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Old April 1st, 2005, 04:57 AM   #1
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DVD 24p-roblems

I know similar questions have been asked, but i would really appreciate an answer to my specif problem. (in lamens terms)

We shot some 24p footage on a Canon XL2, edited it on Adobe Premiere Pro 1.5, and then used Premiere to author the dvd. (which might have been our mistake.. we also have Adobe Encore)

The thing is when all was said and done, and we played it on our television some clips seemed 'rough' and 'jumpy.' Especially a scene shot from indside a car. (the motion outside the window was not smooth.) Our theory is that we're not doing something right while making the dvd concerning the whole 24p aspect, but what do I know?

Is anyone familiar with our situation and/or can offer some helpful advice to make our video look smoother?

Thanks.

Lon
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Old April 1st, 2005, 11:51 AM   #2
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This is the nature of 24p video and 24fps film. You can appreciate that the motion will be relatively more jumpy than in 60 field per second NTSC video, because of the limited samples.

Now, this usually does not stand out in films because there of the written and unwritten rules of cinematography. They have rules of thumb for how fast pans and other camera movement should be (I heard 7 seconds for a full screens width pan somewhere). When shooting in a car, they usually shoot front to back, not side to side, so motion judder is minimized.

Also, since video has deeper depth of field, generally speaking, your in-motion backgrounds will be more in focus than they would be in 35mm film photography, aggravating the judder effect.

Work-arounds that you can implement: Lock the camera down, as much as possible, or use well-planned and very slow camera movements. Just plain remember the nature of what you are working with, and plan all motion of the camera and characters accordingly.
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Old April 2nd, 2005, 03:40 AM   #3
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So what your saying is that it wasn't really a problem with our dvd authoring program?

That gives me a small sense of relief, however there is this shot that i really want to get.

To let you know, when we filmed it (a close profile shot of the driver's face against the outside and moving background) the camera was still.

Do you think it would help if we drove slower?

Thanks.

Lon
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