Corporate Video Production at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog

Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog
Can't find it on the XL1 Watchdog site? Discuss it here.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 4th, 2002, 07:05 PM   #1
Quantum Productions
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Posts: 161
Corporate Video Production

I'm going to create a 20 to 30min coporate video for a company that wants to play this video at a dinner for a few hundred people. The video will show past winners from the previous year talking about the award they won.

I have to go to their office and tape 6 different people doing their jobs and also some interviews. The lighting inside, I'm sure, is fluorescents and I need and idea of what kind of lighting I should do. I will be using my XL1, wireless mic, lens, etc. I probably will have them at their desk talking to an interviewer off camera.

Thanks for any input!
__________________
Adam Wakely,
Quantum Productions
Adam Wakely is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 07:48 PM   #2
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
One of the hardest things to work with is mixed lighting. If you can eliminate the mix of daylight, tungsten and flourescent to just one light type you'll be way ahead of the game. Turn out lights, close shades or drapes, what ever it takes. If you have to deal with mixed lighting try to have your subjects in only one light type and filter the others to match if possible. If they won't let you have that much time, you can do what the news guys do. Over power the existing light with on camera quartz lighting. It will be harsh, but you may be able to soften it with on camera filters and bouncing the light off a reflector or low ceiling.


I had a similar job for a client one time and I wasn't allowed to do much for lighting. I talked them into letting me convert it to B & W. It was that, or green award winners from the flourescent lights.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 10:16 PM   #3
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 8,308
Gel off all the overhead flourescents to correct their colour. Of course, that won't leave much light, so I'd bring a set of lights with you and set up at each desk.

I'm with Jeff on overpowering the existing lights too. Not a bad idea. Possibly less hassle than dealing with shutting down other lights. Less hassle is good.

Sounds like fun. I'm currently doing camera work for a coporate video downtown. Should be done shooting tomorrow, which is good cause I really need a day where I can sleep in past 6am.
Dylan Couper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 10:24 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 730
Why not fight fire with fire?


One of the best ways to nuetralise fluro's is to use more fluro...

Get one of those lighting panels of pro grade fluro's and pirch it up facing into the interviewer, it will neutralise the strobing effect, is a simple little package that fits into a breifcase style holder and totally portable and takes 5 mins to setup.

Also these pro fluro's which are very cheap are rated at 3200k which means no more green effects, but you could always adjust the white balance a little more yellow to achieve less green again.


kermie

email me if u want me to find more info.
Zac Stein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 11:03 PM   #5
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 8,308
The lights Kermie is talking about are excellent. And even better than regular lights, they run cooler. I used these in a recent shoot with very good results, however, we still gelled all the ceiling flourescents.
Dylan Couper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 11:06 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 730
Dylan Yes, they are great arn't they!! and cheap too :)

But if time is an issue they will basicly help you imensely, and take only minutes to get going, just a little composition and attention to placement and you are cooking, it won't be perfect without further work, but realistically only you the video maker will be able to see where the lighting could have been improved.


kermie
Zac Stein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 11:34 PM   #7
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
Lighting will probably be a challenge. But SOUND might be your biggest problem if these folks are in an open-office setting. Office sounds that you wouldn't even notice on-site will sound like special foley effects on tape. Bring a good directional mic.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2002, 11:36 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 730
Yeah, or use a lapel...

I love them... work so well, especially in this kind of instance where a mic wouldn't really need to be too hidden, it is after all an interview.


:)
Zac Stein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2002, 12:14 AM   #9
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 8,308
Lapel mics are usualy the way to go, but if you need them hidden you might have problems from picking up all the sound from the "talent" moving around. We had to re-shoot several times because a woman kept brushing her lapel with her arm while going for a telephone.
I'm starting to think that Ken might be right with a good unidirectional mic. No clothing noise, and hopefully close enough to seperate the talents voice from other office noise.
Dylan Couper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2002, 12:22 AM   #10
Quantum Productions
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Posts: 161
Thanks all for the excellent tips!

It's great practice to ask this site for help on video shoots!
I haven't even started my shoot and the information is unbelievable!

Sound is not a problem for me as I play a band and have been the sound man for it for years. I love video but sound is my "specialty". But I get better sales in video, not audio! :(
(musicians are usely too poor!) :)

I'm hoping to do all the interview sections in one office room!
That way there will be no other noise. As for lighting, I work for Westburne/Rexel Electric here in Canada and I like the idea of using floresents bulbs! I can get ANY type from work and make my own! (all at that special price!)

Keep the comments coming! Nice to here from the experts!
__________________
Adam Wakely,
Quantum Productions
Adam Wakely is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2002, 12:32 AM   #11
Quantum Productions
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Posts: 161
Hey Dylan! Fix that "British Columbia" in your personal info section! It drives me nuts when I see a speeeling mistek! :)
__________________
Adam Wakely,
Quantum Productions
Adam Wakely is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2002, 03:29 AM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 27
Hi Adam,

I use a Lowel Totalight kit which basically involves bouncing a light into the inside of a silvered umbrella on a stand. Some people use a translucent umbrella and shine light through it. A couple of these or similar will do a great job. When you start reeling the money in, get a DedoLight kit which will allow you to do supplementary rim lighting and coloured accent backgrounds.

For the interviews make sure the camera is as close to the interviewer as possible and try putting the soft light above the camera.

Jim
Jim Nicholls is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2002, 07:16 AM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: NH
Posts: 95
Article in videomaker

about shooting multiple interviews in an office location. You may find a useful tip or two in this article.

http://www.videomaker.com/scripts/article.cfm?id=9014

Marc
__________________
Marc Betz
Marc Betz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2002, 01:16 AM   #14
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 8,308
<<<-- Originally posted by Adam Wakely : Hey Dylan! Fix that "British Columbia" in your personal info section! It drives me nuts when I see a speeeling mistek! :) -->>>

Doh! I've never even noticed that! Thanks. Got it fixt gud an propur now!
Dylan Couper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2003, 03:22 AM   #15
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 33
Hey Zac,

Can you tell me more about those pro fluro's? Is there a manufactuer? Is there a website?

Thanks,
Bryant
Bryant Sentosa is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:37 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network