Saturation problems with the XL1.... at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog

Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog
Can't find it on the XL1 Watchdog site? Discuss it here.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 20th, 2002, 07:50 PM   #1
VinnyDaKid
 
Posts: n/a
Saturation problems with the XL1....

Can somebody offer me some advice? I'm a novice filmmaker (just bought the Xl1 last December)....every time I shoot outdoors..the footage comes back COMPLETELY desaturated. I was at the beach yesterday on a gorgeous sunny afternoon...beautiful blue sky, golden sand and green ocean....and all the footage is practically black and white because it is soooo desaturated. I've shot both manual and in that "Green Box" setting...I've got the ND filter on...what could I be doing wrong?

Thanks in advance!

Vinny
  Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2002, 09:34 PM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Glendale, AZ
Posts: 57
HELLO,
May I suggest that you stay away from the green box.

The other problem is the beach. You might as well be in the snow. If you go to F/18+ with the ND filter and still have a problem, try changing the shutter speed( if a XL-1 and not the "s" , go to your manual pg.45 top of pg. If this doesn't work I'd send it in under warranty.

Good Luck

Bruce
__________________
There are only three things that will kill you: Bad Luck, Stupidity, and Time.
Bruce Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2002, 09:44 PM   #3
Obstreperous Rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: San Marcos, TX
Posts: 26,900
Images: 513
Yes, stay out of Green Box mode. While you're at it, stay out of Manual mode until you truly feel like a master of the camera. If I were you, I'd shoot in Av (aperture priority) mode. Set the exposure to something in the middle, like f/5.6 or thereabouts. The shutter will automatically compensate for the bright sunlight. You should see much better color. If not, try adding more ND, through more powerful screw-on Neutral density filters over the lens or a matte box with larger drop-in ND filters. If I'm not mistaken, a polarizing filter will help too, maybe someone else can weigh in on that.
__________________
CH

Search DV Info Net | DV Info Net Sponsors | A Decade (+5) of DVi | ...Tuesday is Soylent Green Day!
Chris Hurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2002, 09:55 PM   #4
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
One more recommendation. Given the beach setting you noted, make sure you have a UV Haze filter on the lens, too. This is one setting where this filter can provide more than just lens protection for your shooting. It won't alter your exposure per se, but it can keep you from getting the blues.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2002, 11:18 PM   #5
VinnyDaKid
 
Posts: n/a
Thank you

Thank you all very much! I'm going to give those suggestions a try and see what happens!

Vinny
  Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2002, 12:28 AM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chigasaki, Japan.
Posts: 1,660
Just one more to confuse you a bit more. I shoot surfing quite a bit and I alwas use the folloying settings with good results.

AV Mode f5.6
ND off
Circular Polarizer
gain - 3db
Adrian Douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2002, 06:51 AM   #7
Obstreperous Rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: San Marcos, TX
Posts: 26,900
Images: 513
Thanks Adrian, you confirmed what I thought would work... Av mode at f/5.6. I figured a polarizer would help. Do you use a UV filter also?
__________________
CH

Search DV Info Net | DV Info Net Sponsors | A Decade (+5) of DVi | ...Tuesday is Soylent Green Day!
Chris Hurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2002, 11:47 AM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 182
I'm about to make a post about settings. Check it out.


Test out the camera! You can not trust auto modes if you want truly beautiful shots. It can work, but generally only in a vastly changing environment.

It sounds like an exposure problem. In cameraland, the saying was f/8 and pray. Well video is much less forgiving than negatives. It requires precise settings, much like shooting slides (what you see [on the slide] is what you get).
__________________
< >< . . . . . < >< . . . . . < ><
John Klein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2002, 08:44 AM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Morgan, Vermont
Posts: 130
settings for snow

Just got through reading the posts on shooting in snow conditions. Seems that using Av is the best answer for starters and then going on from there.

I am just wondering about filters. I have the regular lens that came with my xL-1. Where do I get a uv filter and polarizing filter. I assume you can't use the two together?
Tim Palmer-Benson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2002, 09:19 AM   #10
Trustee
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chigasaki, Japan.
Posts: 1,660
You can most certainly use the two together. I have a UV filter permmantly on my lens and alwys use a polarizer when shooting outdoors. you can get the filters from any good camera shop. I have found the best results with a circular polarizer but other people here find that a linear polarizer produces good results to.

One more thing that is particularly important when shooting in snow is to set your Exposure Compensation Dial to +1-2 stops. As the snow reflects a lot of light your camera will want to shut down the apature therefore reducing the amount of light hitting the CCDs. This results in grey snow and the desaturated colours that Vinny was experiencing. Also don't use the auto focus as it doesn't deal with the snow very well.
Adrian Douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2002, 10:02 AM   #11
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 38
I think I once shot in AV mode, and ended up getting a strobing effect, kinda like a flicker.
Is that the shutter trying to compensate for the various light conditions?

Please advise thanks,
Shlooky
Elie Zakaria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2002, 02:47 PM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 2,053
Regarding shooting at the beach, I shoot here in Hawaii and have a fair amount of experience at it. Beach sand usually isn't nearly as bright as snow so it's very possible to get good detail off the sand and in the lighter shadows.

The problem could be over-exposure. Set your exposure manually and use the camera's zebra stripes, making sure you don't see any of the zebra pattern show up anywhere except in the clouds and off bright spots in the water.

Even white objects shouldn't show much zebra pattern.

Hope this helps.

Dean Sensui
Base Two Productions
Dean Sensui is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:25 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network