front lens elements probably the stabilizer group has shifted axis so 20x lens doesnt focus properly !

as a conclusion; do not trust/consider too much of the protective glass, unless they can protected from thr evils eye :))

alkim.
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