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Old December 22nd, 2003, 09:56 PM   #1
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sennheiser wireless microphones with XL-1

Does anybody know if there's any sound quality difference between the Sennheiser Evoulution 100 and Evolultion 500 UHF wireless systems or is just
more bells and whistles with the more expensive Evo 500? I have the EVO 500
Lavelier setup but want to add a second setup but don't want to shell out another $800 if I don't have too.
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Old December 23rd, 2003, 10:32 PM   #2
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I'll have to do a little checking but you get a few more frequency memories in bot the xmitter and receivers. I also think the 500 receiver is diversity receiver unlike the 100 series.

The extra memories would be very nice feature, especially in a busy location. However, the 100 is a very nice solid performer.

If you are going to spend $800 you may want to look at other manufacturers systems that are even more professional.
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Old December 25th, 2003, 09:36 AM   #3
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Nathan,

Any other manufacturer suggestions that are better than Sennheiser in the $800.00 range?
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Old December 29th, 2003, 10:06 AM   #4
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I am not sure. Lecrosonics is one that comes recommended but I think it is closer to $1,000.
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Old December 30th, 2003, 12:21 PM   #5
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Actually, the 100 claims to be diversity as well, even though it has only one antenna rod.

John, are you talking $800 list price or actual street price? The Evo 100 ENG kit lists for 800+ but I got mine for less than 500.
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Old December 31st, 2003, 05:16 AM   #6
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How can they do diversity with only one antenna. That makes no sense, unles they are using two differnt x-mit frequencies at the same time, which is very unlikely.
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Old January 5th, 2004, 02:56 PM   #7
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Don, I agree, it takes two separate antennas--preferably spaced at least 1/4 wavelength apart--to do true diversity. And they are definitely not on any more than one frequency at a time (not that doing that would provide sufficiently discrete paths to accomplish the ends of diversity). So I was a bit puzzled at the claims of having a diversity receiver. (I even started wondering if they might be using the metal case as a second antenna.)

Here's where the confusion comes in--and it took me a visit to the manual to figure it out--there are two different models of receivers in the EVO 100 series. Often a dealer ad or website description will mention diversity receiver in the general notes for the series, without distinguishing by individual model. The EM100 receiver, which is the half-rack model, does have two antenna jacks and whips, thus true diversity. The EK100, which Sennheiser calls the "pocket receiver" and which we think of as the camera-mount model, is the one that is supplied in the ENG kit, and it has but a single front end.

The good news is that so far I have found the radio performance of this kit to be first-rate, knock on wood.
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Old January 12th, 2004, 12:30 PM   #8
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Mike is right, the 100 series are not true diversity. The rack mount systems are.

That said, the non-diversity systems perfomance is first-rate and I have yet to have a drop out except when exceeding the rated range.
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Old February 11th, 2004, 10:51 PM   #9
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Try the AKG wireless .. it got true digital diversity and uses AA batteries for transmiiter and AAA batteries for receiver (2 antennas). Sound is good - if not comparable with Sennheiser's. The lavalier cable of the AKG is a lot much thicker (and less prone to breakage) than Sennheiser's.
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Old February 12th, 2004, 10:41 AM   #10
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Nathan, what is the rated range? I personally tested the EVO in the field (literally) and had my daughter walk up the road wearing the xmitter (and me with the rcvr plugged into my camera and listening on the cans). When she got nearly 1/4 mile away and I could still hear her Steve Maddens clip-clopping on the ground and the water gurgling in the creek, I told her to turn around. Hey, in video production, it's good enough sound if you can still hear them when you can no longer see them! :-)

TingSern Wong, do you have a model number? I recently looked up one AKG model that meets that description, but it doesn't seem very easily available in the U.S. and very little info available on it (one dealer offering the model--as special order only--didn't have a picture, and I haven't seen any magazine reviews of that model, I forget which one)

As for breakage, I do know one thing, the Sennheiser case is solid metal, unlike the A/T, Azden and Samson models I have owned, which can help if you drop it. As for batteries, it uses a 9V, which by my non-scientific way of thinking would tend to allow higher-power circuitry than 3 volts, maybe with shorter battery life as a tradeoff.
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Old February 12th, 2004, 10:58 AM   #11
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The AKG model I have is -

Transmitter = UHF PT40
Receiver = UHF PR40

Disadvantage of AKG versus Sennheiser -
Got only one frequency (fixed). You need matching transmitter and receiver. BUT, again, how many times do we really need to change frequencies?

Advantages?
Receiver has dual antenna (and true digital diversity). It is NOT a digital transmitter/receiver however. Signals still go by analog - UHF frequency, FM. The lavalier cable is much thicker (and I judge, less prone to breakage) than Sennheiser's version.
Uses AA and AAA batteries, versus 9V batteries on Sennheiser. I can even use NiMH 2300mAh and 800mAh on the AKG. Very much lower operating costs. Also, try finding 9V in some parts of your country?

TS
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Old February 12th, 2004, 02:16 PM   #12
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I think the rated range is about 250 feet and it will work just fine at that range and more. I do not know how many hours the Sennheiser will work on 9 volt battery. I know its more than 2 or 3 hours. Though I only use fresh batts for important shoots, even the stale ones seem to work just fine.

Its the fact that the Sennheiser is such a well made machine that earns it high marks. You get a lot bang for your buck.

BTW, I don't berate other peoples gear. If your EVO is working great, that's what this board is for; to let other people know what works.
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Old February 12th, 2004, 04:20 PM   #13
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Nathan, I don't berate O.P.'s gear either, although I do allow myself the latitude of pointing out the weaknesses of some of the gear I already own (less rugged case on some of the models I bought before the Senn.)

TingSern, thanks for the model number. Here are some interesting comments:

http://mixonline.com/ar/audio_akg_adds_wms/


http://namm.harmony-central.com/WNAM.../PR/PR-40.html

http://www.americanmusical.com/st/as...eless%20System

http://www.samedaymusic.com/product--AKGWMS40407

One dealer is quoting 35 hour+ battery life for the PT 40 xmitter! That's phenomenal. I can't imagine I'd ever get anywhere near that on the 9 volt, although I just don't know, I have never kept them in until they're dead, choosing instead to do like Nathan and put in new ones before each important shoot. As for finding 9 volt batteries in my country? Just about anywhere batteries are sold, from drugstores to gas stations, Home Depot, WalMart, etc. Yes 9V are more expensive than AA, especially if they don't last as long.

As for the usefulness of frequency agility, well, I have had single-frequency and two-frequency systems, and most of the time it's not a problem...but if just ONCE, you are on a critical shoot and someone is already using that freq., or if there is a lot of noise or interference, the ability to change freq. becomes worth its weight in gold. Just another one of the many trade-offs we make when choosing a/v gear.

One thing I am convinvced of, that whether or not it comes with true diversity or switchable frequency, a UHF system is well worth the difference over VHF.
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Old February 12th, 2004, 06:57 PM   #14
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Actually, I can't see why the AKG should be less tough than the Sennheiser's. My friend has the Sennheiser. Both AKG and Sennheiser are metal casing. (I checked - sorry, Sennheiser is metal, but AKG is fibreglass). But, I don't think fibreglass is that easy to break either.

That 35 hours runtime applies to the transmitter (AA) using normal alkaline batteries. If you feed it with 2300mAh NiMH Sanyo batteries, it goes up to 56 hours - that's as far as I can test :-).

The receiver gets much lower - because it uses only AAA batteries. 9 hours if alkaline and 13-15 hours if using 800mAh NiMH batteries.

YES - I agree there are risks involved in wireless gear using one fixed frequency. However, the UHF band is a lot much less crowded than VHF ... so, there is less chance of interference.

My ideal will be a mix combining the best of Sennheiser and AKG :-). Heh, are the Germans & Austrians listening? Namely, a Sennheiser model that uses only AA batteries.

TS
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Old February 12th, 2004, 07:39 PM   #15
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TS,
Having owned several boats and two Corvettes, I totally endorse the toughness of fiberglass (although being an insulator and not a conductor it has no shielding properties, nor would it be a good choice for a hand mic body to be used with a plug-on transmitter which uses the mic body as an antenna). Fiberglass is a much stronger material than the typical polystyrene used in the cabinets of those earlier wireless systems I owned.

What really gets me intrigued about the PT40 is its extreme battery life; you could leave the thing on all day long! Their competitors have some catching up to do in that department. Maybe the Germans and Austrians are listening. These are both high-quality companies, I have a couple of AKG conventional mics, and have owned both Sennheiser and AKG headphones.

One thing peculiar about the Senny, and I don't know how the PR40 addresses this because I am not personally familiar with it, the EVO receiver has an XLR cable which plugs right into the MA100, which would suggest that it is balanced, but it truly is not. Very little consequence with the 18 inch long cable, but it would be nice if it were actually a balanced output.
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