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Documentary Techniques
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Old October 18th, 2006, 07:39 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Scattergood

Is there any advice for filming photographs? I would much prefer to do it this way rather than inserting image files, which can look a little lifeless. However I'd like to have the effect where the camera appears to move around the photo's (a la 'Cheers' and 'Roseanne'!!) - use Macro and move the camera (tricky) or carry this out in FCP perhaps?
David
Filming photos can be difficult as the ambient lighting can affect the colour of the photos.

The simplest way is to add the photos in FCP (or Motion) and simply move them around to give you the 'cheers' effect. A slow pan across the photos either vertically or horizontally (or any direction) can be very effective. In FCP use the motion window to set keyframes for start and end positions. FCP will do the rest.

You could mix this with footage of the photos in a gallery situation for example, cutting back and forth to the filmed photos and the FCP imported photos.

Regards


Andrew

edit: check out the Ken Burns effect in iMovie.
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Old October 18th, 2006, 07:53 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Scattergood
Only trouble is I'm having to 'paint' the scenes using the LDC monitor...I guess I could used my TV but I won't have this on the shoot. It's a shame the iMac 24" doesn't have composite inputs.
I was thinking of using Paulo's trucolour settings, then as you say coo them down a little, unless you could advise me of a more relevant scene file?

So when white balancing I'll only lose the Whitepaint R and not B setting? From what I've read, there's seems to be those who swear by White balancing and those who don't (losing natural white reflections etc). Should I really vear towards white balancing as standard?
Thanks Stephen I'll try that on the menu.
You can use your LCD monitor with success, after you get familiar with how it skews color. This would be true for any monitor. The whitepaint R and B settings are in the camera for a good reason. Have you ever white balanced against a cool card or a warm card? You definately get a look that is unique. Essentially you are white balancing your camera or using a preset (5600 or 3200), whichever you choose and then apply the Whitepaint R or B (in your case B). Please don't look at it so disparagingly, give it a try for a unique look that might please you and meet your expectations.

good luck.
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Old October 18th, 2006, 09:27 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drew Curran
David
Filming photos can be difficult as the ambient lighting can affect the colour of the photos.

The simplest way is to add the photos in FCP (or Motion) and simply move them around to give you the 'cheers' effect. A slow pan across the photos either vertically or horizontally (or any direction) can be very effective. In FCP use the motion window to set keyframes for start and end positions. FCP will do the rest.

You could mix this with footage of the photos in a gallery situation for example, cutting back and forth to the filmed photos and the FCP imported photos.

Regards


Andrew

edit: check out the Ken Burns effect in iMovie.
Thanks Drew - I assumed it was standard practice to film the photo's rather than insert them as images, but I will indeed try this method - I can obtain high res images from the photographer himself.
'cheers' for that ;)


Quote:
You can use your LCD monitor with success, after you get familiar with how it skews color. This would be true for any monitor. The whitepaint R and B settings are in the camera for a good reason. Have you ever white balanced against a cool card or a warm card? You definately get a look that is unique. Essentially you are white balancing your camera or using a preset (5600 or 3200), whichever you choose and then apply the Whitepaint R or B (in your case B). Please don't look at it so disparagingly, give it a try for a unique look that might please you and meet your expectations.
To be honest I've been using the presets (mainly outdoors at the moment). But you're right. I should really try for myself - can I get hold of cool/warm cards or could I use my own white card (and please forgive my naiveity here).
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Old October 18th, 2006, 11:23 AM   #19
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Quote:
edit: check out the Ken Burns effect in iMovie.
Having just played around with this in iMovie, this is exactly what I was after - thanks. There is a lot of fine detail on his photographs which require close insepction. Just hope it's this easy in FCP!!

Is there a general rule for the size/format of images I would import for FCP?
These photographs are integral to the project and as such, they'll need to stand up when viewed large scale.
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