UWOL #12/DVC "Winter in Norway" by Trond Saetre at DVinfo.net

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Old January 7th, 2009, 10:54 AM   #1
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UWOL #12/DVC "Winter in Norway" by Trond Saetre

This video was shot in 2 days.
Location is the Hardanger plateu in Norway at about 800 and 1250 meters above sea level.
Wanted to show how the nature is up there during winter.
One thing I had a little trouble with, was to keep the tripod steady in the deep powder snow. But hopefully it isn't too noticeable.

Hope you enjoy, and I'm looking forward to any feedback.


Trond

Link:
http://www.uwolchallenge.com/UWOLDVC...erinnorway.mov

Lower quality (youtube)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqJnpQ3Iuq4
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Old January 7th, 2009, 11:39 AM   #2
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An eye for beauty.
The warmed colours of the last shot were an excellent ending.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 12:07 PM   #3
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I didn't notice any problems with camera steadiness; looked pretty solid to me, any tips to share for others setting tripods in that kind of snow?

Norway looks like my kind of place! I can't get enough cold weather and snow, and it looks like this season is a sight to behold in your area. Of all the shots I think I like the water rushing behind the ice at about 1:25 the most. That gentle blue/aquamarine tint the ice has, your choice of focus, it's a beautiful clip.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 12:15 PM   #4
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Robert,
Best tips would be "don't touch the camera at all while shooting". :)

Before I set up the tripod, I tried to compact the snow as much as possible jumping up and down, but that only partly helped as the tripod would dig itself down (usually only one or two of the legs) whenever I touched it or the camera.
So the challenge was to be able to touch the camera (during zooming or panning and focusing) without getting too much shaky movements. A remote would have helped a lot with the zoom/focus.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 12:55 PM   #5
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I can see it now, a tripod with tennis rackets strapped to each leg, sitting on top of the snow.

I'm impressed enough as it is, now you tell me you did this without a remote? Good hands, man.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 01:12 PM   #6
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Tronde,

Really nice clear beautiful images, so nice I did not really get the sense of cold. A very nice progression. the only thing I thought could be patched was the one long zoom on the creek and it vanished right when I wanted to see the close up. Boy you have lots of snow!! I like the snow covered building and the close ups the best.

Nice Job!!!
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Old January 7th, 2009, 01:17 PM   #7
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Now that is Cold !! Nice sampling of winter landscape in Norway- beautiful scenes. Time to get the long underwear out.

I'm jsut wondering, and I tend to do it to, if you need as much camera movement or zooming as you added.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 01:34 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Martens View Post
I can see it now, a tripod with tennis rackets strapped to each leg, sitting on top of the snow.
Hmm, I wonder if this is possible. Gotta try it sometime if I get a chance.

Dale,
Thanks for the feedback. I'll look into the shot you mentioned.

Chris,
Yep, it sure was cold. Especially the day I filmed the building. It was around -15C there.
You are probably right about the need (or not need) of movement/zooming. I'll check into that.
Thank you for the feedback!
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Old January 7th, 2009, 02:51 PM   #9
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So, you have been on top of mother Norway this Christmas! :-)
Second what have been said about zooming and pans. My tip will be not to overdue. Exposure to the white snow seem fine to me. Nice colors in the end shot.

Good work, Trond!
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Old January 7th, 2009, 03:10 PM   #10
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Thank you Per Johan.
I'll remember what has been said about the amount of zoom/panning.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 03:14 PM   #11
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Hi Trond,

What a peaceful film, despite the obvious cold. I suppose your choice of music contributed greatly to that.

Really pretty images. At :40 it looks like a painting. Also, I liked the rack focusing on the twigs. The only shot that brought me out of my trance was the speed on the zoom out at 1:46.

What is showcased there at the end? A significant figure or simply art?
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Old January 7th, 2009, 03:22 PM   #12
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What is showcased there at the end? A significant figure or simply art?
The figure is supposed to be a Norwegian "troll".

From Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll
A troll is a fearsome member of a race of creatures from Norse mythology. Originally more or less the Nordic equivalents of giants, although often smaller in size, the different depictions have come to range from the fiendish giants – similar to the ogres of England (also called Trolls at times, see Troller's Gill) – to a devious, more human-like folk of the wilderness, living underground in hills, caves or mounds. In the Faroe islands, Orkney and Shetland tales, trolls are called trows, adopted from the Norse language when these islands were settled by Vikings.

Nordic literature, art and music from the romantic era and onwards has adapted trolls in various manners – often in the form of an aboriginal race, endowed with oversized ears and noses. From here, as well as from Scandinavian fairy tales such as Three Billy Goats Gruff, trolls have achieved international recognition, and in modern fantasy literature and role-playing games, trolls are featured to the extent of being stock characters.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 03:33 PM   #13
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Ah! As soon as I read that I thought, "I should have known it was a troll!" :)

Thanks, Trond, for the explanation and for braving the COLD to bring us such pretty images.

Speaking of images, Robert, now I've got one of tennis rackets tied to tripod legs stuck in my head...
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Old January 7th, 2009, 04:22 PM   #14
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Hi Trond,

I really liked the troll at the end. Interesting definition because I couldn't tell if your troll was a giant or a small figure.

My favorite shot was about mid way through of the forest. The leave-less trees weighted down with layers of snow, camera pulling back. Very cool.

I was thinking that I too didn't get a sense of cold. So I watched a couple more times and realized that you showed us extreme harsh cold with the building then progressed through the beautiful, comfortable side of the cold and the snow (at least thats the ride I was on). That neat looking building looked like it new all too well about 'cold'. I've lived in cold areas but I don't recall snow sticking to the sides of buildings like that unless it was super cold.

For steadier shots in powder, what about using a piece of plywood to plop down over the snow and placing the tripod on that? Just a thought.

Very tranquil and pleasant. Thanks
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Old January 7th, 2009, 04:50 PM   #15
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What A Tourism Movie!

Your tranquil movie, with it's beautiful images and relaxing music, had a profound and halcyon effect on my mind and body. It's meditative qualities make it perfect for regular viewing after stressful days. How many DV Infoers can boast of creating medicinal motion pictures? Wonderful job! Camera work, subject choice, use of light, texture, architecture, nature and varietal depth of field made this movie a pleasure to watch. I will be a regular fan of the UWOL crowd now.
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