XL H1 Ideal for weddings? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

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Canon XL H Series HDV Camcorders
Canon XL H1S (with SDI), Canon XL H1A (without SDI). Also XL H1.


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Old October 3rd, 2006, 03:10 AM   #16
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I use both the XL1S and XL2 to shoot weddings all year. I'm considering bumping up to the H1 because I want HD and because I have a whole case of batteries, chargers, lights and other accessories that I can still use. Even if the H1 wasn't the best choice, I have so much invested accessories that it would be foolish to buy something else. The ‘ooh and ahh’ factor is always powerful with the XL line.

A little advice for those that have a problem with the weight, I use the Manfrotto 557B Pro Video Monopod on both of my XL's and it is the best thing ever. I can move anywhere in a split second and when I get to where I need to be, I'm as steady as a tripod. An added benefit, when the audience in the chapel stands when the bride comes down the aisle or when the happy couple is dancing in the middle of a sea of people on the dance floor, I can raise the camera four feet or more in the air and I get the shot. I’ve had to edit tape of other camera operators and it amazes me at how many operators get burned by those little problems.

Now, by being stuck in the XL line, from a practical perspective, what am I missing out on from other manufactures when I do get the H1? I also shoot a lot of green screen stuff for industrial videos. How will the H1 help me those settings?
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Old October 8th, 2006, 09:20 PM   #17
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Camera Weight Issue

Having worked in television news for 40 years, I can tell you the 'weight' issue of the Canon HD-1 is non-existent. I use it for television news, and for us, it is one of the lightest cameras on the market for its power and features.

Most professional television news cameras are far heavier and yet most in the business seldom complain about the weight.

As to the 'forward heavy' portion of the thread, it is easily correctable. I use two wireless mikes on the rear and it balances perfectly.

Having the camera on my shoulder, as many have pointed out, provides a steadier picture and far greater access to all controls than using other non-shoulder mount cameras.

The camera is so light, most in TV news can hand-hold it all day and never be tired.

Like others, my only issue is with the viewfinder. I'm hoping they come out with a better quality for professional users.

It's a great camera for the money and if I were a wedding photographer, I'd snap it up in a minute.
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Old October 9th, 2006, 12:27 PM   #18
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I use H1 as first camera, other two are Sony FX1, and A1, shooting weddings if client wants HDV format, othervise I use DVX100, H1 has a great stability handheld, greatly balanced camera, can't wait for wide angle HD lens, it will be unbeatable at this point for shooting weddings...
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Old October 9th, 2006, 12:38 PM   #19
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The issue of Canon cameras being heavy is such an old argument and goes way back to the days of the XL1 and VX1000. Back then there were huge debates all over the place about shoulder cameras vs handheld cameras.

It all comes down to two schools of thought on the subject. There are those who feel you can only shoot a good wedding with a handheld camera. Then there are those who feel you can only do a decent job with a shoulder mounted camera.

There are hundreds of people all over the world that have made a great success at shooting weddings with the Canon XL1 series of cameras. I for one was one of the first people to have a XL1 and I have used it for hundreds of weddings and other types of live shoots.

If the camera is off of a support system such as a tripod the Canon H1 may be heavy but how good is your shooting holding a handheld camera for 10 to 20 minutes anyways? Can you really it sturdy the whole time? There really are pros and cons to each style of camera and there is no perfect answer or opinion on the subject. Shoulder mounted cameras can have a small learning curve but when you do learn how to shoot with them in the proper way you can get very good results. That is why a lot of high end wedding videographers and most broadcasters use the huge shoulder mounted cameras. It isn't just because they are 1/2" and 2/3" cameras but they feel the form factor can give them much better results in a live environment. Handheld does have advantages as well such as quick movements and extreme angles. With carefull practice you can get almost the same results with a bigger camera but you have to put a little effort and muscle behind it. I have held a 25 pound camera above my head with one arm as a second camera during a Hora during the entire dance and while it took more muscle it can be done. I am far from a strong person and do not work out at all but I just put a lot of heart and effort into a shoot and it doesn't bother me.
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Old December 18th, 2006, 01:24 PM   #20
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Well I`ve bought one!

And im very happy :)


Its a great wedding camera, much easier to use in the field than the Sony PD170`s
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Old December 18th, 2006, 02:23 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen Vallis
And im very happy :)


Its a great wedding camera, much easier to use in the field than the Sony PD170`s

Congratulations Stephen, you will love it!

Mike
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Old December 18th, 2006, 03:13 PM   #22
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I am a big fan of this camera but I did a wedding this weekend and I got caught in a situation where I could not get time to get back on the tripod for a long speech. Damn my arm hurts really bad today! The shots were ultimately pretty good with just a little wiggle when I tried to change positions as my arm was tiring.

The sad part was my tripod was just a few feet away but there was never enough of a break in the action to put the camera on the tripod! That was the longest 25 minutes of my arms life!

:)
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Old December 18th, 2006, 03:16 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Marty Hudzik
I am a big fan of this camera but I did a wedding this weekend and I got caught in a situation where I could not get time to get back on the tripod for a long speech. Damn my arm hurts really bad today! The shots were ultimately pretty good with just a little wiggle when I tried to change positions as my arm was tiring.

The sad part was my tripod was just a few feet away but there was never enough of a break in the action to put the camera on the tripod! That was the longest 25 minutes of my arms life!

:)

Been there. That's where you need those good cut-a-way crowd shots!

Mike
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Old December 18th, 2006, 04:01 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Mike Teutsch
Been there. That's where you need those good cut-a-way crowd shots!

Mike

Unfortunately this was a rare occurrence where I shot the reception with only one camera. I usually work with another person and we coordinate moving and angle changes so that there is always a "usable" shot. When you are by yourself you have to play it safer and not be as creative. But sometimes you have to do what the client wants. This particualr one did not want to pay for the 2nd camera. So they get a less creative product in the end as I have to be overly safe on everything I shoot.
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Old December 20th, 2006, 03:23 PM   #25
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I used a mono pod when filming last week, It made life a lot easier!
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Old December 20th, 2006, 03:54 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Stephen Vallis
I used a mono pod when filming last week, It made life a lot easier!

What make and model works with the H1? It seems a bit on the heavy side for most cheap monopods.

Thanks!
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Old December 20th, 2006, 04:39 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Marty Hudzik
What make and model works with the H1? It seems a bit on the heavy side for most cheap monopods.

Thanks!



I used a Manfrotto, not sure of the model number tho
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Old December 20th, 2006, 07:19 PM   #28
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Using a monopod is different than a video tripod head. I have a Manfroto monopod and it is great. Supporting a camcorder to keep it stable is different than picking a video head that is made for a certain weight. It is not going to collapse under the weight, just helps you support or hold the camcorder.

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Old December 20th, 2006, 09:27 PM   #29
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I tried using a monopd a couple of times, first with my XL2 then with the H1.It really didn't work for me. At weddings, I try to use the tripod for the ceremony, and my steady stick or hand held for the rest. I just ordered the multirig pro from danny natovich. It's gotten great reviews, and I'm looking forward to using it.
I had better luck with the monopod shooting with my smaller Sony FX1.
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Old December 21st, 2006, 09:11 AM   #30
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IMHO the big advantage of all shoulder mount cams is that they leave your fingers on the buttons. To me the multirig is a step backwards.

The big issue for me is how quickly I can go from tripod to shoulder mount and back. Any support device has to incorporate a quick release.

BTW anyone know what happened to dvcaddie.com - site is not there
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