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Old November 3rd, 2008, 01:25 PM   #1
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Energy Star TVs to reduce carbon emissions

CEA PRAISES NEW ENERGY STAR TELEVISION SPECIFICATION
Energy Efficient TVs Could Decrease Carbon Emissions Equal to One Million Cars

CEA: Press Release Detail - Press Release Detail

Not mentioned in the article is that the new Energy Star spec relies on IEC 62087, of which I was the project leader.

Because LCD and plasma TVs consume power differently based on source video levels, we developed the TV power measurement standard around a ten minute video that is modeled on more than 200 hours of video analyzed from primetime broadcasts in five countries. The source content was licensed from BBC, CEA, Milwaukee Public TV and Sharp Labs of America.

The IEC standard ships with four discs: the CD of text, 50 Hz and 60 Hz DVDs and a Blu-ray Disc. I performed the editing and encoding, and authored the DVDs. Sony Creative volunteered to author the BD. Volumes are low, so the discs are duplicated (burned and engraved), rather than replicated (pressed.)

I used After Effects for rate conversion, Vegas Pro 8 for editing and DVD Architect for authoring. Content came from many sources: MPEG files, HDCAM tapes, DVC Pro. Some was SD, some 720p24, and most was 1080i. I uncompressed all of the critical video and worked from a RAID. (HDCAM tapes were captured at a local post house to portable hard drives.)

The goal wasn't drama or a great "look", but accurate matching to a target histogram. I got to know all the details about 601 vs. 709 color space, full range vs 16-235 video levels and such. It was more of a scientific project than an artistic one.

The IEC standard was just released last month here:
IEC Web Store | Publication Detail > IEC 62087-BD Ed. 2.0 English
(I'm not selling and I don't get a cut. Unless you plan to measure TV power consumption, you shouldn't buy it.)

In any case, if you plan to purchase a TV, definitely get one with Energy Star certification. Previous Energy Star TV programs measured only standby power. The new spec, effective Nov 1st, 2008, measures active power as well.

http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partner...inalCharts.pdf
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Old November 3rd, 2008, 03:36 PM   #2
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I should mention that CEE (Consortium for Energy Efficiency) takes Energy Star one step further: To qualify for CEE Tier 2, TVs must be at least 15% more efficient than required by Energy Star.

Here's the current CEE product list:
http://www.cee1.org/files/TVQualifyingProductList.pdf

The big utilities in California (PG&E, SCE, SDG&E, SMUD) offer a $20 rebate to qualified retailers when they sell a CEE Tier 2 TV within the service area. Sorry, the rebate doesn't necessarily pass through to the consumer. The idea is to help motivate retailers to sell the most efficient TVs available.

BTW, the qualifying TVs that I've seen from major manufacturers don't compromise picture quality whatsoever. TVs still have to compete on their merits when shown side by side on the showroom floor. Lower power simply means lower power bills, less heat generated (less air conditioning needed), and possibly longer component life, due to lower temperatures. In other words, it's all good.
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Old November 5th, 2008, 03:11 PM   #3
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Old November 5th, 2008, 04:46 PM   #4
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Hi Kenn,

The global warming debate is moot.

Buying an energy efficient TV makes sense because:
* It saves you money on your power bill
* It reduces your air conditioning load
* In aggregate, it lessens the need for building more power plants
* It cuts consumption of non-renewable resources
* It reduces emissions that lead to acid rain (in some parts of the world)
* Lower component temperatures might increase product life

There are no real advantages to buying an inefficient TV, all else being equal.

The bottom line: choosing an energy efficient TV makes a ton of sense, regardless of one's political stance or belief in man-made global warming.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 06:38 PM   #5
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Here's the IEC press release:
IEC - News releases > nr3608 - IEC International Standard brings energy efficiency to LCD and plasma TVs

I get credit for creating the World's most boring DVD and Blu-ray™. Beat that! ;)
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