Glide Track...or what? - Page 4 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Dolly / Track / Cable


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 2nd, 2009, 04:53 AM   #46
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,212
Maybe I'm unlucky but we always seem to have a building edge or a flagpole or some other strong vertical which gives away the flexibility at once. We're using a heavy (and old) Manfrotto which is very stable.

The allen nuts on the carriage are slackened as far as they can be (the very helpful designer suggested that) but still there's a tendency to stick, especially if there's been a significant change of climate (temp-humidity) in the intervening period. It also takes practice - especially avoiding hitting the central mount.

Don't misunderstand me, for the money it's not bad and reasonable value but I've spent my entire career avoiding "nearly right" things and saving to buy the best I can afford for the job. This IMHO is "nearly right".

I'm hoping the braked pulley (and two tripods) modification will help but we can't expect to use it on weddings as I explained. I would have gladly paid for a unit with a larger carriage on proper bearings but they would have cost of course. I also wish we'd bought the heavier unit but the designer's opinion was that it wasn't necessary.
Philip Howells is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 4th, 2009, 07:33 PM   #47
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 446
I often read comments that there is additional equipment that is needed. For example a couple extra tripods...not always necessary. But it is a benefit to use the GC or Pegasus, etc, elevated. Depends on the shot you have in mind. Sometimes its going to take a little extra equipment to get the kind of shots you want. Whether that be a jib a steadicam, GC, track system. No doubt its extra work but the benefits of using the extra tools to make the kind of film you want is going to raise the production value. I only say this because I used to be concerned with the amount of equipment but soon realized that it is worth it. If it causes you to have to arrive a bit early stay a bit later, so what....your product and your brand will certainly reflect this. I'm not saying that you have to have this equipment but use the tools that you think will polish off the production. If its cost, thats one thing, but if its not cost and just an effort factor, we need to figure out a way to make it work.

I just think that we are too quick to write off a particular piece of equipment because of the additional effort it is going to require.
__________________
John J. Moon
www.northernlightfilmworks.com - Event DV Top 25 Recipient
John Moon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 4th, 2009, 11:09 PM   #48
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,212
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Moon View Post
(snipped)... use the tools that you think will polish off the production. If its cost, thats one thing, but if its not cost and just an effort factor, we need to figure out a way to make it work.

I just think that we are too quick to write off a particular piece of equipment because of the additional effort it is going to require.
I think John's point is well made. The problem is at weddings specifically the balance between investment/profitability and time/polish is often critical and the time you think you have to invest in getting say a GT shot done suddenly disappears because something unexpected has occurred - and unexpected occurrences are the very stuff of weddings.

Perhaps I didn't make it clear that I now concentrate specifically on weddings and it was in that context that I gave my opinion, in other circumstances I agree with John's point.
Philip Howells is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 5th, 2009, 02:11 AM   #49
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Bedfordshire, UK
Posts: 863
Here is our latest piece which features shots from the GT compact.

Elizabeth & Dave | Highlights at Notley Abbey Mintyslippers.com Wedding Blog
Danny O'Neill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 9th, 2009, 02:11 AM   #50
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Arta, Greece
Posts: 342
I have a glidetrack and it's good for its money, although repetition is the key to getting the right shot. But recently I discovered the ultimate gear for this job. It's the Miniskater and you can see it here

P+S TECHNIK | Professional Cine Equipment Manufacture | SKATER Camera Dolly Product Family

And here is a video demo

SKATER Mini - Trailer

Not only it can do the glidetrack moves but also circular moves and more! Strange thing is, there is no price anywhere, it says there are rental spots and for a buying price you must contact them via email! Bizarre, but this device is certainly outstanding!
Dimitris Mantalias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2009, 11:57 AM   #51
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Worldwide
Posts: 1,589
The problem with the skater is that it needs to work across a very smooth man-made surface to work correctly. This essentially rules it out for most outdoor work over normal ground, uneven roads or country terrains. It is also expensive, especially if you include all the extra pieces of kit.

The GlideTrack is a nice item and not only is it cheaper than anything else out there, it is simple, lightweight and not bulky or difficult to set-up.

However, if you look at some of the Glidetrack videos you'll see quite a lot of minor stutters and the odd mini-bump during the slides. I'm quite amazed that some of this is shown in promotion videos as it certainly would put some people off who search for the perfect smooth sliding pans.
But some videos are nice and smooth throughout, so I'm sure its mainly down to the cameraman and how steady his camera/tripod/track is when combined with his physical hand movements to push or pull the camera.

For outdoor work over varying terrain where you need to carry a lightweight outfit that doesn't break the bank, the Glidetrack seems perfect, and I'm certainly looking at getting one to try out on some future expeditions.

The big downside for me is how short the track is. I like to sometimes see long smooth slides and the very short distance between stops does limit you in a lot of work. Obviously extra-long rails would be more difficult to carry or transport, but if a folding rail could be made it would be perfect. The main problem would be that the grooves in any collapsible rails would transmit into tiny glitches during the slide; but I reckon if the joins fitted perfectly it might work smooth enough throughout a long slide.
__________________
www.WILDCARP.com
www.NIKON.me.uk
Tony Davies-Patrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 13th, 2009, 06:08 AM   #52
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Guernsey , Channel Islands
Posts: 242
re

Are most using the 1m glide or 1.5?


Im not sure which to order?

regards

luke
Luke Oliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 14th, 2009, 12:24 AM   #53
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,212
Luke, it depends on your camera and your personal criteria.

I have a 1m standard and, thanks to the generosity of the manufacturer, a 0.5m length also. The fact is that both flex, indeed, as the company agrees, any single piece extrusion, even their heavy duty version, will flex. The question is how much and whether that is acceptable. The lighter your camera the less the flex will bother you.

We use Z1 cameras and with one of those on a 1m length supported at both ends (the recommended support positions) the GT flexes in the middle about 4mm. That produces a skew to the images which for us (and I think for others) is unacceptable.

It's the same with the 0.5m length. I have sent the company pictures of the flex as shown by a spirit level but unfortunately they were dismissed as the cumulative effects of various factors inc tripod legs!

The basic idea of the Glidetrack is good, the execution is the problem. We're looking at solutions that should overcome most of the flex problem; making it pretty is another matter.

Despite these shortcomings we believe the GT is the best buy available at present. Its simplicity is commendable especially for a wedding videographer who needs to move fast.
Philip Howells is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Dolly / Track / Cable

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:57 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network