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PC or Mac, how to take your video to DVD or the Internet.


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Old April 7th, 2002, 07:31 PM   #1
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Transferring video over the internet

Lets say I want to send my video over the internet but want the recipient to be able to pull it off the net just as if I had driven to them and handed them the tape, start out digital end up digital, I know I have a program to make video for the internet, but thats not what I want, I don't want to have the video viewed on the internet, I just want to save myself some driving time and want it to be clean and usable when it gets to the TV station. The big question is how would they pull it off the internet and turn it back to a usable format ? I don't know what format they use but it is a large cassette tape on commercial dubbing gear, they have 10 or so work stations set up to edit each story but only one station has a machine that accepts mini DV, at some studios I have to use my camera to transfer the data and I am trying to save myself some driving time. Also would be useful if I need video from another person across the country.
Thanks for any help
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Old April 8th, 2002, 12:53 AM   #2
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The best way to do this is to find some(actually a lot) of space on an FTP server. Then all you do is upload the files to your folder and your client downloads it from there. It's going to be expensive and also hard to find.

You're going to need a very fast connection as you are talking about transfering files the are GB's in size. Even Joe and his 3000k/s FTTC line would be waiting a while.
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Old April 8th, 2002, 05:54 AM   #3
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You Need to Know What Format You Will Use.

You will need to know the client's format to make that determination. I do not think it is practical, at least not yet.

Regular DV need 1 GB for every 4.5 minutes of video. That's one heck of a lot of bandwidth. If you were planning to DVD the typical disks stores 4.7 GB, that's still a lot.

Before you are done, a courier service may look as the fast alternative.

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Old April 8th, 2002, 08:44 AM   #4
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I will have to find out the format they use. I have cable modem service that is available to me as of this week, uploads according to tech friends are about 115 kbps, downloads a little higher. Driving time to studio is 1 hour. After posting this I realized that the program I use, Pinnacle Studio DV 7, works bi-directional, I can take video into the program on mini dv by firewire, edit the shoot, and then return it to the camera onto DV back through the same firewire card that it downloaded from. That means that my firewire card transfers in both directions. The big question is, is there a program that interfaces a firewire card with email service or that type of file, also, what type of file could you send it as ??? Does that make sense
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Old April 8th, 2002, 10:29 AM   #5
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Even if there was something that interfaces with your firewire card, bandwidth is still going to be a problem. As Nathan said your looking at 1GB/4.5 minutes, that's 1024MB or 1 024 000kB or 1 024 000 000Bytes or 1 024 000 000 000kb so at 115kbps the 1 hour drive is a good break from the office.

Now I know why they use MB, GB etc. Numbers that big fry my brain, I need a beer to stop this smoking. I hope I got it right, if I didn't I hope you still get my point.
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Old April 8th, 2002, 10:51 AM   #6
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You can transfer data onto a 10 Gb or larger storage drive, then send it by courier. Just make sure your drive is compatible with their system. When you consider gas cost AND your time...it's really not that expensive to pay for someone else to deliver it.

Don't forget that taxis will deliver packages.
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Old April 8th, 2002, 10:53 AM   #7
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They'll even bring you beer and pizza for those dusk till dawn editing sessions!!!!
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Old August 24th, 2003, 08:45 PM   #8
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We have a similar issue where we need to find a way to transfer hours of video over the internet so that it can be edited from another location.

Is there any kind of compression format for video that would retain high enough quality on the video that it could be edited for production on DVD after it has been compressed? Such as DivX or MPEG? If so, at what bit rate using what software?
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Old August 24th, 2003, 11:22 PM   #9
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Did someone mention Pizza? As long as it isn't covered in mayonaise and octopus then it's good, I hate it when my friends order those weird pizzas.

I like John's hard drive suggestions, it will save them time as well since the data is already digital and no need to batch capture in real time. If you are doing a lot of work with them, then a couple of external drives that you can send them the data on is a good idea, they just mail the drive back to you. Hard drives are pretty cheap now, that two hour drive you would have to make adds up to a lot of wasted time just driving.

But if the courier service fee eats up most of the money that you make off of the video, then maybe a nice two hour is the cheapest route. There's a new book you have been meaning to read, just buy the audio tape version and listen to it as you drive. Or have a friend earn some beer money, they drive your car and they get $20. How much beer can $20 buy, I haven't bought beer in the States in a long time.
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Old August 25th, 2003, 06:30 AM   #10
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Whow! That question was posed April 2002, that was a new P4 2.4gig computer ago, Vegas Video 3 replaced the crash riddled Pinnacle Studio DV 7, and I learned of a new service provided by my cable service, the suppossedly x 10 speeds are called comcast pro and come with a price tag of 100 bucks a month. Not many people know about it. Of the hard drive solution, I shoot evening news and if it is more than 6 hours old, it's old. The problem is getting the studios to cooperate and dedicate someone with the knowledge to download the footage.
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