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Old August 3rd, 2006, 11:53 PM   #1
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Do you lock into your script or outline?

I'm curious. How much creativity do you all allow once filming begins. Do you stick to your script? Or is a case where your finished product is not exactly what you had planned for going into filiming?

Last edited by Scott Cozad; August 4th, 2006 at 12:49 AM.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 12:03 AM   #2
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With this amount of time, I will most likely write a detailed outline, with certain necessary lines. I won't have time for a script.

Do you already have an idea??
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Old August 4th, 2006, 01:08 AM   #3
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I've known for a while where I want to film. I've also had a vague idea what I want to film. Now it's just a matter of molding that idea around the theme. I think I've done that today. I'll work up a loose script over the weekend and probably film everything on Monday. My last entry was heavy on the post production side, but we had a full month. This time post will be short and sweet.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 03:23 AM   #4
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What's a script ? :P
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Old August 4th, 2006, 05:58 AM   #5
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I wrote a rough script, which I am using to give me some direction to follow. I rather like this theme because the idea popped right away. Doesn't always flow like that.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 10:27 AM   #6
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Here's a good example, when you have time, hit my web site and download the script for "Cat Fight at OK and Corral". Monday I will be posting it on Google and you can see some of the changes I incorporated when shooting the piece.

Sometimes a good actor will provide the correct motivation to take things a slightly different direction. Sometimes it's purely the weather, camera positions, lighting, and other physical and judgment calls.

Watching the behind the scenes footage from "Wolf Creek", the Director was talking about how they wanted these nice typically hot dusty exterior weather wide angle vista type shots you might expect from the Australian Outback but the day they went to shoot, it rained like crazy for the first time in something like 10 years.

Adapt and move on. It worked for their film.

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Old August 4th, 2006, 10:49 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Cozad
I'm curious. How much creativity do you all allow once filming begins. Do you stick to your script? Or is a case where your finished product is not exactly what you had planned for going into filiming?

A script is ball park plan, and more of a living document. A well written script will help determine appropriate actors, scene locations and supports that will also determine budgets, etc.

However, for simple stuff, such as this contest, a two-collumn word document will suffice. Collumn one describes scene and camera movements/action. Collumn two contains actors dialog/action.

Actors should be given some leeway and allowed to participate or suggest changes or improvements. It creates a more meaniful environment. You as the director make the final call, and make sure that's squared away up front. You have to be the kind of person whom is willing to listen, and recognize when a suggestion might actually be funnier or better than your original intent. Not to say a complete change in direction, as you own the story line, but little changes to an act, the wording, etc. should be given consideration.

The other factor that affects a script is sometimes the shoot or location doesn't work as intented on paper, and you'll have to improvise. Maybe you overlooked a piece of equipment, or the weather changed, or a permit is needed, etc.

The most important thing to remember about stuff like this is to have fun.
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Old August 4th, 2006, 11:06 AM   #8
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Last time I just started with a series of images in my head. I went out and shot them and then figured out what words might be needed after. It worked enough for that one, but I don't plan on repeating the process. this time I've recruited a writer - and I'm hoping she has ideas because so far I don't like any of mine. But the reality is I don't have actors. So the script will have to be a guide line or else the sentences will have to be very short with lots of cutting because no one is going to get more than 10 words out at a time.

One of my new favorite tv shows to rent (the BBC drama MI5) has in its extras copies of the scripts. It's really interesting to see how much and how little things change. It seems like when they actually reach the point of needing to speak the lines things get tweaked to flow better. But it never strays from the idea that needs to get across.
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Old August 6th, 2006, 04:27 PM   #9
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On the script and dialog, yes, things often sound good in my head and on paper but when you choose an actor with an accent or one that is supposed to portray a certain character type, saying something like "with whom should you like to speak" isn't right coming from that stereotypical biker gang member.

Write it like you are the character saying it. Even then, you're going to change some things. Just happens and, it makes it better.

Learn to be flexible for your sake and the actors. Actors arent puppets. Some directors try to make them so but they are supposed to apply their craft to your words. That won't happen if you don't let them out of the box once in a while to play.

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Old August 6th, 2006, 04:36 PM   #10
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I'm an outline guy...scripts change...often by large chunks. This happens more in big hollywood productions as they can afford rewrites...but it mostly happens duning preproduction/rehearsals so the time is not wasted with cameras rolling and huge crews...if you have actors who tend to improv alot...you can plan for scenes to have extra takes in your schedule...I would imagine they do that with any jim carrey, robin williams or will farrell films. Don't be rigid...be prepared...this job has to be fluid, stuff happens to prevent you from getting the shooting finished constantly.
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:02 PM   #11
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Look at the bonus features of The Pink Panther with Steve Martin. In the making of the movie, it clearly shows Steve suggesting changes with the director while on set.

Of course, even if you have a large budget and a lot of people on your team, it's still the same issue with limited time and resources, just on a much larger scale.

Even with all these people, or if it's just you, you'll still think up new ideas while "playing through". Likewise, you'll encounter problems that sometimes won't surface until you load up the clips into the edit suite.

Bottom line is that it's better your script be a sail, and not the anchore. Put it another way, how many rolaids are you willing to chew?
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