New XL1S has problems stablizing and focusing at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog

Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog
Can't find it on the XL1 Watchdog site? Discuss it here.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 18th, 2002, 04:04 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 53
New XL1S has problems stablizing and focusing

Hi, first time here and love the forum.

I have a new XL1s...a sturdy tripod and fluid head. However, when panning/tilting using the tripod, the lens (I assume) takes several seconds (up to 9 sec sometimes) to stablize and settle. For example, I can pan slowly to the left and stop...but the image doesn't stop moving. It looks as if the stablization is trying to make up its mind for a few seconds as it moves around trying to find a settling spot. This doesn't happen when I turn off lens stablization.

Another problem that really bothers me is the focus while slow zooming. I read a few articles on the focusing complaints but I think my problem hasn't been discussed in the articles I have read. Here goes:
when I use the slow zoom feature, the lens loses focus and tries to regain it but cannot until I stop zooming in. The lens and uv filter are clean and free of dirt and smudges.
Chris Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 18th, 2002, 06:36 AM   #2
RED Code Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Holland
Posts: 12,514
The first problem you are describing comes from the simple fact
that you are trying to stabilize something that is already stable!!
Why are you doing that? Turn off the stabalizer when on a
tripod doing pans (which are the most obvious as well). A low
shutter speed (below 1/50 or 1/60 ?) might also cause such
effects I think.

Now about the second problem. I've also had this and it just
looks like the camera doesn't know where to focus anymore
(things go too fast). This mainly seem to happen in lower shutter
speeds (like 1/25th or 1/30th) which produces a more blurry
image when moving/zooming. I usually switch to manual
focussing in those shots and everything is fine. Just turn of
auto focus, zoom in to how far you want, focus (and/or hit
Push AF) and then zoom back out. Begin your recording and
slowly zoom in. No problems.
__________________

Rob Lohman, visuar@iname.com
DV Info Wrangler & RED Code Chef

Join the DV Challenge | Lady X

Search DVinfo.net for quick answers | Buy from the best: DVinfo.net sponsors
Rob Lohman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 18th, 2002, 07:12 AM   #3
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
Try removing the filter and see if that makes any difference. Not all filters are created equal. The AF works by contrast. If the scene is low contrast or lacks distinct vertical lines the AF can hunt for something to focus on. This can be overcome by use of additional lights, reframing the scene to allow for vertical lines or switching to manual focus (a challenge in itself). The XL1 manual suggests turning off the IS when the camera is mounted on a tripod, as Rob stated.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 18th, 2002, 12:47 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 53
reply

Thank you for the great help.....
I feel dumb about the stablization stuff.... :)

Jeff, I did remove the filter and have the same problem. The scene is highly contrasted and lighting is good. About the vertical lines, are you saying that I can only get good AF while slow zooming on vertcal lines? Let's say I have a person in focus standing a good distance behind a vertical line (ie, a building). If I slow zoom in on the person, will the camera try to focus on the vertical line even if it is to the extreme left or right from the center of the frame? Or will the vertical line help the AF to keep the focus on the person in the middle of the frame and who is already in focus?

Thanks again for the help.
Chris Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 12:08 AM   #5
Obstreperous Rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: San Marcos, TX
Posts: 26,900
Images: 513
One limitation of any servo-controlled zoom lens with rear focus groups (common to most all DV camcorders, not just the XL1) is that zoom and focus will not work at the same time. If the lens is set to auto focus, the focus will hunt during the zoom and won't settle until you stop zooming. The way to get around this is to set the focus to manual, zoom in and focus on the most distant element in the shot to establish critical focus. Then zoom back out. Focus is preserved and you can pull your slow zoom without having the focus change. You must always have auto focus turned off if you expect to do slow zooms, just as you must always turn image stabilization off when the camera is mounted on a tripod. Otherwise the image stabilization fights the pan, resulting in undesirable image shake. Hope this helps,
__________________
CH

Search DV Info Net | DV Info Net Sponsors | A Decade (+5) of DVi | ...Tuesday is Soylent Green Day!
Chris Hurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 01:53 AM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Glendale, AZ
Posts: 181
Chrissimmons,

try this:
1.) autofocus off
2.) stabilizer off
3.) set camera to M
4.) most important: set-up of zoom shot as follows.

subject-----------> S


let's say distance between S & X = 20ft.



YOU----------------> X

1.) zoom from X (you) all the way to s (subject)
2.) focus on S (subject)
3.) zoom out to desired framing
4.) now when you zoom in, all will be in focus ( unless you are wide open,
I.E f/1.8) try to stick to f/5.6 unless you desire an almost zero D of F ( f/1.8)
5.) Now if you remain at X and subject remains at S , you can zoom in or out and
not loose focus. ( if S or X moves foreward or backward, you will loose focus and have to repeat steps 1 to 4.)

Try it you'll like it!

Bruce
B. Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 01:18 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 53
Thanks alot for the help.

I tried to do manual focus throughout the entire event...but the viewfinder sucks big time! My results were soft throughout the 2 hours of footage.....this is bad! Looks like I need a small CHEAP monitor...any suggestions?

I will use the method you guys described.
Chris Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 01:56 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Glendale, AZ
Posts: 181
Is cheap under $500 but above $400 or over $500 but under $1000?

Bruce
B. Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 02:07 PM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 53
I was looking more of under 400...but what are your experiences and what do you suggest?
Chris Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 02:24 PM   #10
Obstreperous Rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: San Marcos, TX
Posts: 26,900
Images: 513
See my article, "Top Five XL1 Accessories," in the articles section of the XL1 Watchdog at www.dvinfo.net/xl1.htm

An adequate inexpensive LCD monitor for focusing and framing is the VariZoom VZ-TFT listed on that page... also the NebTek monitor listed there as well. Hope this helps,
__________________
CH

Search DV Info Net | DV Info Net Sponsors | A Decade (+5) of DVi | ...Tuesday is Soylent Green Day!
Chris Hurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2002, 02:27 PM   #11
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 53
Thanks Chris....I am on it.
Chris Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2002, 11:48 AM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 182
If you're by AC power, I'd suggest a small tv with composite inputs. Better than anything else, and way cheaper.
__________________
< >< . . . . . < >< . . . . . < ><
John Klein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2002, 03:04 PM   #13
Slash Rules!
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 4,723
A small TV is a good idea, but beware, it won't show the underscanned portion of the frame (unless I'm totally wrong and it will). The LCD monitors do show the whole frame.
Josh Bass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2002, 03:42 PM   #14
Sponsor: JET DV
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 7,873
We use a small battery powered B&W TV. The advantages of this is:

1) Price (cost about $40)
2) Does NOT show the overscan - I know that what I am shooting will show correctly on the TV's of my customers!
3) Image is sharper than I've seen on LCD's.
Edward Troxel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2002, 11:36 AM   #15
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 53
<<<-- Originally posted by EdwardTr : We use a small battery powered B&W TV. The advantages of this is:

1) Price (cost about $40)
2) Does NOT show the overscan - I know that what I am shooting will show correctly on the TV's of my customers!
3) Image is sharper than I've seen on LCD's. -->>>

#3 was what I was looking for lately. Thanks. If I can get as clearer a picture from a $50 tv than a $300 monitor, then I an happy...but carrying it around is a definite disadvantage.

What is your setup?
Chris Simmons is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon XL1S / XL1 Watchdog

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:37 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network