New Affordable HD DVD format poised for release - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The DV Info Network > Digital Video Industry News

Digital Video Industry News
Events, press releases, bulletins and dispatches from the DV world at large.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 7th, 2007, 04:42 PM   #16
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Boda View Post
Looks like they are about to make a push to sign on the major studios:
I can't imagine any major studio backing this format now that consumers are buying the other two types of players - who wants to be involved in making it a three-way race? A more plausible application would be for independent distribution to corporate clients who buy the player as part of the project, but even there I don't see it. Why mess with multiple layer breaks when Blu-ray holds 25 GB on a single layer, or just play HD files from a computer and skip all these disc-based format entirely?
Kevin Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2007, 05:26 PM   #17
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: switzerland
Posts: 2,131
quote: "Why mess with multiple layer ..."
money, man, money...
why mess anyway with any of the new format to see what you already got on cheap DVD with a nice quality.
the difference will be made today by writing on the media, not reading it.
today people want to record more than 30 years ago.
even 30 years ago with VHS, the success was based on the fact that you can record TV on a 180min VHS cheap VHS tape, not by the fact you can see a movie.
all read only media were a failure at early stage (except CD , because it started a really new era in audio). and as soon the mp3 started, the CD was dying (people do care for size before quality).

look at the success of Divx, how many people are just happy to look at movies that can fit a 700mb CD-R. and look at DVD, how many commercial DVD are really using the full capacity of DVD. most of them are encoded a 5Mb/s sec to fit a single layer, or a dual layer at best when many features are present.
Giroud Francois is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2007, 05:33 PM   #18
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giroud Francois View Post
money, man, money...
why mess anyway with any of the new format to see what you already got on cheap DVD with a nice quality.
Right, for any application where money is the primary concern you can just make a standard DVD for a few cents, or encode to one of the compressed HD formats on the same cheap disc and play that on a computer. There simply isn't a need for this new format and it has a type of complexity which is inherently problematic. Good luck to them recruiting "major studios."
Kevin Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2007, 10:15 PM   #19
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 1,719
Yeah and we all know how picky dual layer DVD discs are. Can you imagine what would happen to a multi layer disc with even the smallest scratch? How well is this format going to hold up over time?

What is up with the name too? NME = Enemy

This format would have had a chance a year or two ago but not now. If consumers walked into a Store they are going to look at Toshiba or SONY as brandnames and not NME which nobody has ever heard of before. The same arguments that go against HD-DVD for not having more studio or hardware company support will really go against this format. The format really isn't all that much cheaper then HD-DVD anymore and a lot of people have already bought into HD-DVD and Blu-Ray. None of those people are going to jump on some wannabe format.
Thomas Smet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2007, 09:55 AM   #20
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Olney, Maryland
Posts: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Smet View Post
Yeah and we all know how picky dual layer DVD discs are. Can you imagine what would happen to a multi layer disc with even the smallest scratch? How well is this format going to hold up over time?...
Obviously, they are using different technology for multilayer ability that will also translate to BlueRay in the future. It's forseeable that BlueRay will need multilayers for 1080p source material.

The VMD bit rate blows away the standard DVD --- DVD is 9.8 Mbs as compared to VMD's 45Mbs.

Quote:
This format would have had a chance a year or two ago but not now. If consumers walked into a Store they are going to look at Toshiba or SONY as brandnames and not NME which nobody has ever heard of before. The same arguments that go against HD-DVD for not having more studio or hardware company support will really go against this format. The format really isn't all that much cheaper then HD-DVD anymore and a lot of people have already bought into HD-DVD and Blu-Ray. None of those people are going to jump on some wannabe format.
Like the article says, 66% of people surveyed are still waiting to make a purchase decision. When consumers walk into a store they will look at the price...and most will scratch their head and walk out empty handed.

Actually, the overall costs between Red Laser technology and BlueRay are dramatic. What does it cost to Author a BlueRay title...50 grand? The smaller independents films will naturally gravitate towards a more affordable format.

How was NME able to beat the other two formats in releasing Peter Jackson's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy? Affordability and a streamlined process built on existing technology.

The Nintendo vs Playstation & Xbox is an interesting analogy.
Jim Boda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2007, 10:30 AM   #21
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Boda View Post
Obviously, they are using different technology for multilayer ability that will also translate to BlueRay in the future.
Multi-layer discs are inherently problematic and take more work to set up, which is one of the biggest problems with this format. Blu-ray won't need this many layers for normal purposes.

Quote:
It's forseeable that BlueRay will need multilayers for 1080p source material.
Blu-ray already has dual-layer discs available with 50 GB capacity, and even the single-layer discs can hold several hours of HD content in VC1 format.

Quote:
When consumers walk into a store they will look at the price...and most will scratch their head and walk out empty handed.
Sales figures indicate that roughly 2 million people in the US bought either Blu-ray or HD-DVD capable devices in the past year, with ~100,000 HD-DVD players sold last Friday alone. It's too late for a third format with this level of sales for the other too.

Quote:
What does it cost to Author a BlueRay title...50 grand?
Unless you need some of the fancier menu features it's about $500 for a burner and another $500 or so for software, plus $50 for a few blank discs.

Quote:
How was NME able to beat the other two formats in releasing Peter Jackson's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy?
Interesting, but how many people actually bought the trilogy in this format?
Kevin Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2007, 01:25 PM   #22
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
> "Unless you need some of the fancier menu features it's about $500 for a burner and another $500 or so for software, plus $50 for a few blank discs."

Don't forget AACS licensing for copy protection. http://www.aacsla.com/support/
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2007, 06:12 PM   #23
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: switzerland
Posts: 2,131
hehe, an interesting result from a study shows that only 40% of PS3 owner are aware that their gamebox include a Blu-ray reader.

http://www.youtube.com/v/MFoyp71xw3w
Giroud Francois is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2007, 03:50 PM   #24
MPS Digital Studios
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
Posts: 8,531
I was hoping to say "Blu-Ray Strikes Back," but probably not. From IMDb (and yes, the money HD DVD gave to Paramount/DreamWorks helped):

'Is Sony Signaling End of War Over HD Video?
In the first hint that he may be reconsidering whether to continue the battle with Toshiba over high-definition video, Sony chief Howard Stringer said Wednesday that the format battle between the two companies has become "mostly a matter of prestige." In a speech in New York Thursday night, Stringer also suggested that the battle over Sony's Blu-ray system and Toshiba's HD DVD "doesn't mean as much as all that." At one time, he suggested, it might have been possible to unify the two formats, and if time travel were possible he would try to do that now. He decried the decision of Paramount/DreamWorks to sign an exclusive deal (worth a reported $150 million) to release films exclusively in the HD DVD format. "We were trying to win on the merits, which we were doing for a while, until Paramount changed sides," Stringer said.'

heath
__________________
My Final Cut Pro X blog
Heath McKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2007, 04:22 PM   #25
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Port St. Lucie, Florida
Posts: 2,614
Maybe we WILL see a compromise. I do think in the long run that would be best.

Mike
__________________
Chapter one, line one. The BH.
Mike Teutsch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2007, 02:58 AM   #26
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East London, South Africa
Posts: 31
Quote:
Beyond cost and infrastructure advantages, red-laser discs have a maximum data transfer rate of 40Mbps versus 36 Mbps for HD DVD and Blu-ray, which gives it the potential of sharper, more detailed pictures over the competing Blu-ray and HD DVD formats, the company said.
LOL - Like anybody can actually see that difference.
Louis Mostert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2007, 09:19 AM   #27
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 86
They don't even know what the data transfer rate for Blu-ray is.


40Mbps for movies
48Mbps for movie + audio
Higher yet for data

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-ray_Disc
David Moody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 13th, 2007, 01:27 PM   #28
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Olney, Maryland
Posts: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Shaw View Post
...Unless you need some of the fancier menu features it's about $500 for a burner and another $500 or so for software, plus $50 for a few blank discs...
Obviously, I was referring to the cost to a major movie production studio to author a feature film...not some home or garage operation. It's my understanding that some of the Blue ray authoring software excedes the $200,000. price tag.

Quote:
While a blue laser solves the capacity problem, it comes with its own (train load) of baggage, including a confusing and costly format war between technology titans Sony and Toshiba and their respective allies. Blue laser has also been fraught with manufacturing delays (primarily blue-laser diode production), multiple cracks in its repressive AACS encryption scheme and cost issues driven by expensive authoring tools that reach up to $50K per film, ballooning the final disc cost to consumers.
http://displaydaily.com/2007/09/17/r...-life-to-dvds/
Jim Boda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 13th, 2007, 01:54 PM   #29
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Boda View Post
Obviously, I was referring to the cost to a major movie production studio to author a feature film...not some home or garage operation. It's my understanding that some of the Blue ray authoring software excedes the $200,000. price tag.
Perhaps, but that's not particularly relevant to most of us. What is relevant is that anyone can make a Blu-ray disc today with a modest initial investment and market that to millions of people buying Blu-ray capable devices. Or you can pay a few hundred dollars to have an HD-DVD title authored and distributed by the company Microsoft is backing to help get that format off the ground. The odds of a third format catching on with consumers and being supported by standard disc authoring programs is slim at best.
Kevin Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2007, 10:50 AM   #30
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Olney, Maryland
Posts: 197
HD VMD update

Well, to update the release of the product...

HD VMD players finally began to ship after 3 years of development. I believe they became available to the US market just after Christmas (Dec 27) through the PCrush distributor.

10,000 units ordered by the US distributor and 10,000 units ordered by the central Europe distributor.

http://www.nmeinc.com/production.aspx

Now, I'm waiting to read an actual review of the player.

_______________________________________
Notes from the interview w/ the CEO: http://www.wallst.net/superstocks/su...=4216&play=yes

Initial version of HD VMD will be at the 25 gig range.

6 Month target:

1) Mass adoption of the HD VMD format
2) PC Market / release a software & VMD Drive (player) for PC's

9 Month target:

1) Release Recordable VMD & authoring software / target industrial archiving

12 month target:

1) VMD Blue ray (100 gigs)
2) VMD used in GAME machine industry
Jim Boda is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The DV Info Network > Digital Video Industry News

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:06 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network