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Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders
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Old July 10th, 2007, 05:26 PM   #1
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Foolish project

I have, somewhat foolishly, accepted a job shooting activity during a customer sailing event taking place in the Solent, between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight, this Thursday/Friday.

"Foolish?", I hear you cry - "sounds like great fun! And you're getting paid, right?".

Well yes, it's a paid job.

But it's foolish because I HATE the water/camera combination - I'm not afraid of the water, it's just that being on it with my eye up to a viewfinder for more than two minutes makes me hurl!!

I shot a music promo last summer with 20% boat-based content. Hurled.

In March I was shooting a charity video in Kenya and was invited to go out on a little boat to get footage of a school of around 150 dolphins. Saw them. Filmed them. Hurled over them. I hurled over 150 dolphins.

So, here's my question - forget tips about keeping the camera dry and free from salty breezes - how do I stop myself from becoming reacquainted with my breakfast?

Any and all advice welcomed - or I'll post clips of the outcome!

Cheers.

Ian . . .
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Old July 10th, 2007, 07:16 PM   #2
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Ah, the Solent - the wet part of my old stomping (or swimming?) ground!

You should be able to find an anti-emetic at a local chemist, especially Boots. A very common one is dimenhydrinate. In the US, the brand is Dramamine. When I have used it, I have found it very effective. I think the brand name may be the same in the UK. If not, the pharmacist will be able to recommend something.
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Old July 10th, 2007, 07:29 PM   #3
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An anti emetic,(I recommend Meclizine HCL - a pharmicist will have it, no prescription needed) and GINGER PILLS. Seriously, if you can't find ginger pills, then take a box of ginger-snap cookies.

Don't eat your typical english breakfast! (Sorry) Nothing like hurling good ole sausages, eggs, beans and grilled tomatoes. Have some toast and juice. Eat light, take the cookies, and 'keep 'em down'.

Also, it might help if you can take a small battery powered monitor. Get your eye off the viewfinder, and watch the monitor.

Good luck!
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Old July 10th, 2007, 07:53 PM   #4
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Ian,

Had the same experience about 10 years ago shooting 35mm stills from an airplane with the door off on a hot summer day. After going thru several thermals where the plane dropped and went up several hundred feet its all I could do to finish the assignment. When we got back down on the runway I practically kissed the ground. This was odd since I have flow in a variety of helicopters and single engine planes over the years. Guess what? I haven't been in a aircraft since and never plan to again. It's car, train or boat for me.

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Old July 10th, 2007, 08:49 PM   #5
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Also, when not shooting, take your eye off the viewfinder, and look OUT at the horizon as far as you can. Let your eye and inner ear adjust while looking at the horizon.
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Old July 11th, 2007, 01:15 AM   #6
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Dude, the Solent is beautiful sailing, unless you are going to shoot The Needles at the West end, then you very likely to be blowing chunks.
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Old July 11th, 2007, 03:03 AM   #7
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Thanks to all for wise advice!

I think we all know I'm gonna hurl . . .
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Old July 11th, 2007, 07:45 AM   #8
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Although this has no help to you, but thought i would let you know l live half a mile from the solent.. hehe little place called Netley Abbey.. :)
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Old July 12th, 2007, 12:42 AM   #9
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Stuart, you're right, no help!

But comforting to know there's someone I can turn to that understands the needs of a sea-sick cameraman!

I know the Southampton to Bournemouth coast quite well actually - my wife is from Lymington and her family is still there. I have to beg each year not to be dragged round the New Forest Show - they're members and go every day. Luckily this year I'm shooting a corporate that very week. Not a big fan of horses, tractors and home made jam.

Cheers!

Ian . . .
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Old July 12th, 2007, 08:13 AM   #10
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Hi Ian,

I'm a filmmaker, shooting on the water every day, and a boat captain... the best thing for you to do is either get the patch that you can buy at a pharmacy... it sticks behind your ear, and is good for 2 or 3 days I think... or the other is dramamine... take it before you go to bed the night before... not right before you get on the boat... it needs a little time to do it's thing...

hope this helps.
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Old July 12th, 2007, 08:49 AM   #11
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I second Richard's advice.

When I was still in Blighty, I did a lot of diving of the south coast. The worst times as far as getting sea sick were:

1. Having a stupidly large fry up for breakfast (problem is that's what is served at the B&B or whatever
2. Getting stupidly drunk the night before
3. Not being able to see the outside when on the boat - seeing what the waves are up to lets you predict (subconsciously) what is about to happen. When your inner ear detects the motion, your brain knows it is legit rather than born from some infection/toxin. Now, I always try to stay on deck, even if it means wearing my wetsuit and getting thoroughly drenched (plus I love the sound of the engines when running at full tilt!). I find I get nauseated most likely when the boat is going slowly or has stopped

The ginger thing is a great idea. It has a calming effect on the stomach and is a bactericide (it contains aristolochic acid). This is why it is eaten with sushi/sashumi in pickled form. Raw fish may contain bacteria, so the ginger helps prevent infection from it.

As I have learnt in the US (may just a southern thing), when people are feeling poorly with an iffy stomach, eating lime sherbet (sorbet-like) drenched in ginger ale does a great job at calming the stomach.

In addition to ginger pills, you can try the pickled ginger (available anywhere sushi is sold, probably even Tesco's), ginger ale or ginger beer (the spicier the better!). The ale or beer form has an added advantage of keeping you hydrated.

And if it all fails and you do hurl, rest assured you will get almost instant relief. Another great reliever is to jump in the water - not very practical in your case, though!

John

PS: By time you read this you will most likely have done your first day!
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Old July 12th, 2007, 12:56 PM   #12
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Maybe keep both eyes open. I know it's probably second-nature to close that left eye, but keeping it open and looking around every once in a while might stabilize ya.

Jonathan
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Old July 13th, 2007, 01:53 PM   #13
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OK, I'm back.

AND I DID NOT HURL!!! (sorry Paul) - but I have just made myself seasick by reviewing the footage! Can't win.

So, I'll post again tomorrow when I'm less nauseous and tell you what tips and tricks I used thanks to your generous advice! I'll also tell you why reading the instructions on medication is a good thing. Plus why avoiding alcohol with drugs that make you drowsy is sensible. Additionally I'll share with you why it's not clever to upset a seasoned yacht skipper by buzzing him on a rib at 30-something knots. Especially when you have to sit at his table that evening for dinner. When he's had about twelve pints. And he's from a rugged part of Scotland. And he has red hair. And red eyes. And he doesn't like boats with engines etc etc.

Until then . . .
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Old July 13th, 2007, 03:56 PM   #14
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Sometimes victory comes in small bites...

and swallows.
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