Where/how can I get a rugged AC/DC supply for the XL-1 at DVinfo.net

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Old January 21st, 2002, 07:31 PM   #1
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Where/how can I get a rugged AC/DC supply for the XL-1

Okay, one more time. I think I've asked this before but maybe I haven't stated my problem clearly enough.

I'm using two XL-1 (the old one and the new "s") primarily in a number of indoor locations. There will be people, cables and gear all over the place. Each camera will be feeding a hires monitor for everyone to pass judgement on every take. If you've been in a busy, crammed interior shoot then you know one of the weakest links of the XL-1 is the AC/DC adaptor that comes with it. Anyone can breathe on the connections and we're "off the air."

Yes, I will have plenty of fully charged batteries, but in a string of 12 hour shooting days, it'll take too many batteries to keep two cameras powered up. Besides, we would have the extra added chore of charging and changing batteries every few hours. The Canon charger is not know for speed. So batteries will be used for exteriors and as a backup. DC needs to be the primary power source.

There must be a better way to power up the XL-1 without having to use the Canon AC/DC convertor and battery charger. Mustn't there? Anyone with any information, tips, whatever, that can prevent the lowly charger from being the weakest link please clue me in.

Thank you.
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Old January 22nd, 2002, 08:13 AM   #2
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Certainly you could adapt the charger.

All you need is a really, really good ac power supply and the Canon battery adapter that comes with the cam. I would make certain that the power supply has some form of overvoltage protection that prevents the power supply from frying the camera.

The other option is to goto a battery supply store and get custom pack built. The Battery Depot in Hammond, La builds custom packs all the time so I am sure there are people in your area doing the same. They could build you a pack that could last all day, though it might be a little large.

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Old January 22nd, 2002, 09:13 AM   #3
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Ozzie, I am not aware of a heavy duty AC/DC (7.2) power supplies made specifically for the Canon cameras. But we make a high quality 7.2V adapter, with overcurrent/overvoltage protection built in, voltage level LEDs and an XLR input. You can get a big lead acid 12v battery from Bescor, and hook up your Canons via the adapters. The camera uses about 10W, so the BES-015 pack will power it for 18 hours.
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Old January 24th, 2002, 04:10 AM   #4
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Even better, just use 6V Lead acids.... no conversion necessary, should work dandy for ages.

It's a handy trick to cut the plug that goes into the camera off the lead, and put a male/female plug arrangement on the two cut ends, that way you can switch between using the mains adaptor that comes with the camera and the lead acids.
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Old January 24th, 2002, 04:35 AM   #5
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Although it sounds like you've completely given up on the battery route, I've heard nothing but good things about these batteries made by Lenmar (Lenmar LIC941) that are supposed to last 6 hours. Think about it, you would only need 2 to get you through the day.
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Old January 24th, 2002, 07:48 AM   #6
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<<<-- Originally posted by Paul Robinson : Even better, just use 6V Lead acids.... no conversion necessary, should work dandy for ages.

It's a handy trick to cut the plug that goes into the camera off the lead, and put a male/female plug arrangement on the two cut ends, that way you can switch between using the mains adaptor that comes with the camera and the lead acids. -->>>

Paul, 6V is not enough, it needs 7.2V. One consideration working against 7V batteries is the camera does not show the battery status when the DC-900 dummy battery adapter is used. So you really do not know if you have several hours or several minutes left before cutting off. There is a little notch on the Li-Ion battery, which is different in shape from the dummy battery. When the dummy adapter is used, the battery icon goes away.
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Old January 24th, 2002, 03:42 PM   #7
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<<<-- Originally posted by dr_pepper_78 : Although it sounds like you've completely given up on the battery route, I've heard nothing but good things about these batteries made by Lenmar (Lenmar LIC941) that are supposed to last 6 hours. Think about it, you would only need 2 to get you through the day. -->>>

Dr. Pepper,

On the contrary, I haven't given up on batteries at all. I plan to use them as much as possible for exteriors. But most of our locations are interiors, with two XL-1 going almost constantly for 10 hours and for 5 to 6 consecutive days. To recharge all the batteries overnight we'll be needing more than two AC adapter/rechargers and assign an assistant just to make sure they're all fully charged for the next day's shoot. I wish Canon made the kind of charger Sony makes - it's faster and tells you exactly (I guess) how many hours' charge you have. The blinking red light system is adequate but that's as far as it goes.

The problem here is the type of productionn these cameras and batteries are being used for. I'm expecting to run down 8 batteries per day. To recharge them overnight is a bit of a feat. Hence my inquiries about good, reliable, and fool proof AC supplies.
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Old January 24th, 2002, 05:39 PM   #8
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Alex, you'll find 6V does work fine - Standard batteries drop below this before the cam gives up the ghost, I've been using them succesfully on my Panasonic for quite a while.

Because of the large capacity of Sealed lead acids, the terminal voltage will stay steady for ages.
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Old January 24th, 2002, 07:05 PM   #9
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Panasonic and Canon are not the same Paul. Canon uses Li Ion cells, nominally 3.6V. There are two of them in the pack. That is where 7.2V is coming from. Fully charged the pack can be almost 8V. The camera cuts out at about 6.6V by design.
If your camera uses NiCad cells, than a 4 cell pack at 1.5V ea would indeed be 6V nominal.
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