Why HD over SD? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Cross-Platform Post Production Solutions > CineForm Software Showcase

CineForm Software Showcase
Cross platform digital intermediates for independent filmmakers.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 30th, 2007, 06:15 PM   #16
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty Baggen View Post
In my opinion, when equipment purchase is not a factor, an HDV workflow offers a significant value to the client...whether they are standard def or not.
A-ha!

A key point not already mentioned - workflow, as opposed to the format delivered to the client.

If you have the equipment already, an HDV workflow makes perfect sense even if the client expressly requests SD. After all, the output from the HDV editing can just be converted to SD.

BTW - should the final product for the client be in mono, stereo or 5.1 surround? (Just a lighthearted question....)
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2007, 10:01 PM   #17
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: monroe, or
Posts: 572
Quote:
Originally Posted by John F Miller View Post
A-ha!

A key point not already mentioned - workflow, as opposed to the format delivered to the client.

If you have the equipment already, an HDV workflow makes perfect sense even if the client expressly requests SD. After all, the output from the HDV editing can just be converted to SD.

BTW - should the final product for the client be in mono, stereo or 5.1 surround? (Just a lighthearted question....)
Workflow may have been a bad choice of terms on my part.... after all, workflow means nothing to the client. They deal with the delivered product.

If the client specifically requests SD, and your workflow is HDV....that remains transparent to the client. The only difference is that they will (in most opinions) own a higher quality product.

I guess a good question is... do you consider a Flash (or other type of movie) for online or computer playback HD if it exceeds 720 x 480? In my mind, it is HD. Therefore, if your client would benefit from a framesize that exceeds 720 x 480... then by definition, they "need" HD. Given that garden variety screens and laptops are typically in the 1280 pixel dimension or more, this is a powerful argument in favor of an HD source. Try a fullscreen playback of a standard clip as opposed to an HD clip.... no comparison.

In terms of audio delivery, that depends on content and distribution/playback. For training stuff, where it is primarily talking heads or VO, mono is the obvious choice. Technically, if you encode for DVD, it is output as a stereo soundtrack (part of the DVD protocol), but if it is encoded from a mono source, so far as I know there is no risk of phase problems. If you have a music bed, it's nice to have that in stereo... but if the playback environment is mono, you're better off providing a mono master.
Marty Baggen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2007, 07:36 AM   #18
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty Baggen View Post
I guess a good question is... do you consider a Flash (or other type of movie) for online or computer playback HD if it exceeds 720 x 480? In my mind, it is HD. Therefore, if your client would benefit from a framesize that exceeds 720 x 480... then by definition, they "need" HD. Given that garden variety screens and laptops are typically in the 1280 pixel dimension or more, this is a powerful argument in favor of an HD source. Try a fullscreen playback of a standard clip as opposed to an HD clip.... no comparison.
Personally, I don't. I see computer generation graphics/animations etc as distinctly different from video. Actually, I have to give a Powerpoint presentation this morning and no doubt it will be projected and remotely shared at 1024 x 768. No one will think "ooooh, that's great definition" because that's what is expected from a computer-based presentation. If it were presented at 640 x 480 there would definitely be comments! Unfortunately, I don't have any HD video to put in it to get an "ooooh". Even if I did, the audience have much more important stuff on their minds (i.e., a crisis).

Best leave to give it....
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2007, 08:36 AM   #19
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: monroe, or
Posts: 572
Sounds like SD meets your needs.
Marty Baggen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 12:15 PM   #20
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Wyomissing, PA
Posts: 1,141
Images: 57
Some missed the basic point. If your updating your equipment, and still want to stick with SD, then get an HD camera anyway. You can shoot HD, have the benefit of an HD archive, and you can still convert the media to SD. If you're not happy with a few added hours of conversion, then switch the camera to SD and be happy that your only a setting away from HD should the need present itself.

Otherwise, wait a while longer and the world will make the choice for you.
__________________
Pete Ferling http://ferling.net It's never a mistake if you learn something new from it.
-------------------------------------------
Peter Ferling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 01:28 PM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: monroe, or
Posts: 572
That is a good approach Peter.

The essential premise that I tried to raise in this thread was not so much making a decision as to purchase HD equipment.

It is more than the ability to flip a switch and produce HD or SD.... It is the fact that SD from HDV origins is superior, not just for archiving and the ability to output HD in the future.... It is superior because it looks better in any framesize even if it remains in SD forever.

Secondary point that got muddled here is that HD is not only what we watch on large LCDs and Plasmas.... it is also comprised of clips that are integrated into Powerpoint presentations, CD ROM, and even online.
Marty Baggen is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Cross-Platform Post Production Solutions > CineForm Software Showcase

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:55 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network