My thoughts on the HVX & XL-H1 - Page 3 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL H Series HDV Camcorders

Canon XL H Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XL H1S (with SDI), Canon XL H1A (without SDI). Also XL H1.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 24th, 2006, 05:22 PM   #31
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Hiltgen
While I never argue with casting a hot lead, I would like to suggest if you're truly interested in the girlfriend angle through directing, cast a smoking hot SUPPORTING actress.
lol, I don't know Nick....Since we're talking about UNDERWORLD.......it worked for Len Wiseman (director of both UNDERWORLDS). He snagged the leading lady Kate Beckinsale on the set of the original Underworld movie in 2003. Now their happily married, and he gets to ....um.... GREET her on a nightly basis. . *smile*

- ShannonRawls.com
__________________
Shannon W. Rawls ~ Motion Picture Producer & huge advocate of Digital Acquisition.
Shannon Rawls is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 06:43 PM   #32
HDV Cinema
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 4,007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shannon Rawls
See Steve, that's the thing....
These artifacts you speak of are all a hypothesis.
I suspect you simply haven't provoked interlace artifacts in your tests OR that you are so used to seeing them in your work that you simply automatically ignore them OR the displays you use simply can't show them.

Recent tests show that 50% of the HDTVs tested from Sony. Panasonic, etc. do NOT display more than 540-lines when fed 1080i. Despite some having 1080-rows of pixels -- the chips that do the deinterlaceing simply DO NOT output more than 540-lines of information to the display! (Same is true of CRTs!)

That means all the 1080i you have likely ever seen in your life has been on displays that have a FILTER that removed the interlace artifacts. The newer de-interlace chips fix this problem. So what you don't see NOW -- may become very visible to someone who owns/buys one of the newer monitors.

I'm doing a series on 1080i in HDV@Work for Video Systems. The first part has just gone on-line. I'll be covering these monitor tests and more in the coming month.
__________________
Switcher's Quick Guide to the Avid Media Composer >>> http://home.mindspring.com/~d-v-c
Steve Mullen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 06:59 PM   #33
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 853
Ok Steve. I understand. I'll take my chances.

- ShannonRawls.com
__________________
Shannon W. Rawls ~ Motion Picture Producer & huge advocate of Digital Acquisition.
Shannon Rawls is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 09:35 PM   #34
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Wyomissing, PA
Posts: 1,141
Images: 57
Steve, only 540 lines? that's interesting. Can you point me to some reputable reads/articles on that? If this is true, kinda changes perspective on what is shot today, and how it may look like when 'real' HD tv's hit the floor.
Peter Ferling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 09:38 PM   #35
HDV Cinema
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 4,007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shannon Rawls
Ok Steve. I understand. I'll take my chances.
I should have added, that with these new display chips -- and likely the 24F chip in the Canon -- that de-interlacing is getting so sophisticated that under most all conditions you won't see de-interlace artifacts (combing, etc.).

But what about interlace artifacts -- line-flicker and line-twitter -- I see on even broadcast HD. The new display chips should make these more visible.

Shannon, if you have time -- can you try two simple tests.

1) shoot a brick building starting at wide. Now very, very, slowly zoom in. On playback -- do you see a point where some of the horizontal lines become so thin they exist in only one field and thus flicker at 30Hz? (You may not see them in the VF.)

2) shoot a brick building starting at wide. Now zoom until until you see the horizontal lines distinctly, but not so far they become thick lines. Now pan UP and DOWN the side of the building. On playback -- as you pan, do the hortizontal bricks seem to "twitter."
__________________
Switcher's Quick Guide to the Avid Media Composer >>> http://home.mindspring.com/~d-v-c
Steve Mullen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 25th, 2006, 01:24 AM   #36
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Atlanta GA
Posts: 1,427
Shannon I was speaking purely on economies of scale. See if you have the amount of money to throw behind a movie that underworld took (or to be honest the amount of money for publicity) then totally cast the hot lead, but until that day comes, stick with the supporting actress theory... (especially in college/ filmschool)

So steve are you saying that the camera produces a better image in 24f then it does in 60i?
__________________
I have a dream that one day canon will release a 35mm ef to xl adapter and I'll have iris control and a 35mm dof of all my ef lenses, and it will be awesome...
Nick Hiltgen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 25th, 2006, 06:01 AM   #37
Trustee
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 1,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Mullen
I should have added, that with these new display chips -- and likely the 24F chip in the Canon -- that de-interlacing is getting so sophisticated that under most all conditions you won't see de-interlace artifacts (combing, etc.).

But what about interlace artifacts -- line-flicker and line-twitter -- I see on even broadcast HD. The new display chips should make these more visible.

Shannon, if you have time -- can you try two simple tests.

1) shoot a brick building starting at wide. Now very, very, slowly zoom in. On playback -- do you see a point where some of the horizontal lines become so thin they exist in only one field and thus flicker at 30Hz? (You may not see them in the VF.)

2) shoot a brick building starting at wide. Now zoom until until you see the horizontal lines distinctly, but not so far they become thick lines. Now pan UP and DOWN the side of the building. On playback -- as you pan, do the hortizontal bricks seem to "twitter."
This effect can be produced regardless of whether the source is interlaced or progressive, all that you need is an interlaced display running at a lower res than the source. I've had to deal with this very issue putting HiRes stills into SD video, in fact I can get artifacts way worse than line twitter, on some stills I can get the whole frame to blink at around 1Hz. I can confirm that the effect is not seen on a progessive scan display that does display 1920x1080 from 1080i source nor does it appear on a SD LCD after downscaling.
Bob Grant is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL H Series HDV Camcorders

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:56 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network